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11 - 20 of 38 results for: EARTHSYS ; Currently searching autumn courses. You can expand your search to include all quarters

EARTHSYS 122: Evolution of Marine Ecosystems (BIO 119, GS 123, GS 223B)

Life originally evolved in the ocean. When, why, and how did the major transitions occur in the history of marine life? What triggered the rapid evolution and diversification of animals in the Cambrian, after more than 3.5 billion years of Earth's history? What caused Earth's major mass extinction events? How do ancient extinction events compare to current threats to marine ecosystems? How has the evolution of primary producers impacted animals, and how has animal evolution impacted primary producers? In this course, we will review the latest evidence regarding these major questions in the history of marine ecosystems. We will develop familiarity with the most common groups of marine animal fossils. We will also conduct original analyses of paleontological data, developing skills both in the framing and testing of scientific hypotheses and in data analysis and presentation.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-4 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

EARTHSYS 135A: Podcasting the Anthropocene 1.0

The Anthropocene refers to the proposed geologic age defined by the global footprint of humankind. It's an acknowledgement of the tremendous influence people and societies exert on Earth systems. In this course, students research, prepare, and conduct audio interviews related to the Anthropocene with experts of their choosing. Instructors will help facilitate interviews and prepare student for the experience. Throughout the quarter students will participate in group workshops. This is a project-based course resulting in two long-form interviews. The expectation at the end of the quarter is to publish interviews via the Generation Anthropocene podcast, with possible opportunities to cross post in collaboration with external media partners. Students hoping to take EarthSys 135/235 during winter quarter are strongly encouraged to enroll in EarthSys 135A/235A. (Cardinal Course certified by the Haas Center).
Terms: not given this year | Units: 1-2 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

EARTHSYS 136: The Ethics of Stewardship (EARTHSYS 236)

What responsibilities do humans have to nonhuman nature and future generations? How are human communities and individuals shaped by their relationships with the natural world? What are the social, political, and moral ramifications of drawing sustenance and wealth from natural resources? Whether we realize it or not, we grapple with such questions every time we turn on the tap, fuel up cars, or eat meals -and they are key to addressing issues like global climate change and environmental justice. In this class, we consider several perspectives on this ethical question of stewardship: the role of humans in the global environment. In addition to reading written work and speaking with land stewards, we will practice stewardship at the Stanford Educational Farm. This course must be taken for a minimum of 3 units and a letter grade to be eligible for Ways credit.
Terms: Aut, Spr | Units: 2-3 | UG Reqs: WAY-ER | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

EARTHSYS 139: Ecosystem Services: Frontiers in the Science of Valuing Nature (BIO 138, BIO 238, EARTHSYS 239)

This advanced course explores the science of valuing nature, beginning with its historical origins, and then its recent development in natural (especially ecological), economic, psychological, and other social sciences. We will use the ecosystem services framework (characterizing benefits from ecosystems to people) to define the state of knowledge, core methods of analysis, and research frontiers, such as at the interface with biodiversity, resilience, human health, and human development. Intended for diverse students, with a focus on research and real-world cases. To apply, please email the instructor (gdaily@stanford.edu) with a brief description of your background and research interests.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

EARTHSYS 144: Fundamentals of Geographic Information Science (GIS) (ESS 164)

Survey of geographic information including maps, satellite imagery, and census data, approaches to spatial data, and tools for integrating and examining spatially-explicit data. Emphasis is on fundamental concepts of geographic information science and associated technologies. Topics include geographic data structure, cartography, remotely sensed data, statistical analysis of geographic data, spatial analysis, map design, and geographic information system software. Computer lab assignments. All students are required to attend a weekly lab session.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-4 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

EARTHSYS 148: Grow it, Cook it, Eat it. An Experiential Exploration of How and Why We Eat What We Eat

This course provides an introductory exploration of the social, cultural, and economic forces that influence contemporary human diets. Through the combination of interrelated lectures by expert practitioners and hands-on experience planting, tending, harvesting, cooking, and eating food from Stanford's dining hall gardens, students will learn to think critically about modern agricultural practices and the relationship between cuisine and human and ecological health outcomes. Students will also learn and apply basic practices of human-centered design to develop simple frameworks for understanding various eating behaviors in Stanford¿s dining halls and to develop and test hypotheses for how R&DE Stanford Dining might influence eating behaviors to effect better health outcomes for people and the planet. This class, which is offered through the FEED Collaborative in the School of Earth, Energy and Environmental Sciences, requires an application. For more information about the FEED Collaborative, application procedures and deadlines, and other classes we teach, please visit our website at http://feedcollaborative.org.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

EARTHSYS 160: Sustainable Cities (URBANST 164)

Service-learning course that exposes students to sustainability concepts and urban planning as a tool for determining sustainable outcomes in the Bay Area. Focus will be on the relationship of land use and transportation planning to housing and employment patterns, mobility, public health, and social equity. Topics will include government initiatives to counteract urban sprawl and promote smart growth and livability, political realities of organizing and building coalitions around sustainability goals, and increasing opportunities for low-income and communities of color to achieve sustainability outcomes. Students will participate in team-based projects in collaboration with local community partners and take part in significant off-site fieldwork. Prerequisites: consent of the instructor. (Cardinal Course certified by the Haas Center.)
Terms: Aut | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Chan, D. (PI)

EARTHSYS 162: Data for Sustainable Development (CS 325B, EARTHSYS 262)

The sustainable development goals (SDGs) encompass many important aspects of human and ecosystem well-being that are traditionally difficult to measure. This project-based course will focus on ways to use inexpensive, unconventional data streams to measure outcomes relevant to SDGs, including poverty, hunger, health, governance, and economic activity. Students will apply machine learning techniques to various projects outlined at the beginning of the quarter. The main learning goals are to gain experience conducting and communicating original research. Prior knowledge of machine learning techniques, such as from CS 221, CS 229, CS 231N, STATS 202, or STATS 216 is required. Open to both undergraduate and graduate students. Enrollment limited to 24. Students must apply for the class by filling out the form at https://goo.gl/forms/9LSZF7lPkHadix5D3. A permission code will be given to admitted students to register for the class.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 3-5 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

EARTHSYS 176: Open Space Management Practicum (EARTHSYS 276)

The unique patchwork of urban-to-rural land uses, property ownership, and ecosystems in our region poses numerous challenges and opportunities for regional conservation and environmental stewardship. Students in this class will address a particular challenge through a faculty-mentored research project engaged with the Peninsula Open Space Trust, Acterra, or the Amah Mutsun Land Trust that focuses on open space management. By focusing on a project driven by the needs of these organizations and carried out through engagement with the community, and with thorough reflection, study, and discussion about the roles of scientific, economic, and policy research in local-scale environmental decision-making, students will explore the underlying challenges and complexities of what it means to actually do community-engaged research for conservation and open space preservation in the real world. As such, this course will provide students with skills and experience in research design in conservation biology and ecology, community and stakeholder engagement, land use policy and planning, and the practical aspects of land and environmental management.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

EARTHSYS 182: Designing Educational Gardens (ESS 282)

A project-based course emphasizing 'ways of doing 's sustainable agricultural systems based at the new Stanford Educational Farm. Students will work individually and in small groups on the design of a new educational garden and related programs for the Stanford Educational Farm. The class will meet on 6 Fridays over the course of winter quarter. Class meetings will include an introduction to designing learning gardens and affiliated programs, 3 field trips to exemplary educational gardens in the bay area that will include tours and discussions with garden educators, and work sessions for student projects. By application only.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 2 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
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