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1 - 10 of 16 results for: FRENCH ; Currently searching autumn courses. You can expand your search to include all quarters

FRENCH 87N: The New Wave: How The French Reinvented Cinema

Focus on the French New Wave's cinematic revolution of 1959-1962. In a few years, the Nouvelle Vague delivered landmark works such as Truffaut's 400 Blows, Godard's Breathless, Chabro's Le Beau Serge or Resnais' Hiroshima mon amour, and changed forever the way we make and think about movies. Why did these films look so radically fresh? What do they say about France's youth culture in the early 60s? How is the author's theory behind them still influencing us today? Focus is on cultural history, aesthetic analysis, interpretation of narrative, sound and visual forms. Taught in English. NOTE: Class meets Tuesday/Thursday 12:00-1:20pm; film screenings Monday 6:00-8:30pm
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-4 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Alduy, C. (PI)

FRENCH 121: Jean-Jacques Rousseau: Politics, Philosophy, and Literature

"Man is born free, and everywhere he is in chains." This seminar explores the work of one of the most important and enigmatic thinkers about the problems of modern society: Jean-Jacques Rousseau. Students will read a selection of his most important works in dialogue with other important thinkers of his time including Diderot, d'Alembert, and Voltaire. They will grapple with Rousseau's political philosophy, especially his critique of modernity in the Discourse on the Origins of Inequality and his vision for remaking politics in The Social Contract, as well as his moral philosophy and views on education in Emile. We will discuss Rousseau's landmark contributions to later debates about authenticity, transparency, and self-interest, but also his troubling views on gender. The class will conclude with Rousseau's late works, which saw him turn against his friends in a paranoid struggle with his celebrity avatar "Jean-Jacques," the darling of the new media culture of his age. Taught in French.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Pesic, A. (PI)

FRENCH 130: Introduction to Medieval and Renaissance French Literature

Introduction to the Middle Ages and the Renaissance. The birth of a national literature and its evolution. Literature as addressing cultural, philosophical, and artistic issues which question assumptions on love, ethics, art, and the nature of the self. Readings: epics (La Chanson de Roland), medieval romances (Tristan, Chrétien de Troyes' Yvain), post-Petrarchan poetics (Du Bellay, Ronsard, Labé), and prose humanists (Rabelais, Montaigne). Taught in French. Prerequisite: FRENLANG 124 or consent of instructor.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Tresfels, C. (PI)

FRENCH 181: Philosophy and Literature (CLASSICS 42, COMPLIT 181, ENGLISH 81, GERMAN 181, ITALIAN 181, PHIL 81, SLAVIC 181)

What, if anything, does reading literature do for our lives? What can literature offer that other forms of writing cannot? Can fictions teach us anything? Can they make people more moral? Why do we take pleasure in tragic stories? This course introduces students to major problems at the intersection of philosophy and literature. It addresses key questions about the value of literature, philosophical puzzles about the nature of fiction and literary language, and ways that philosophy and literature interact. Readings span literature, film, and philosophical theories of art. Authors may include Sophocles, Dickinson, Toni Morrison, Proust, Woolf, Walton, Nietzsche, and Sartre. Students master close reading techniques and philosophical analysis, and write papers combining the two. This is the required gateway course for the Philosophy and Literature major tracks. Majors should register in their home department.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

FRENCH 199: Individual Work

Restricted to French majors with consent of department. Normally limited to 4-unit credit toward the major. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-12 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

FRENCH 236: Casablanca - Algiers - Tunis : Cities on the Edge (FRENCH 336, URBANST 140F)

From the North Africans who dream of Europe, to the Euro-Americans who dream of North Africa, Casablanca, Algiers and Tunis symbolize three territories, real and imaginary, which never cease to inspire and challenge the preconceptions of travelers setting sight on their shores. In this class, we will explore the myriad ways in which these three emblematic cities of North Africa on the edge of Europe and Africa, cultivate a "je-ne-sais-quoi" of literary and cinematographic mystery. They are an ebullient laboratory of social, political, religious, and cultural issues, past and present, from the Algerian War to the Arab Spring, from the refuge of the outcast to the migrant plight of the "harragas" crossing the Mediterranean. Primary materials for this course will consist of literary, visual, sociological, and historical documents. Taught in English.nnn"Play it again, Sam" : Casablanca is synonymous with one of the most iconic films in Hollywood history and the most quoted lines in cinema. more »
From the North Africans who dream of Europe, to the Euro-Americans who dream of North Africa, Casablanca, Algiers and Tunis symbolize three territories, real and imaginary, which never cease to inspire and challenge the preconceptions of travelers setting sight on their shores. In this class, we will explore the myriad ways in which these three emblematic cities of North Africa on the edge of Europe and Africa, cultivate a "je-ne-sais-quoi" of literary and cinematographic mystery. They are an ebullient laboratory of social, political, religious, and cultural issues, past and present, from the Algerian War to the Arab Spring, from the refuge of the outcast to the migrant plight of the "harragas" crossing the Mediterranean. Primary materials for this course will consist of literary, visual, sociological, and historical documents. Taught in English.nnn"Play it again, Sam" : Casablanca is synonymous with one of the most iconic films in Hollywood history and the most quoted lines in cinema. We will explore the reality behind the myth, "Casanegra" behind "Casablanca."n nFrom "Algiers the White" to "Algiers the Red", Algiers has nourished the fertile imagination of writers, filmmakers, political activists from Albert Camus to Che Guevara, from Assia Djebar to the Black Panthers.n nTunis has constantly attracted writers and filmmakers alike, from Guy de Maupassant to Moufida Tlatli, from Albert Memmi to JR.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Ulloa, M. (PI)

FRENCH 244: The Enlightenment (DLCL 324, HISTORY 234, HISTORY 334, HISTORY 432A, HUMNTIES 324)

The Enlightenment as a philosophical, literary, and political movement. Themes include the nature and limits of philosophy, the grounds for critical intellectual engagement, the institution of society and the public, and freedom, equality and human progress. Authors include Voltaire, Montesquieu, Rousseau, Hume, Diderot, and Condorcet.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

FRENCH 279: How the French Reinvented Cinema: The New Wave (FRENCH 379)

Focus on the French New Wave's cinematic revolution of 1959-1962. In a few years, the Nouvelle Vague delivered landmark works such as Truffaut's 400 Blows, Godard's Breathless, Chabrol's Le Beau Serge or Resnais' Hiroshima mon amour, and changed forever the way we make and think about movies. Why did these films look so radically fresh? What do they say about France's youth culture in the early 60s? How is the author's theory behind them still influencing us today? Focus is on cultural history, aesthetic analysis, interpretation of narrative, sound and visual forms. Graduate and Junior/Senoir level. Taught in English. NOTE: Class meets Thursday 1:30-4:20pm; film screenings Monday 6:00-8:30pm
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Alduy, C. (PI)

FRENCH 307: How to Build an Empire: Race and Religion in Imperial France (FRENCH 207)

This class will explore the French Empire through race and religion, and examine its specificity vis-a-vis the history of other European empires. How do we think historically about the relationships between nation, Republic and empire? This course will draw from literary, political, philosophical and anthropological texts to introduce students to key notions and concepts debated in France and the francophone world. Readings bear on the nature of nation and citizenship, the tension between republic and empire, the dynamics of universalism and particularism, changing discourses of race, and the role of religion in the nation-state.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Marcus, E. (PI)
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