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1 - 10 of 15 results for: FINANCE ; Currently searching autumn courses. You can expand your search to include all quarters

FINANCE 229: MSx: Finance

This course covers the foundations of corporate finance including the management of capital structure, financial forecasting, dividend policy, financial distress, cost of capital and capital budgeting. It discusses the major financial decisions made by corporate managers and the impact of those decisions on investors and the value of the firm. Topics include criteria for understanding the valuation of financial assets and liabilities, relationships between risk and return, market efficiency, and the role of derivative securities, including options. The course also provides coverage of the role of financial markets in the operations of the firm.
Units: 3 | Grading: GSB Letter Graded

FINANCE 315: Innovating for Financial Inclusion

This is a new MBA elective exploring innovative ways start-ups are altering household participation in financial services, by overcoming financial frictions and/or changing behaviors. "Inclusion"€ will be viewed broadly to encompass individuals/households from all socioeconomic classes in all aspects of their financial lives. The focus will be predominantly on start-ups that are disrupting financial services within the US legal and regulatory environment, though we will frequently draw upon lessons learned from welfare-enhancing innovations in the international FinTech sphere.
Units: 3 | Grading: GSB Letter Graded

FINANCE 319: Private Equity Investing Seminar

This PE Investing seminar launched in 1993 focuses on private equity investing, including investments with control, buyouts, and minority investments at various stages in a company's life. Private equity investing activity has grown significantly over the past 2 decades. This seminar explores selected topics in private equity investing for those MBA students who take the co-requisite course FINANCE 321.01, Investment Management and Entrepreneurial Finance. Private equity includes both established and early stage companies. The course extends and deepens the entrepreneurial finance area for those with an interest in private equity, venture capital and principal investing, taking a global view. Utilization will be made of original case studies and lecture-discussions, building on the framework of FINANCE 321. The Seminar meets with many outstanding investors. All those registered in F321.01 will also be registered in F319. See yellow Term Sheet put in MBA Boxes in late April. Note: All those registered in F321.02 will also be registered in F329.
Units: 4 | Grading: GSB Pass/Fail
Instructors: McDonald, J. (PI)

FINANCE 321: Investment Management and Entrepreneurial Finance

Our focus is fundamental value investing. Equity investment in companies, common stocks, early/growth stage ventures and private equity, deals, partnerships, hedge funds, or other entrepreneurial opportunities will be immediately or eventually important for most MBAs--either on the investing side or on the fund-raising financing side. This investment course discusses many practical and conceptual factors influencing the analysis and value of companies and deals, including publicly listed and private equity investments, and on success of investment approaches. The focus of this course is on quoted and private equity investments and on entrepreneurial finance. The format of the class is primarily case discussions and lecture discussions led by the professor and investors/principals who were involved in the case. This course enables MBA students to learn a broad investing skill-set and to study outstanding investors. See yellow Term Sheet put in MBA Boxes in late April.
Units: 3 | Grading: GSB Letter Graded
Instructors: McDonald, J. (PI)

FINANCE 329: Investment Seminar

F329 - Investment Seminar: "Global Principal Investing/Hedge Funds" is a seminar focused on selected topics in masterful investing in publicly traded with some private equity capital investments, with emphasis on the principal's point of view. We study hedge funds and mutual funds and meet with outstanding investors. The scope and context is global including emerging markets. The Seminar is taught by a founding director of one of the largest international investment funds. See yellow Term Sheet put in MBA Boxes in late April. All those registered in F321.02 will also be registered in F329. nnNote: All those registered in F321.01 will also be registered in F319.
Units: 4 | Grading: GSB Pass/Fail
Instructors: McDonald, J. (PI)

FINANCE 377: China's Financial System

This course is a survey of China's financial system, including its banking industry, monetary policy structure, and financial markets (bonds, derivatives, equities, foreign exchange, alternative asset management, and related markets). The goal is an integrated view of how capital, risk, and liquidity are intermediated within China and cross-border. Current trends (including liberalization of markets) will be emphasized. Coverage will be through lectures, reading of both primary source documents and secondary (journalistic and analyst) commentary, as well as a range of subject-matter-expert speakers. Using our special High Immersion Classrooms at Stanford and at the Stanford Center at PKU, this course meets jointly with a parallel course offered at Beijing University. Students will participate actively in class discussion, make a 5-minute topical presentation, and submit a short (10-page) paper.
Units: 3 | Grading: GSB Letter Graded
Instructors: Duffie, D. (PI)

FINANCE 385: Angel and Venture Capital Financing for Entrepreneurs and Investors

This course covers all the stages of funding for early stage high-growth companies, from seed funding to venture capital rounds to a successful exit. We will concentrate on how entrepreneurs and investors make and should make important decisions. Examples of issues that we will cover are: How can entrepreneurs raise funding successfully? What are typical mistakes entrepreneurs make in raising capital and negotiating with investors? How to choose your investor? How to pitch to an investor? How do angels and VCs generate and process their deal flow and select companies? How are VCs involved in business decisions such as recruiting talent and replacing CEOs? What are the important provisions of financial contracts between VCs and founders? How to value early-stage companies? The course is very applied and mostly case-based. We will discuss a lot of nitty-gritty details that is a must for founders and investors. Case protagonists, founders, angels, and VCs will be among guest speakers. No prior knowledge of the VC industry is needed.
Units: 3 | Grading: GSB Letter Graded

FINANCE 620: Financial Markets I

This course is an introductory PhD level course in financial economics. We begin with individual choice under uncertainty, then move on to equilibrium models, the stochastic discount factor methodology, and no-arbitrage pricing. We will also address some empirical puzzles relating to asset markets, and explore the models that have been developed to try to explain them.
Units: 3 | Grading: GSB Letter Graded
Instructors: Hebert, B. (PI)

FINANCE 622: Dynamic Asset Pricing Theory

This course is an introduction to multiperiod models in finance, mainly pertaining to optimal portfolio choice and asset pricing. The course begins with discrete-time models for portfolio choice and security prices, and then moves to a continuous-time setting. The topics then covered include advanced derivative pricing models, models of the term structure of interest rates, the valuation of corporate securities, portfolio choice in continuous-time settings, and finally general-equilibrium and over-the-counter asset pricing models. Students should have had some previous exposure to general equilibrium theory and some basic courses in investments. Strong backgrounds in calculus, linear algebra, and probability theory are recommended. Problem assignments are frequent and, for most students, demanding. Prerequisite: F620 and MGTECON600 (or equivalent), or permission of instructor.
Units: 4 | Grading: GSB Letter Graded
Instructors: Duffie, D. (PI)

FINANCE 637: Macroeconomics and Financial Markets

This PhD course will cover research topics at the boundary between macroeconomics and finance. Topics will include the study of macroeconomic models with financial frictions, the term structure of interest rates, conventional and unconventional monetary policy, sovereign debt crises, search frictions and segmentation in housing markets, (over)leveraging by households, heterogeneous expectations, excess volatility, financial bubbles and crises. Student presentations and course paper requirement. Designed for second year PhD students in economics or finance.
Units: 3 | Grading: GSB Letter Graded
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