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1 - 10 of 25 results for: FEMGEN ; Currently searching autumn courses. You can expand your search to include all quarters

FEMGEN 13N: Women Making Music (MUSIC 14N)

Preference to freshmen. Women's musical activities across times and cultures; how ideas about gender influence the creation, performance, and perception of music.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-Gender, WAY-A-II, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Hadlock, H. (PI)

FEMGEN 94H: Introduction to Disability Studies and Disability Rights (ETHICSOC 104X, HUMRTS 104, SOC 186)

Disability Studies is a relatively new interdisciplinary academic field that examines disability as a social, cultural and political phenomenon. This is an introductory course to the field of disability studies and it aims to investigate the complex concept of disability through a variety of prisms and disciplines including social psychology, the humanities, legal studies and media studies. This course also focuses on the multiple connections between the study of disability and other identities including class, race, ethnicity, gender and sexual orientation, and also includes a comparative look at how disability is treated across cultures. Some of the topics covered in the class are disability and the family, the history of the disability rights movement, the development of disability identity and its intersectionality, antidiscrimination law, the UN Convention on the Rights of People with Disabilities, bioethical dilemmas pertaining to disability and more.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Dorfman, D. (PI)

FEMGEN 99: Seeds of Change

This course is a required training for student leaders of the Seeds of Change initiative. This initiative takes an interdisciplinary approach to STEM education, infusing students¿ technical training with leadership training through a lens of gender inequality - bringing together key components of feminist pedagogy, service-learning, and experiential education to create a transformational learning experience. In this three-quarter course (Fall, Winter, Spring), student leaders will: learn the core content featured in the Seeds of Change curriculum, reflect on their experiences as both learners and teachers of this content, hone their own leadership and group facilitation skills, and engage as researchers in the initiative¿s evaluation efforts. NOTE: Instructor Consent Required. Please email kpedersen@stanford.edu
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

FEMGEN 102: Art and Social Criticism (AFRICAAM 102B, AMSTUD 102, ARTHIST 162B, CSRE 102A)

Visual artists have long been in the forefront of social criticism in America. Since the 1960s, various visual strategies have helped emergent progressive political movements articulate and represent complex social issues. Which artists and particular art works/projects have become key anchors for discourses on racism, sexism, economic and social inequality, immigrant rights and climate change? We will learn about a spectrum of political art designed to raise social awareness, spark social change and rouse protest. The Art Workers Coalition¿s agit-prop opposing the Vietnam War and ACT-UP¿s emblematic signs and symbols during the AIDS/HIV crisis of the 1980s galvanized a generation into action. Works such as Judy Chicago¿s The Dinner Party (1979), Fred Wilson¿s Mining the Museum (1992), and Glenn Ligon¿s paintings appropriating fragments from African-American literature all raised awareness by excavating historical evidence of the long legacy resisting marginalization. For three decades more »
Visual artists have long been in the forefront of social criticism in America. Since the 1960s, various visual strategies have helped emergent progressive political movements articulate and represent complex social issues. Which artists and particular art works/projects have become key anchors for discourses on racism, sexism, economic and social inequality, immigrant rights and climate change? We will learn about a spectrum of political art designed to raise social awareness, spark social change and rouse protest. The Art Workers Coalition¿s agit-prop opposing the Vietnam War and ACT-UP¿s emblematic signs and symbols during the AIDS/HIV crisis of the 1980s galvanized a generation into action. Works such as Judy Chicago¿s The Dinner Party (1979), Fred Wilson¿s Mining the Museum (1992), and Glenn Ligon¿s paintings appropriating fragments from African-American literature all raised awareness by excavating historical evidence of the long legacy resisting marginalization. For three decades feminist artists Barbara Kruger and the Guerilla Girls have combined institutional critique and direct address into a provocative form of criticality. Recent art for social justice is reaching ever broadening publics by redrawing the role of artist and audience exemplified by the democratization of poster making and internet campaigns of Occupy and the Movement for Black Lives. We will also consider the collective aesthetic activisms in the Post-Occupy era including Global Ultra Luxury Faction, Climate Justice art projects, and the visual culture of Trump era mass protests. Why are each of these examples successful as influential and enduring markers of social criticism? What have these socially responsive practices contributed to our understanding of American history?
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Hertz, B. (PI)

FEMGEN 103S: Gender in Native American Societies (CSRE 103S, NATIVEAM 103S)

Seminar examines the impact of colonialism on gender roles & gender relations in American Indian communities beginning with the 17th century to the present. Topics include demographic changes; social, political & economic transformations associated with biological & spiritual assaults; the dynamism & diversity of native societies. Sources include history, ethnography, biography, autobiography, the novel & film.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:EC-Gender, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Anderson, J. (PI)

FEMGEN 104B: Senior Seminar and Practicum

Required for Feminist Studies majors. Non-majors enrolled with consent of instructor. Students develop oral reports on their practicum and its relationship to their academic work, submit a report draft and revised written analysis of the practicum, and discuss applications of feminist scholarship. May be repeated once for credit.
Terms: Aut | Units: 2 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: Hanlon, P. (PI)

FEMGEN 105: Honors Work

(Staff)
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-15 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

FEMGEN 107G: Sisterhood, Brotherhood, & Gender Identity: The Histories, Stories, and Constructs of Greek Life

In this course, we will explore the history, the development, the critiques and praise of sororities and fraternities. We¿ll pay particular attention to how gender and sexuality are framed in those discussions¿ones by outsiders as well as ones by insiders. How do Greek organizations present their activities and goals? What values and roles do they highlight during recruitment? Who joins them? What expectations are there for participants? What are the perceived benefits that come with joining? What does it mean to be a ¿fraternity brother¿ or a ¿sorority sister¿ in modern Greek organizations? How are sorority women and fraternity men discussed by outsiders? How do the stereotypes of Greek life impact perceptions of individuals as well as particular sororities and fraternities? To consider these questions, we¿ll look at historical documents and analyze how groups described themselves as they were establishing; we¿ll also analyze recent documents (websites, books, etc.) to consider current ways organizations describe themselves, their activities, and their values. We¿ll use both to consider how the messages created by and about Greek organizations shape public perceptions as well as individuals¿ experiences of gender and sexuality identity.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

FEMGEN 108: Internship in Feminist Studies

Supervised field, community, or lab experience in law offices, medical research and labs, social service agencies, legislative and other public offices, or local and national organizations that address issues related to gender and/or sexuality. One unit represents approximately three hours work per week. Required paper. May be repeated for credit. Service Learning Course (certified by Haas Center). Feminist, Gender, and Sexuality Majors may not receive 108 credit for their required practicum, as they are to sign up for FEMGEN 104 A & B instead. Prerequisites: Course work in Feminist, Gender, and Sexuality Studies, written proposal and application form submitted for approval by program office, written consent of faculty sponsor. Course may be taken 3 times total, for a max of 15 units.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-5 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
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