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1 - 10 of 36 results for: EARTHSYS ; Currently searching autumn courses. You can expand your search to include all quarters

EARTHSYS 4: Coevolution of Earth and Life (GEOLSCI 4)

Earth is the only planet in the universe currently known to harbor life. When and how did Earth become inhabited? How have biological activities altered the planet? How have environmental changes affected the evolution of life? Are we living in a sixth mass extinction? In this course, we will develop and use the tools of geology, paleontology, geochemistry, and modeling that allow us to reconstruct Earth's 4.5 billion year history and to reconstruct the interactions between life and its host planet over the past 4 billion years. We will also ask what this long history can tell us about life's likely future on Earth. We will also use One half-day field trip.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

EARTHSYS 10: Introduction to Earth Systems

For non-majors and prospective Earth Systems majors. Multidisciplinary approach using the principles of geology, biology, engineering, and economics to describe how the Earth operates as an interconnected, integrated system. Goal is to understand global change on all time scales. Focus is on sciences, technological principles, and sociopolitical approaches applied to solid earth, oceans, water, energy, and food and population. Case studies: environmental degradation, loss of biodiversity, and resource sustainability.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

EARTHSYS 41N: The Global Warming Paradox

Preference to freshman. Focus is on the complex climate challenges posed by the substantial benefits of energy consumption, including the critical tension between the enormous global demand for increased human well-being and the negative climate consequences of large-scale emissions of carbon dioxide. Topics include: Earth¿s energy balance; detection and attribution of climate change; the climate response to enhanced greenhouse forcing; impacts of climate change on natural and human systems; and proposed methods for curbing further climate change. Sources include peer-reviewed scientific papers, current research results, and portrayal of scientific findings by the mass media and social networks.
Terms: Aut, Sum | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

EARTHSYS 91: Earth Systems Writers Collective

Come join a community of environmental writers, publish your work, and get course credit at the same time! Are you currently working on an article, an op-ed, translating your class projects into publishable pieces or pursuing a new writing project? Are you interested in publishing your work in the quarterly Earth Systems newsletter and the annual Earth Systems magazine? In this weekly seminar, you will collaborate with others and get constructive feedback from a community of peer writers. You can enroll in the Earth Systems Writers Collective for 1 or 2 units, or just join without signing up for course credit. May be repeat for credit
Terms: Aut, Win | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Polk, E. (PI)

EARTHSYS 95: Liberation Through Land: Organic Gardening and Racial Justice (CSRE 95)

Through field trips, practical work and readings, this course provides students with the tools to begin cultivating a relationship to land that focuses on direct engagement with sustainable gardening, from seed to harvest. The course will take place on the O'Donohue Family Stanford Educational Farm, where students will be given the opportunity to learn how to sow seeds, prepare garden beds, amend soils, build compost, and take care of plants. The history of forced farm labor in the U.S., from slavery to low-wage migrant labor, means that many people of color encounter agricultural spaces as sites of trauma and oppression. In this course we will explore the potential for revisiting a narrative of peaceful relation to land and crop that existed long before the trauma occurred, acknowledging the beautiful history of POC coexistence with land. Since this is a practical course, there will be a strong emphasis on participation. Application available at https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLScdKKp7mtTNzS0-qc-La97LPj9w8SsWNZ5xrAYVjiKTR86F6Q/viewform?usp=sf_link; deadline to apply is September 19, 2017, at midnight. The course is co-sponsored by the Institute for Diversity in the Arts (IDA) and the Earth Systems Program.
Terms: Aut | Units: 2 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

EARTHSYS 100: Environmental and Geological Field Studies in the Rocky Mountains (ESS 101)

Three-week, field-based program in the Greater Yellowstone/Teton and Wind River Mountains of Wyoming. Field-based exercises covering topics including: basics of structural geology and petrology; glacial geology; western cordillera geology; paleoclimatology; chemical weathering; aqueous geochemistry; and environmental issues such as acid mine drainage and changing land-use patterns.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

EARTHSYS 103: Understanding Energy (CEE 107A, CEE 207A)

Energy is a fundamental driver of human development and opportunity. At the same time, our energy system has significant consequences for our society, political system, economy, and environment. For example, energy production and use is the number one source of greenhouse gas emissions. In taking this course, students will not only understand the fundamentals of each energy resource -- including significance and potential, conversion processes and technologies, drivers and barriers, policy and regulation, and social, economic, and environmental impacts -- students will also be able to put this in the context of the broader energy system and think critically about how and why society has chosen particular energy resources. Both depletable and renewable energy resources are covered, including oil, natural gas, coal, nuclear, biomass and biofuel, hydroelectric, wind, solar thermal and photovoltaics (PV), geothermal, and ocean energy, with cross-cutting topics including electricity, storage, climate change, sustainability, green buildings, energy efficiency, transportation, and the developing world. The course is 4 units, which includes lecture and in-class discussion, readings and videos, assignments, and two off-site field trips. Enroll for 5 units to also attend the Workshop, an interactive discussion section on cross-cutting topics that meets once per week for 80 minutes (timing TBD based on student schedules). The 3-unit option requires instructor approval - please contact Diana Ginnebaugh. Website: http://web.stanford.edu/class/cee207a/ Course was formerly called Energy Resources.nPrerequisites: Algebra. May not be taken for credit by students who have completed CEE 107S.
Terms: Aut, Spr | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

EARTHSYS 106D: New meat: The Science Behind Scalable Alternatives to Animal Products

Plant-based meat products and the technologies used to produce them have increased in complexity from tofu (~200 BC) and wheat gluten-based meat replacements (6th century AD) to the Beyond Burger and the Impossible Burger (both 2016), which use mechanically extracted plant proteins and genetically engineered yeast producing soy leghemoglobin, respectively. This course will cover the scientific challenges and processes used to create convincing and marketable plant-based and clean meats, including the biological and chemical processes used to produce plant-based meat and clean meat; the environmental and economic drivers behind the market for meat replacements; and the dietary roles of plant- and animal-based proteins. This course is intended for undergraduates interested in learning about the technical and scientific developments involved in the production of clean and plant-based meat. Students should be familiar with introductory biology and chemistry.
Terms: Aut | Units: 2 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Berke, A. (PI)

EARTHSYS 112: Human Society and Environmental Change (ESS 112, HISTORY 103D)

Interdisciplinary approaches to understanding human-environment interactions with a focus on economics, policy, culture, history, and the role of the state. Prerequisite: ECON 1.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

EARTHSYS 116: Ecology of the Hawaiian Islands (BIO 116)

Terrestrial and marine ecology and conservation biology of the Hawaiian Archipelago. Taught in the field in Hawaii as part of quarter-long sequence of courses including Earth Sciences and Anthropology. Topics include ecological succession, plant-soil interactions, conservation biology, biological invasions and ecosystem consequences, and coral reef ecology. Restricted to students accepted into the Earth Systems of Hawaii Program.
Terms: Aut, alternate years, not given next year | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
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