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1 - 10 of 38 results for: BIO ; Currently searching autumn courses. You can expand your search to include all quarters

BIO 3: Frontiers in Marine Biology

An introduction to contemporary research in marine biology, including ecology, conservation biology, environmental toxicology, behavior, biomechanics, evolution, neurobiology, and molecular biology. Emphasis is on new discoveries and the technologies used to make them. Weekly lectures by faculty from the Hopkins Marine Station.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: Thompson, S. (PI)

BIO 12N: Sensory Ecology of Marine Animals

Animals living in the oceans experience a highly varied range of environmental stimuli. An aquatic lifestyle requires an equally rich range of sensory adaptations, including some that are totally foreign to us. In this course we will examine sensory system in marine animals from both an environmental and behavioral perspective and from the point of view of neuroscience and information systems engineering.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Thompson, S. (PI)

BIO 34N: Hunger

The biology of hunger and satiety, disease states that disrupt normal responses to hunger and satiety, starvation responses and adaptations to starvation in a variety of organisms, food production and distribution mechanisms, historic famines and their causes, the challenges of providing adequate food and energy for the Earth's growing population, local and global efforts to alleviate hunger, and hunger in fiction.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

BIO 45: Introduction to Laboratory Research in Cell and Molecular Biology

Investigate yeast strains that are engineered to express the human tumor suppressor protein, p53, and use modern molecular methods to identify the functional consequences of p53 mutations isolated from tumor cells. Learn about the protein's role as Guardian of the Genome through lectures and by reading and discussing journal articles. Use molecular visualization programs to examine the structure of normal and mutant p53 proteins. Assay the ability of mutant p53 to direct expression of several reporter genes. During guided reflection, investigate further and identify what could be wrong with the p53 mutants you have been studying. Conduct lab experiments to test hypotheses, analyze data, and present your findings through a team oral presentation, as well as a scientific poster. There are no pre-requisites for this course. However, having taken CHEM 31X, or 31A and B, and 33 and being concurrently enrolled or past enrollment in Biology or Human Biology core will help. Note: This class has a $25 course fee.
Terms: Aut, Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-SMA | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

BIO 61: Science as a Creative Process (APPPHYS 61)

What is the process of science, and why does creativity matter? We'll delve deeply into the applicability of science in addressing a vast range of real-world problems. This course is designed to teach the scientific method as it's actually practiced by working scientists. It will cover how to ask a well-posed question, how to design a good experiment, how to collect and interpret quantitative data, how to recover from error, and how to communicate findings. Facts matter! Course topics will include experimental design, statistics and statistical significance, formulating appropriate controls, modeling, peer review, and more. The course will incorporate a significant hands-on component featuring device fabrication, testing, and measurement. Among other "Dorm Science" activities, we'll be distributing Arduino microcontroller kits and electronic sensors, then use these items, along with other materials, to complete a variety of group and individual projects outside the classroom. The final course assignment will be to develop and write a scientific grant proposal to test a student-selected myth or scientific controversy. Although helpful, no prior experience with electronics or computer programming is required. Recommended for freshmen.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-AQR, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

BIO 81: Introduction to Ecology

This course will introduce you to the first principles of the science of ecology, the study of interactions between organisms and their environment. Prerequisites: None.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

BIO 82: Genetics

The focus of the course is on the basic mechanisms underlying the transmission of genetic information and on the use of genetic analysis to study biological and medical questions. Major topics will include: (1) the use of existing genetic variation in humans and other species to identify genes that play an important role in determining traits and disease-susceptibility, (2) the analysis of mutations in model organisms and their use in the investigation of biological processes and questions and (3) using genetic information for diagnosis and the potential for genetic manipulations to treat disease. Prerequisites: None.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

BIO 119: Evolution of Marine Ecosystems (EARTHSYS 122, GS 123, GS 223B)

Life originally evolved in the ocean. When, why, and how did the major transitions occur in the history of marine life? What triggered the rapid evolution and diversification of animals in the Cambrian, after more than 3.5 billion years of Earth's history? What caused Earth's major mass extinction events? How do ancient extinction events compare to current threats to marine ecosystems? How has the evolution of primary producers impacted animals, and how has animal evolution impacted primary producers? In this course, we will review the latest evidence regarding these major questions in the history of marine ecosystems. We will develop familiarity with the most common groups of marine animal fossils. We will also conduct original analyses of paleontological data, developing skills both in the framing and testing of scientific hypotheses and in data analysis and presentation.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-4 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

BIO 125: Ecophysiology and Land Surface Processes (ESS 123, ESS 223)

Ecological and physical processes of ecosystem function, spanning from the micrometer scale of plant physiological processes to the ecosystem and global scale. Emphasizes interactions between ecological processes and the physical world at the land surface and in the atmosphere.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Konings, A. (PI)

BIO 138: Ecosystem Services: Frontiers in the Science of Valuing Nature (BIO 238, EARTHSYS 139, EARTHSYS 239)

This advanced course explores the science of valuing nature, beginning with its historical origins, and then its recent development in natural (especially ecological), economic, psychological, and other social sciences. We will use the ecosystem services framework (characterizing benefits from ecosystems to people) to define the state of knowledge, core methods of analysis, and research frontiers, such as at the interface with biodiversity, resilience, human health, and human development. Intended for diverse students, with a focus on research and real-world cases. To apply, please email the instructor (gdaily@stanford.edu) with a brief description of your background and research interests.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
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