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1 - 10 of 22 results for: AA ; Currently searching autumn courses. You can expand your search to include all quarters

AA 100: Introduction to Aeronautics and Astronautics

This class introduces the basics of aeronautics and astronautics through applied physics, hands-on activities, and real world examples. The principles of fluid flow, flight, and propulsion for aircraft will be illustrated, including the creation of lift and drag, aerodynamic performance including takeoff, climb, range, and landing. The principles of orbits, maneuvers, space environment, and propulsion for spacecraft will be illustrated. Students will be exposed to the history and challenges of aeronautics and astronautics.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-AQR, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

AA 102: Introduction to Applied Aerodynamics

This course explores the fundamentals of the behavior of aerodynamic surfaces (airfoils, wings, bodies) immersed in a fluid across all speed regimes (from subsonic to supersonic/hypersonic). We will cover airfoil theory (subsonic and supersonic), wing theory, and introduction to viscous flows and both laminar and turbulent boundary layers, and the topic of flow transition. At the completion of this course, students will be able to understand and predict the forces and movements generated by aerodynamic configurations of interest. Assignments require a basic introductory knowledge of MATLAB or another suitable programming language. Prerequisites: CME 100 and CME 102 (or equivalent), PHYS 41, AA 100, and AA 101 or ME 70.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Alonso, J. (PI)

AA 118N: How to Design a Space Mission: from Concept to Execution

Space exploration is truly fascinating. From the space race led by governments as an outgrowth of the Cold War to the new era of space commercialization led by private companies and startups, more than 50 years have passed, characterized by great leaps forward and discoveries. We will learn how space missions are designed, from concept to execution, based on the professional experience of the lecturer and numerous examples of spacecraft, including unique hardware demonstrations by startups of the Silicon Valley. We will study the essentials of systems engineering as applicable to a variety of mission types, for communication, navigation, science, commercial, and military applications. We will explore the various elements of a space mission, including the spacecraft, ground, and launch segments with their functionalities. Special emphasis will be given to the design cycle, to understand how spacecraft are born, from the stakeholders' needs, through analysis, synthesis, all the way to their integration and validation. We will compare the current designs with those employed in the early days of the space age, and show the importance of economics in the development of spacecraft. Finally, we will brainstorm startup ideas and apply the concepts learned to a notional space mission design as a team.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-AQR, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: D'Amico, S. (PI)

AA 141: Atmospheric Flight

From people's initial dreams and theories of flight to future design problems, this class introduces students to flight in the atmosphere and the multidisciplinary challenges of aircraft design. We will discuss how new approaches to airplane propulsion, structures, autonomy, and aerodynamics can lead to environmentally sustainable future transportation, supersonic flight, and personal air vehicles. We will look at how local companies are developing autonomous aircraft, inspired by natural flyers, to systems that will provide ubiquitous internet access flying at twice the altitude of airliners.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Kroo, I. (PI)

AA 149: Operation of Aerospace Systems

This course provides a connection with the products of aerospace design through the use of tours, guest speakers, flight simulation, and hands-on exposure to systems used by pilots and space mission operators. We discuss real-world experiences with operators of spacecraft and launch vehicles, and we hear from pilots of manned and unmanned aircraft. Skills required to operate systems in the past, present, and future are addressed. Students will also develop an appreciation of the effects of human factors on aviation safety and the importance of space situational awareness. Anticipated tours include an air traffic control facility and a spacecraft operations center.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Barrows, A. (PI)

AA 190: Directed Research and Writing in Aero/Astro

For undergraduates. Experimental or theoretical work under faculty direction, and emphasizing development of research and communication skills. Written report(s) and letter grade required; if this is not appropriate, enroll in 199. Consult faculty in area of interest for appropriate topics, involving one of the graduate research groups or other special projects. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: consent of student services manager and instructor.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 3-5 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

AA 199: Independent Study in Aero/Astro

Directed reading, lab, or theoretical work for undergraduate students. Consult faculty in area of interest for appropriate topics involving one of the graduate research groups or other special projects. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-5 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

AA 212: Advanced Feedback Control Design

Analysis and design techniques for multivariable feedback systems. State-space concepts, observability, controllability, eigenvalues, eigenvectors, stability, and canonical representations. Approaches for robust feedback control design, chiefly H2, H-infinity, and mu-synthesis. System identification and adaptive control design. Use of computer-aided design with MATLAB. Prerequisite: ENGR 105, ENGR 205. Recommended: Linear algebra ( EE 263 or equivalent).
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Schwager, M. (PI)

AA 214A: Numerical Methods in Engineering and Applied Sciences (CME 207, GEOPHYS 217)

Scientific computing and numerical analysis for physical sciences and engineering. Advanced version of CME206 that, apart from CME206 material, includes nonlinear PDEs, multidimensional interpolation and integration and an extended discussion of stability for initial boundary value problems. Recommended for students who have some prior numerical analysis experience. Topics include: 1D and multi-D interpolation, numerical integration in 1D and multi-D including adaptive quadrature, numerical solutions of ordinary differential equations (ODEs) including stability, numerical solutions of 1D and multi-D linear and nonlinear partial differential equations (PDEs) including concepts of stability and accuracy. Prerequisites: linear algebra, introductory numerical analysis ( CME 108 or equivalent).
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
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