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51 - 60 of 187 results for: ARTHIST

ARTHIST 317: Picturing the Papacy, 1300-1850 (ARTHIST 117)

Popes deployed art and architecture to glorify their dual spiritual and temporal authority, being both Christ's vicars on earth and rulers of state. After the return of the papacy from Avignon, Rome underwent numerous campaigns of renovation that staged a continuity between the pontiffs and the ancient Roman emperors. Patronage of art and architecture became important tools in the fight against Protestantism. Artists include Botticelli, Michelangelo, Caravaggio, and Bernini.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 4 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ARTHIST 318: Titian, Veronese, Tintoretto (ARTHIST 118)

The course addresses the ways in which Venetian painters of the sixteenth century redefined paradigms of color, design, and invention. Themes to be examined include civic piety, new kinds of mythological painting, the intersection between naturalism and eroticism, and the relationship between art and rituals of church and statecraft.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ARTHIST 320: Living in a Material World: Seventeenth-century Dutch and Flemish Painting (ARTHIST 120)

Painting and graphic arts by artists in Flanders and Holland from 1600 to 1680, a period of political and religious strife. Historical context; their relationship to developments in the rest of Europe and contributions to the problem of representation. Preferences for particular genres such as portraits, landscapes, and scenes of everyday life; the general problem of realism as manifested in the works studied.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Marrinan, M. (PI)

ARTHIST 322: The Age of Revolution: Painting in Europe 1780-1830 (ARTHIST 122)

Survey of European painting bracketed by the French Revolution and the end of the Napoleonic conquest. Against this background of social upheavel, the visual arts were profoundly affected by shifts in patronage, public, and ideas about the social utility of image making. Lectures and readings align ruptures in the tradition of representation with the unfolding historical situation, and trace the first manifestations of a "romantic" alternative to the classicism that was the cultural legacy of pre-Revolutionary Europe.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ARTHIST 324: The Age of Naturalism, Painting in Europe1830-1874 (ARTHIST 124)

Survey of European painting from the heyday of Romanticism to the first Impressionist exhibition. Lectures and readings focus on the tensions between traditional forms and ambitions of history painting and the challenge of "modern" subjects drawn from contemporary life. Attention to the impact of painting in the open-air, and the effect of new imaging technologies- notably lithography and photography - to provide "popular" alternatives to the hand-wrought character and elitist appeal of "high art" cultural forms.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ARTHIST 332: American Art and Culture, 1528-1910 (AMSTUD 132, ARTHIST 132)

The visual arts and literature of the U.S. from the beginnings of European exploration to the Civil War. Focus is on questions of power and its relation to culture from early Spanish exploration to the rise of the middle classes. Cabeza de Vaca, Benjamin Franklin, John Singleton Copley, Phillis Wheatley, Charles Willson Peale, Emerson, Hudson River School, American Genre painters, Melville, Hawthorne and others.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ARTHIST 343A: American Architecture (ARTHIST 143A)

A historically based understanding of what defines American architecture. What makes American architecture American, beginning with indigenous structures of pre-Columbian America. Materials, structure, and form in the changing American context. How these ideas are being transformed in today's globalized world.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ARTHIST 345: Culture Wars: Art and Social Conflict in the USA, 1890-1950 (AMSTUD 145M, ARTHIST 145, FEMGEN 145)

This course examines social conflicts and political controversies in American culture through the lens of visual art and photography. We consider how visual images both reflect and participate in the social and political life of the nation and how the terms of citizenship have been represented¿and, at times, contested¿by artists throughout the first half of the 20th century. The class explores the relation between American art and the body politic by focusing on issues of poverty, war, censorship, consumerism, class identity, and racial division.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ARTHIST 347: MODERNISM AND MODERNITY (ARTHIST 147)

The development of modern art and visual culture in Europe and the US, beginning with Paris in the 1860s, the period of Haussmann, Baudelaire and Manet, and ending with the Bauhaus and Surrealism in the 1920s and 30s. Modernism in art, architecture and design (e.g., Gauguin, Picasso, Duchamp, Mondrian, Le Corbusier, Breuer, Dali) will be explored as a compelling dream of utopian possibilities involving multifaceted and often ambivalent, even contradictory responses to the changes brought about by industrialization, urbanization, and the rise of mass culture.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Troy, N. (PI)

ARTHIST 354: The American Civil War: A Visual History (AMSTUD 154X, ARTHIST 154)

A painting of men charging across a field, a photograph of dead bodies in a ditch, a fragment of metal, a sliver of bone, and a brass button: how do we make sense of the visual record of the American Civil War (1861-65)? From the Capitol Dome to a skeleton dug up in a highway project a hundred years after the last battle, the course will consider the strange and scattered remnants of a famous era. Drawing on the poetry of Walt Whitman, Emily Dickinson, and Herman Melville, the paintings of Winslow Homer, the photographs of Alexander Gardner, and the oratory of Abraham Lincoln, the course will examine what cannot be portrayed: the trauma of war.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Nemerov, A. (PI)
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