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111 - 120 of 187 results for: ARTHIST

ARTHIST 225: Cezanne

This seminar will study the complexity and richness of pictures made by Paul Cézanne that affected the course of modernist painting during the early twentieth century. Usually called an Impressionist, Cézanne shares only partially Monet's concern for fleeting effects, and he evokes little of Renoir¿s charm. He did not paint the bustle of city life like Manet or Degas. Cézanne spent most of his career near his hometown of Aix-en-Provence painting landscapes, a few local residents, and many still-lifes. Yet Matisse was serious when he said, "Cézanne, you see is a sort of god of painting. Dangerous his influence? So what? Too bad for those without the strength to survive it." The seminar will explore the foundations of that influence.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Marrinan, M. (PI)

ARTHIST 229D: Topophilia: Place in Japanese Visual Culture through 19th Century (JAPANGEN 229)

Attachments to "place" and "home" are hard-wired into the biology of humans and animals alike, although such attachments vary according to specific times, cultures, and states of mind. Can we speak of a "Japanese sense of place" and if so, what is distinctive about it? Seminar explores religious visions and ritual fields; narratives of itinerancy; cityscapes; topographic taxonomies. Knowledge of Japanese culture is beneficial but not mandatory.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ARTHIST 243C: The Art of Travel

This undergraduate seminar explores a variety of objects upon which we see the marks of makers smitten and/or stymied by new technologies of transportation ¿ objects about the steamship, the railroad, the automobile, the airplane, the space shuttle, the internet. Among many types of material culture, the course considers scrimshaw, album quilts, maps, paintings, photographs, city plans, hood ornaments, and advertisements from the early Republic to the present. How do objects mark geographic movement, and the social relationships forged in the process? What do these marks tell us about how we, as contemporary viewers, experience the world?
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Bennett, E. (PI)

ARTHIST 244: The Visual Culture of the American Home Front, 1941-1945 (AMSTUD 244)

How does home front of WWII look now? What sort of meanings appear with the vantage of more than sixty years' distance? Examining Hollywood films from those years -films made during the war but mostly not directly about the war - the seminar focuses on developing students' abilities to write emotion-based criticism and history. Weekly short papers, each one in response to a film screening, are required. Among the films screened: Shadow of a Doubt, Gaslight, I Walked with a Zombie, The Best Years of Our Lives.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ARTHIST 246A: California Dreaming: West Coast Art and Visual Culture, 1848 - present

This seminar examines art, photography, and other forms of cultural production (e.g. film, advertisements, postcards) in and about California from the middle of the 19th century to the present. It approaches California as a contested political, historical and geographical site and as a series of images and alternative "lifestyles." How have artists pictured the state's diverse landscapes, both natural and commercial, as well as its complex history of labor, immigration, ethnicity, tourism, and social division?
Terms: not given this year | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ARTHIST 246B: Pop Art (AMSTUD 246B)

A new course on the history and meaning of Pop art in the United States and abroad. The course will feature close study of paintings, photographs, and prints at the Cantor Art Center. The course will be given in the Denning Family Resource Room, located in The Anderson Collection building. If you have any questions regarding the location, please contact Linda Esquivel at lindae@stanford.edu.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Meyer, R. (PI)

ARTHIST 248B: Architecture, Urbanism, and Visual Culture in Early Modern Rome

This seminar investigates architecture in Rome, from Michelangelo to Piranesi. It examines the origins of modern urbanism; the piazza as ceremonial theater; the water network and fountain displays; palace design inside and out; religious institutions, from convents to confraternities; church design inside and out; the devotional and illusionistic space of the family chapel; festival architecture; light symbolism and geometry; the use of new materials and technologies; the relationship of early modern architecture to painting and sculpture; and the question of a unity of the arts.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ARTHIST 255: Hidden Histories: Art and Misrepresentation

What happens when art functions as a decoy, taking us away from stories that it refuses to tell? We will explore three modern artists who grapple, in unpredictable ways, with the historical events that have shaped them: Philip Guston and the Holocaust; Martin Puryear and the Civil Rights movement; and South African artist William Kentridge and apartheid. When appropriate, we will look at objects at the Cantor Art Center (Stanford) as well as museums in the Bay Area. The course will provide the foundation for an exhibition at the Cantor Arts Center and the Yale University Art Gallery in 2016.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ARTHIST 262: Office of Metropolitan Architecture: Workshop of the New (CEE 132Q)

This seminar investigates all aspects of the work of the Office of Metropolitan Architecture (OMA) and its leader Rem Koolhaas. Topics for class research and inquiry include but are not be limited to: Koolhaas's early work at the Architectural Association and the founding of OMA, the publications of OMA and their style of presentation and theoretical foundations, the importance of AMO, and the architects who have left OMA and founded their own practices and how these differ from OMA. Each student completes an in-depth research paper and an in-class presentation.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ARTHIST 269A: Art and Technology (STS 200I)

The dynamic relationship between art and technology and its formative impact on culture, politics and society. Beginning with Aristotle on the notion of techne and its implications for art and craft, the seminar will focus primarily on the modern period as well as contemporary developments. Topics: The invention of linear perspective during the Renaissance as influenced by Arab mathematics; the culture of optical devices and painting; the birth of photography and cinema and new forms of pictorial representation; the avant-garde and the ¿Machine Age¿; art and technology collaborations during the 1960s; interactivity and the rise of media arts; sound art; biotechnology and the arts. Guest speakers and possible field trips. Enrollment limited to STS Senior majors and art and art history majors.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
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