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111 - 120 of 187 results for: ARTHIST

ARTHIST 205: Cairo and Istanbul: Urban Space, Memory, Protest

In the aftermath of the Arab Spring, the city of Cairo has become a theater of social and political upheaval. In Istanbul, the Gezi protests in spring and summer 2013 drew attention to the contested public space. These events are the result of longstanding developments in the urban and social fabric. This seminar introduces students to the architectural and urban history of Istanbul and Cairo, with the current transformations as a central point of reference. Readings will focus on the tension between historical center and recent urban development, the social problems arising from the segregation, and reactions of scholars, architects, and artists to these issues.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Blessing, P. (PI)

ARTHIST 205A: Islamic Painting: Landscape, Body, Power

This seminar focuses on the production of paintings, mostly but not exclusively miniatures in books, in the Islamic world. A particular focus lies on the Muslim Empires of the sixteenth to eighteenth centuries, namely the Ottoman, Safavid, and Mughal realms, together stretching from the Balkans to India. During this period, illustrated books were popular objects of high-level patronage, and numerous examples have survived that allow a detailed study of the implications of these images. Themes discussed include: figural representation in Islam, patronage and court culture; gender and the body; illustrations of literature and history; images of Sufis ceremonies; portraiture; images of animals and nature; the impact of European prints and paintings; space and landscape. A field-trip to the Museum of Asian Art in San Francisco to view Mughal paintings from India is planned.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ARTHIST 206H: Women and the Book: Scribes, Artists, and Readers from Late Antiquity through the Fourteenth Century (FEMGEN 216, HISTORY 216, HISTORY 316)

This course examines the cultural worlds of medieval women through particular attention to the books that they owned, commissioned, and created. Beginning with the earliest Christian centuries, the course proceeds chronologically, charting women¿s book ownership, scribal and artistic activity, and patronage from Late Antiquity through the fourteenth century. In addition to examining specific manuscripts (in facsimile, or digitally), we will consider ancillary questions to do with women¿s authorship, education and literacy, reading patterns, devotional practices, and visual traditions and representation.
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ARTHIST 208: Hagia Sophia (CLASSICS 173)

By employing a methodology based in psychoacoustics, semiotics, and phenomenology, this course explores the relationship among sound, water, marble, meaning, and religious experience in the sixth-century church of HagianSophia built by emperor Justinian in Constantinople. We will read medieval sources describing the interior and ritual, make short movies exploring the shimmer of marble in buildings on campus, and study the acoustics of domed buildings through computer auralization done at Stanford's CCRMA (Center for Computer Research in Music and Acoustics)
Terms: not given this year | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ARTHIST 209: Art and Religious Experience in Byzantium and Islam (ARTHIST 309, CLASSICS 174)

This course presents a comparative study of Christian and Islamic paradigms (sixth to the thirteenth centuries) in the construction of religious experience through the material fabric of the building, the interior decor, objects, and rituals. We will read medieval ekphrastic texts and poetry, which stirred the viewer/participant to experience the building/object as animate. Among the sites we will study are: Hagia Sophia, the Ka'ba, the Dome of teh Rock, the Mosque at Damascus and at Cordoba. We will read Byzantine and Arabic writers such as Paul the Silentiary, Patriarch Germanos, Maximus Confessor, Shahrawardi, and Ibn Arabi.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ARTHIST 209C: Iconoclasm (ARTHIST 409, CLASSICS 158, CLASSICS 258, REES 409)

Iconoclasm, iconophobia, and aniconism as markers of cultural transformation of the Mediterranean in the 7th-9th centuries. The identity crisis in the region as the Arabs established the Umayyad caliphate, conquering the Holy Land, Egypt, and Spain. The West consolidated around the Carolingians versus the East split between the Byzantines and the Arabs. How each of these three empires emerged from the ashes of late antique culture and carved an identity out of a common cultural foundation. The course will take place in the seminar room of the Art and Architectural Library located in the Cummings Art Building.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ARTHIST 225: Cezanne

This seminar will study the complexity and richness of pictures made by Paul Cézanne that affected the course of modernist painting during the early twentieth century. Usually called an Impressionist, Cézanne shares only partially Monet's concern for fleeting effects, and he evokes little of Renoir¿s charm. He did not paint the bustle of city life like Manet or Degas. Cézanne spent most of his career near his hometown of Aix-en-Provence painting landscapes, a few local residents, and many still-lifes. Yet Matisse was serious when he said, "Cézanne, you see is a sort of god of painting. Dangerous his influence? So what? Too bad for those without the strength to survive it." The seminar will explore the foundations of that influence.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Marrinan, M. (PI)

ARTHIST 229D: Topophilia: Place in Japanese Visual Culture through 19th Century (JAPANGEN 229)

Attachments to "place" and "home" are hard-wired into the biology of humans and animals alike, although such attachments vary according to specific times, cultures, and states of mind. Can we speak of a "Japanese sense of place" and if so, what is distinctive about it? Seminar explores religious visions and ritual fields; narratives of itinerancy; cityscapes; topographic taxonomies. Knowledge of Japanese culture is beneficial but not mandatory.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ARTHIST 244: The Visual Culture of the American Home Front, 1941-1945 (AMSTUD 244)

How does home front of WWII look now? What sort of meanings appear with the vantage of more than sixty years' distance? Examining Hollywood films from those years -films made during the war but mostly not directly about the war - the seminar focuses on developing students' abilities to write emotion-based criticism and history. Weekly short papers, each one in response to a film screening, are required. Among the films screened: Shadow of a Doubt, Gaslight, I Walked with a Zombie, The Best Years of Our Lives.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ARTHIST 246A: California Dreaming: West Coast Art and Visual Culture, 1848 - present

This seminar examines art, photography, and other forms of cultural production (e.g. film, advertisements, postcards) in and about California from the middle of the 19th century to the present. It approaches California as a contested political, historical and geographical site and as a series of images and alternative "lifestyles." How have artists pictured the state's diverse landscapes, both natural and commercial, as well as its complex history of labor, immigration, ethnicity, tourism, and social division?
Terms: not given this year | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
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