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1 - 10 of 40 results for: CME ; Currently searching autumn courses. You can expand your search to include all quarters

CME 20Q: Computational Modeling for Future Leaders

Preference to sophomores. How can we harness and exploit the power of computational modeling? What responsibilities are there in developing and using computer models? In this course we will analyze fundamental issues inherent to computational modeling such as uncertainty, predictability, error, and resolution. We will furthermore examine the social context of computational modeling including the public perception of computational models, how computer modeling impacts politics and policy, and how politics and policy, in turn, influence computer modeling.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Minion, M. (PI)

CME 100: Vector Calculus for Engineers (ENGR 154)

Computation and visualization using MATLAB. Differential vector calculus: analytic geometry in space, functions of several variables, partial derivatives, gradient, unconstrained maxima and minima, Lagrange multipliers. Introduction to linear algebra: matrix operations, systems of algebraic equations, methods of solution and applications. Integral vector calculus: multiple integrals in Cartesian, cylindrical, and spherical coordinates, line integrals, scalar potential, surface integrals, Green¿s, divergence, and Stokes¿ theorems. Examples and applications drawn from various engineering fields. Prerequisites: 10 units of AP credit (Calc BC with 4 or 5, or Calc AB with 5), or Math 41 and 42. Note: Students enrolled in section 100-02 and 100A-02 are required to attend the discussion section (section 03) on Thursdays 4:30-5:50pm.
Terms: Aut, Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Math, WAY-FR | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

CME 100A: Vector Calculus for Engineers, ACE

Students attend CME100/ENGR154 lectures with additional recitation sessions; two to four hours per week, emphasizing engineering mathematical applications and collaboration methods. Enrollment by department permission only. Prerequisite: application at: http://soe.stanford.edu/current_students/edp/programs/ace.html
Terms: Aut, Win | Units: 6 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Math, WAY-FR | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

CME 102: Ordinary Differential Equations for Engineers (ENGR 155A)

Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Math, WAY-FR | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

CME 102A: Ordinary Differential Equations for Engineers, ACE

Students attend CME102/ENGR155A lectures with additional recitation sessions; two to four hours per week, emphasizing engineering mathematical applications and collaboration methods. Prerequisite: students must be enrolled in the regular section ( CME102) prior to submitting application at: http://soe.stanford.edu/current_students/edp/programs/ace.html
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 6 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Math, WAY-FR | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

CME 103: Introduction to Matrix Methods (EE 103)

Introduction to applied linear algebra with emphasis on applications. Vectors, norm, and angle; linear independence and orthonormal sets. Matrices, left and right inverses, QR factorization. Least- squares and model fitting, regularization and cross-validation, time-series prediction, and other examples. Constrained least-squares; applications to least-norm reconstruction, optimal control, and portfolio optimization. Newton methods and nonlinear least-squares. Prerequisites: MATH 51 or CME 100.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Math, WAY-FR | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Boyd, S. (PI)

CME 151: Introduction to Data Visualization

Bring your data to life with beautiful and interactive visualizations. This course is designed to provide practical experience on combining data science and graphic design to effectively communicate knowledge buried inside complex data. Each lecture will explore a different set of free industry-standard tools, for example d3.js, three.js, ggplots2, and processing; enabling students to think critically about how to architect their own interactive visualization for data exploration, web, presentations, and publications. Geared towards scientists and engineers, and with a particular emphasis on web, this course assumes an advanced background in programming methodology in multiple languages (particularly R and Javascript). Assignments are short and focus on visual experimentation with interesting data sets or the students' own data. Topics: data, visualization, web. Prerequisites: some experience with general programming is required to understand the lectures and assignments.
Terms: Aut, Win | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: Deriso, D. (PI)

CME 192: Introduction to MATLAB

This short course runs for the first eight weeks of the quarter and is offered each quarter during the academic year. It is highly recommended for students with no prior programming experience who are expected to use MATLAB in math, science, or engineering courses. It will consist of interactive lectures and application-based assignments.nThe goal of the short course is to make students fluent in MATLAB and to provide familiarity with its wide array of features. The course covers an introduction of basic programming concepts, data structures, and control/flow; and an introduction to scientific computing in MATLAB, scripts, functions, visualization, simulation, efficient algorithm implementation, toolboxes, and more.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: Yu, J. (PI)

CME 193: Introduction to Scientific Python

This short course runs for the first four weeks of the quarter. It is recommended for students who are familiar with programming at least at the level of CS106A and want to translate their programming knowledge to Python with the goal of becoming proficient in the scientific computing and data science stack. Lectures will be interactive with a focus on real world applications of scientific computing. Technologies covered include Numpy, SciPy, Pandas, Scikit-learn, and others. Topics will be chosen from Linear Algebra, Optimization, Machine Learning, and Data Science. Prior knowledge of programming will be assumed, and some familiarity with Python is helpful, but not mandatory.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

CME 195: Introduction to R (STATS 195)

This short course runs for the first four weeks of the quarter and is offered in fall and spring. It is recommended for students who want to use R in statistics, science, or engineering courses and for students who want to learn the basics of R programming. The goal of the short course is to familiarize students with R's tools for scientific computing. Lectures will be interactive with a focus on learning by example, and assignments will be application-driven. No prior programming experience is needed. Topics covered include basic data structures, File I/O, graphs, control structures, etc, and some useful packages in R.
Terms: Aut, Spr | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
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