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1 - 5 of 5 results for: NATIVEAM ; Currently searching winter courses. You can expand your search to include all quarters

NATIVEAM 108S: American Indian Religious Freedom (CSRE 108S)

The persistence of tribal spiritual beliefs and practices in light of legal challenges (sacred geography and the 1st Amendment), treatment of the dead and sacred objects (repatriation), consumerism (New Age commodification), and cultural intellectual property protection (trademark, copyright, patent law). Focus is on contemporary issues and cases, analyzed through interdisciplinary scholarship and practical strategies to protect the fundamental liberty of American Indian religious freedom.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Biestman, K. (PI)

NATIVEAM 122: Historiography & Native American Oral Traditions and Narratives

The writing of history, in particular the writing of history based on the critical examination of sources, scholars often ignore those from a Native American perspective. In the selection of what constitutes Native American history whether it is a Native American leader or hero¿s views, or the inclusion of specific details of events from a Native American perspective, the synthesis of these particulars into a narrative is often from a non-Native American perspective. Yet, aspects of Native American oral tradition continue to tell specific tribal histories that have survived and continue to withstand the test of time. Should these oral tradition narratives be included in the telling of Native American history?n nFor Native American peoples concepts of time differ from culture to culture where history may be defined differently from one group to another. Among these different groups time is organized in different ways, i.e. for the Lakota speaking peoples, Wintercounts are kept to record more »
The writing of history, in particular the writing of history based on the critical examination of sources, scholars often ignore those from a Native American perspective. In the selection of what constitutes Native American history whether it is a Native American leader or hero¿s views, or the inclusion of specific details of events from a Native American perspective, the synthesis of these particulars into a narrative is often from a non-Native American perspective. Yet, aspects of Native American oral tradition continue to tell specific tribal histories that have survived and continue to withstand the test of time. Should these oral tradition narratives be included in the telling of Native American history?n nFor Native American peoples concepts of time differ from culture to culture where history may be defined differently from one group to another. Among these different groups time is organized in different ways, i.e. for the Lakota speaking peoples, Wintercounts are kept to record significant events in Lakota history for each year counted as a winter (thirteen months); however time is accounted for, each nation appears to incorporate oral tradition narratives that provide a cultural perspective of a group¿s origins. nFrom a Western perspective, history is secular and objectively evaluative whereas for most Indigenous peoples, history is a moral endeavor (Walker, Lakota Society 113). Thus for the Lakota peoples: ¿History is never simply the past, but the past as it relates to the present. This past is preceded, accompanied, and followed by an ever present, sacred dimension which [is] outside the realm of human time¿Without it, mere human history would lack the larger relevance that is essential to the Lakota concept. For [the Lakota], history is sacred history¿ (Walker, Lakota Society 113). nnThis course will examine the principles and theories used in the writing of Native American history in order to determine what constitutes how history is told in today's narratives. A text edited by Hurtado and Iverson that encourages critical thinking about major problems in American Indian history introduces students to primary sources and analytical essays on important topics in U.S. history with regard to Native Americans. Other selected readings on historiography and Native American oral tradition narratives will be utilized. Through the assigned readings students can read and evaluate primary sources, analyze and interpret essays by well-known Native American historians and others; and are encouraged in class discussions to draw their own conclusions in how Native American history should be told. Students will write two shorter papers and one longer paper on the topics relevant to the title of this course.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

NATIVEAM 200R: Directed Research

Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-5 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

NATIVEAM 200W: Directed Reading

Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-5 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

NATIVEAM 221: Peacemaking Circles: Crafting Challenging Conversations in a Conflicted World (CSRE 221D)

Explore indigenous cultural methods of navigating and resolving conflict while developing and designing new tools to promote peace across Native America. Peacemaking is a form of conflict resolution that has been traditionally used by indigenous communities and continues to have a strong presence in many tribal judicial systems today. Throughout this interactive, skills-based course students will practice and design for the art of Peacemaking and conflict-resolution. Students can expect to unpack the components of strong listening, leadership, and effective cultural competency-- abilities that are crucial in any conflict situation. By exposing students to Peacemaking, the psychology behind decision making, and design thinking, we challenge students to rethink the structures currently in place to handle conflict. nnThe only background skills necessary for this course are a dedication to participate and interact with the class and a willingness to embrace diverse perspectives.nnCourse meets 9:30am-5:00pm in d.School room 160 on the following dates:nJan 11-12nJan 25-26nFeb 9nMar 8-9
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
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