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91 - 100 of 230 results for: CARDCOURSES::* ; Currently searching offered courses. You can also include unoffered courses

EDUC 239: Educating Young STEM Thinkers (EDUC 139, ME 139, ME 231)

The course introduces students to the design thinking process, the national conversations about the future of STEM careers, and opportunities to work with middle school students and K-12 teachers in STEM-based after-school activities and intercession camps. The course is both theory and practice focused. The purpose is twofold; to provide reflection and mentoring opportunities for students to learn about pathways to STEM careers and to introduce mentoring opportunities with young STEM thinkers.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Goldman, S. (PI)

EDUC 245: Understanding Racial and Ethnic Identity Development (AFRICAAM 245, CSRE 245)

This seminar will explore the impact and relative salience of racial/ethnic identity on select issues including: discrimination, social justice, mental health and academic performance. Theoretical perspectives on identity development will be reviewed, along with research on other social identity variables, such as social class, gender and regional identifications. New areas within this field such as the complexity of multiracial identity status and intersectional invisibility will also be discussed. Though the class will be rooted in psychology and psychological models of identity formation, no prior exposure to psychology is assumed and other disciplines-including cultural studies, feminist studies, and literature-will be incorporated into the course materials.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

EDUC 281: Technology for Learners

How can we use technology to improve learning? Many hope that technology will make learning easier, faster, or accessible to more learners. This course explores a variety of approaches to designing tools for learning, the theories behind them, and the research that tests their effectiveness. Strong focus on evaluating and designing new tools for specific learners and subjects. Space is limited. Priority is given to master's students in the LDT Master's Program. Cardinal Course certified by the Haas Center.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

EDUC 322: Community-based Research As Tool for Social Change:Discourses of Equity in Communities & Classrooms (AFRICAAM 130, CSRE 130, EDUC 123)

Issues and strategies for studying oral and written discourse as a means for understanding classrooms, students, and teachers, and teaching and learning in educational contexts. The forms and functions of oral and written language in the classroom, emphasizing teacher-student and peer interaction, and student-produced texts. Individual projects utilize discourse analytic techniques.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Ball, A. (PI)

EDUC 332: Theory and Practice of Environmental Education (EARTHSYS 332)

Foundational understanding of the history, theoretical underpinnings, and practice of environmental education as a tool for addressing today's pressing environmental issues. The purpose, design, and implementation of environmental education in formal and nonformal settings with youth and adult audiences. Field trip and community-based project offer opportunities for experiencing and engaging with environmental education initiatives.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

EDUC 335: Designing Research-Based Interventions to Solve Global Health Problems (AFRICAST 135, AFRICAST 235, EDUC 135, HRP 235, HUMBIO 26, MED 235)

The excitement around social innovation and entrepreneurship has spawned numerous startups focused on tackling world problems, particularly in the fields of education and health. The best social ventures are launched with careful consideration paid to research, design, and efficacy. This course offers students insights into understanding how to effectively develop, evaluate, and scale social ventures. Using TeachAIDS (an award-winning nonprofit educational technology social venture used in 78 countries) as a primary case study, students will be given an in-depth look into how the entity was founded and scaled globally. Guest speakers will include world-class experts and entrepreneurs in Philanthropy, Medicine, Communications, Education, and Technology. Open to both undergraduate and graduate students.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

EDUC 337: Race, Ethnicity, and Linguistic Diversity in Classrooms: Sociocultural Theory and Practices (AFRICAAM 106, CSRE 103B, EDUC 103B)

Focus is on classrooms with students from diverse racial, ethnic and linguistic backgrounds. Studies, writing, and media representation of urban and diverse school settings; implications for transforming teaching and learning. Issues related to developing teachers with attitudes, dispositions, and skills necessary to teach diverse students.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

EDUC 377C: Philanthropy: Strategy, Innovation and Social Change

Appropriate for any student driven to effect positive social change from either the for-profit or nonprofit sector, Philanthropy will challenge students to expand their own strategic thinking about philanthropic aspiration and action. In recent decades, philanthropy has become an industry in itself - amounting to over $358 billion in the year 2014. Additionally, the last decade has seen unprecedented innovation in both philanthropy and social value creation. This course explores the key operational and strategic distinctions between traditional philanthropic entities, such as community foundations, private foundations and corporate foundations; and innovative models, including funding intermediaries, open-source platforms, technology-driven philanthropies, impact investing and venture philanthropy. Course work will include readings and case discussions that encourage students to analyze both domestic and global philanthropic strategies as they relate to foundation mission, grantmaking, more »
Appropriate for any student driven to effect positive social change from either the for-profit or nonprofit sector, Philanthropy will challenge students to expand their own strategic thinking about philanthropic aspiration and action. In recent decades, philanthropy has become an industry in itself - amounting to over $358 billion in the year 2014. Additionally, the last decade has seen unprecedented innovation in both philanthropy and social value creation. This course explores the key operational and strategic distinctions between traditional philanthropic entities, such as community foundations, private foundations and corporate foundations; and innovative models, including funding intermediaries, open-source platforms, technology-driven philanthropies, impact investing and venture philanthropy. Course work will include readings and case discussions that encourage students to analyze both domestic and global philanthropic strategies as they relate to foundation mission, grantmaking, evaluation, financial management, infrastructure, knowledge management, policy change and board governance. Guest speakers will consist of high profile philanthropists, foundation presidents, social entrepreneurs and Silicon Valley business leaders creating new philanthropic models. The course will also provide students with real-world grantmaking experience in completing nonprofit organizational assessments and making grants to organizations totaling $20,000.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

EDUC 450C: Qualitative Interviewing

Addressing the theoretical underpinnings of qualitative interviews as well as the application of theory to practice, this course considers different approaches to interviewing. Interview types covered will range from group interviews to individual interviews, and from unstructured, ethnographically oriented interviews to highly structured interviews. Working with community partners to facilitate application to practice, the students will move from theory to interview design, implementation, and initial stages of analysis, with an emphasis on consistency in approach and utility in graduate-level research.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Ardoin, N. (PI)

EDUC 470: Practicum

For advanced graduate students. (all areas)
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-15 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Alvarado, A. (PI) ; Antonio, A. (PI) ; Ardoin, N. (PI) ; Atkin, J. (PI) ; Aukerman, M. (PI) ; Ball, A. (PI) ; Barron, B. (PI) ; Bettinger, E. (PI) ; Blikstein, P. (PI) ; Booker, A. (PI) ; Bridges, E. (PI) ; Brown, B. (PI) ; Brown, N. (PI) ; Bryk, T. (PI) ; Calfee, R. (PI) ; Callan, E. (PI) ; Carnoy, M. (PI) ; Cuban, L. (PI) ; Damon, W. (PI) ; Darling-Hammond, L. (PI) ; Davis, S. (PI) ; Eisner, E. (PI) ; Fogg, B. (PI) ; Gage, N. (PI) ; Goldman, S. (PI) ; Gordon, L. (PI) ; Greeno, J. (PI) ; Grossman, P. (PI) ; Gumport, P. (PI) ; Haertel, E. (PI) ; Hakuta, K. (PI) ; Hanushek, E. (PI) ; Heath, S. (PI) ; Juel, C. (PI) ; Kamil, M. (PI) ; Kennedy, D. (PI) ; Kirst, M. (PI) ; Krumboltz, J. (PI) ; LaFromboise, T. (PI) ; Labaree, D. (PI) ; Levin, H. (PI) ; Lit, I. (PI) ; Loeb, S. (PI) ; Lotan, R. (PI) ; Lythcott, J. (PI) ; March, J. (PI) ; Martinez, A. (PI) ; Massy, W. (PI) ; McDermott, R. (PI) ; McFarland, D. (PI) ; McLaughlin, M. (PI) ; Mendoza-Newman, M. (PI) ; Meyerson, D. (PI) ; Murata, A. (PI) ; Nasir, N. (PI) ; Noddings, N. (PI) ; Olkin, I. (PI) ; Padilla, A. (PI) ; Pea, R. (PI) ; Perez-Granados, D. (PI) ; Phillips, D. (PI) ; Pope, D. (PI) ; Porteus, A. (PI) ; Post, L. (PI) ; Powell, W. (PI) ; Ramirez, F. (PI) ; Reich, R. (PI) ; Rickford, J. (PI) ; Rogosa, D. (PI) ; Rohlen, T. (PI) ; Schwartz, D. (PI) ; Shavelson, R. (PI) ; Shulman, L. (PI) ; Simms, W. (PI) ; Spindler, G. (PI) ; Staklis, S. (PI) ; Stipek, D. (PI) ; Stout, F. (PI) ; Strober, M. (PI) ; Suarez, D. (PI) ; Thoresen, C. (PI) ; Tyack, D. (PI) ; Valdes, G. (PI) ; Walker, D. (PI) ; Weiler, H. (PI) ; Williamson, J. (PI) ; Willinsky, J. (PI) ; Wineburg, S. (PI) ; Wotipka, C. (PI) ; reardon, s. (PI)
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