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1 - 10 of 16 results for: SLAVIC ; Currently searching autumn courses. You can expand your search to include all quarters

SLAVIC 77Q: Russia's Weird Classic: Nikolai Gogol

Preference to sophomores. An investigation of the works and life of Nikolai Gogol, the most eccentric of Russian authors and the founder of what is dubbed Fantastic Realism. Our investigation will be based on close reading of works written in various genres and created in various stages of Gogol's literary career. Taught in English.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

SLAVIC 120: Hacking Russia: Technological Dreams and Nightmares of Russian Culture (SLAVIC 220)

At a time being termed the Second Cold War, it is of key importance to examine Russian cultural and political phenomena and their international repercussions. In particular, this course will explore the role of technology in constructing the social and ideological fabric, as well as the material reality, of Soviet and Russian society. From the early Soviet period, when technological progress was linked to humanistic utopia, through dystopian critiques of a totalitarian machine of conformity and constraint, we proceed along the assembly line of communist production, avant-garde and constructivist artistic utopia, socialist realism, the space race, and information technology, using examples from Russian literature, film, art, visual arts, performance, and current events. With the media's concern for fake news and Russian hacking today, it is our course's goal to "hack Russia": to understand the politics and technology shaping Russia, and the creative responses that have made its society a site of both dreamlike promise and nightmarish threat, through its history and today. n NOTE: This course must be taken for a Letter Grade to be eligible for WAYS credit. "Counts towards Europe and Russia specialization (International Relations)"
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Skakov, N. (PI)

SLAVIC 129: Russian Versification: History and Theory (SLAVIC 329)

A survey of metric forms, rhyming principles and stanzaic patterns in the Russian poetry of the 18th - 21st centuries. Taught in Russian. Prerequisite: Two years of Russian. NOTE: To be eligible for WAYS credit, you must take SLAVIC 129 for a minimum of 3 Units and a Letter Grade.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

SLAVIC 145: Survey of Russian Literature: The Age of Experiment (SLAVIC 345)

This course discusses the transition from predominantly poetic to predominantly prosaic creativity in the Russian literature of the first half of the 19th century Russian literature and the birth of the great Russian novel. It covers three major Russian writers “-- Alexander Pushkin, Mikhail Lermontov and Nikolai Gogol -- and examines the changes in the Russian literary scene affected by their work. An emphasis is placed on close reading of literary texts and analysis of literary techniques employed in them. Taught in English. NOTE: To be eligible for WAYS credit, you must take SLAVIC 145 for a minimum of 3 Units and a Letter Grade.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

SLAVIC 156: Vladimir Nabokov: Displacement and the Liberated Eye (COMPLIT 115, COMPLIT 315, SLAVIC 356)

How did the triumphant author of "the great American novel" Lolita evolve from the young author writing at white heat for the tiny sad Russian emigration in Berlin? We will read his short stories and the novels The Luzhin Defense, Invitation to a Beheading, Lolita, Lolita the film, and Pale Fire, to see how Nabokov generated his sinister-playful forms as a buoyant answer to the "hypermodern" visual and film culture of pre-WWII Berlin, and then to America's all-pervading postwar "normalcy" in his pathological comic masterpieces Lolita and Pale Fire. Buy texts in translation at the Bookstore; Slavic grad students will supplement with reading and extra sessions in original Russian.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

SLAVIC 199: Individual Work for Undergraduates

Open to Russian majors or students working on special projects. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-5 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

SLAVIC 220: Hacking Russia: Technological Dreams and Nightmares of Russian Culture (SLAVIC 120)

At a time being termed the Second Cold War, it is of key importance to examine Russian cultural and political phenomena and their international repercussions. In particular, this course will explore the role of technology in constructing the social and ideological fabric, as well as the material reality, of Soviet and Russian society. From the early Soviet period, when technological progress was linked to humanistic utopia, through dystopian critiques of a totalitarian machine of conformity and constraint, we proceed along the assembly line of communist production, avant-garde and constructivist artistic utopia, socialist realism, the space race, and information technology, using examples from Russian literature, film, art, visual arts, performance, and current events. With the media's concern for fake news and Russian hacking today, it is our course's goal to "hack Russia": to understand the politics and technology shaping Russia, and the creative responses that have made its society a site of both dreamlike promise and nightmarish threat, through its history and today. n NOTE: This course must be taken for a Letter Grade to be eligible for WAYS credit. "Counts towards Europe and Russia specialization (International Relations)"
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

SLAVIC 231: Tarkovsky

The relatively slim body of work produced by the great Russian director Andrei Tarkovsky helped redefine the possibilities of the art of cinema. Older and younger generations of directors continue to be inspired by his trademark long shot, unconventional narrative techniques, everence for landscape and nature, and by general spatio-temporal discontinuity. The course provides a systematic examination of the director's complete oeuvre (seven feature films and his works for radio and opera) along with his main theoretical treatise Sculpting in Time.NOTE: To be eligible for WAYS credit, you must take SLAVIC 231 for a minimum of 3 Units and a Letter Grade.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Skakov, N. (PI)

SLAVIC 261: Reading Leo Tolstoy in the Digital Age (SLAVIC 361)

The novelist and philosopher Leo Tolstoy pioneered ideas of multi-perspectivism, relativism, "contagious" art, and literary montage. How can we analyze the link between his prose fiction and modernist art by means of digital humanities methods? This course is arranged as a series of digital labs and seminar discussions and utilizes a project-based learning approach, with individual and collaborative projects. We create character networks in Gephi, side-by-side visualization of different versions of Tolstoy's texts in Beyond Compare, and text mining in RStudio. Taught in English. Note: To be eligible for WAYS credit, you must take SLAVIC 261 for a minimum of 3 Units and a Letter Grade.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

SLAVIC 300B: Research Tools and Professionalization Workshop

This course introduces graduate students in Slavic Studies to library, archival, and web resources for research, grant opportunities, publication strategies, and professional timelines. Open to PhD students in the Slavic Department and other departments and to MA students in CREEES. NOTE: Those wishing to enroll, please contact Prof. Safran to obtain the course's meeting time and location.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Safran, G. (PI)
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