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61 - 70 of 114 results for: all courses

FEMST 153: Women and the Creative Imagination (FEMST 253)

Examines the nature of artistic imagination, considering the relationship among muses, mentors and models for women engaged painting, music, theatre, film, creative writing, dance, etc We will study how gender relations and sexual identity have affected women¿s art across various cultures, lands and times. We will critically examine gender roles in music, visual art and literature. Active student participation (in writing, discussion as well as in attendance at performances, exhibits and readings) is the heart of the class.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Autumn 2012 | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-Gender | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

FEMST 164: Performance and Gender (FEMST 364, TAPS 164H, TAPS 364H)

The intersectionality of race, sex, gender, and class in the formation of gendered performance. Readings from the work of Judith Butler, Eve Sedgwick, David Savran, Judith Halberstam, and David Eng. Case studies include: M. Butterfly, The Crying Game, Paris is Burning, Angels in America, and American Idol..
Terms: not given this year, last offered Spring 2012 | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-Gender | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

FEMST 166: Feminist Theories of Knowledge (PHIL 184F, PHIL 284F)

Feminist critique of traditional approaches in epistemology and alternative feminist approaches to such topics as reason and rationality, objectivity, experience, truth, the knowing subject, knowledge and values, knowledge and power.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Spring 2007 | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-Gender | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

FEMST 173: Gender and Higher Education: National and International Perspectives (EDUC 173, EDUC 273, SOC 173, SOC 273)

This course examines the ways in which higher education structures and policies affect females, males, and students in relation to each other and how changes in those structures and policies improve experiences for females and males similarly or differently. Students are expected to gain an understanding of theories and perspectives from the social sciences relevant to an understanding of the role of higher education in relation to structures of gender differentiation and hierarchy. Topics include undergraduate and graduate education; identity and sexuality; gender and science; gender and faculty; and the development of feminist scholarship and pedagogy. Attention is paid to how these issues are experienced by women and men in the United States, including people of color, and by academics throughout the world, and how these have changed over time.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Spring 2013 | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:EC-Gender, WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

FILMSTUD 136: Gender and Sexuality in Chinese Cinema (FILMSTUD 336)

Representations of gender and sexuality in the cinemas of China, Taiwan, and Hong Kong, covering key periods and genres such as the golden age of Shanghai film, Hong Kong action pictures, opera films, post-socialist art films, and new queer cinema. Historical and contemporary perspectives on cinematic constructions of femininity, masculinity, and sexuality as they relate to issues of nationalism, modernity, globalization, and feminist and queer politics. Weekly screening required.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Spring 2012 | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:EC-Gender | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

FRENCH 205: Songs of Love and War: Gender, Crusade, Politics (FEMGEN 205)

Analysis of medieval love, satirical and Crusade lyrics of the trouabdours. Study of deictic address, corporeal subjectivity, the female voice, love debates, and the body as a figure of political conflict. Course readings include medieval treatises on lyric and modern translations of the troubadour tradition. Works by Ovid, Bernart de Ventadorn, Bertran de Born, La Comtessa de Dia, Thibaut de Champagne, Raimon Vidal, Dante, and Pound. Taught in English. Course includes a lab component for creation of multi-media translation projects: trobar. stanford.edu.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:EC-Gender, WAY-A-II, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Galvez, M. (PI)

GSBGEN 112Q: Leading Out Loud: an Exploration of Leadership Communication through an LGBT Lens

Students of all sexual orientations are invited to apply for this unique new seminar looking at the distinct challenge LGBT leaders have faced in communicating effectively. Through the years, many individuals have led the struggle for gay rights and inclusion through a variety of different communication strategies and tactics; some were successful while others were not. This seminar course will explore some of the key leaders in the LGBT community and how they chose to communicate. Together we will search through a variety of film clips, transcripts, news reports, and other historical elements to see how the message, media, and moments work together. A number of guest speakers will also share their perspective on what it means to "Lead Out Loud." Heterosexual identified students as well as LGBT students are encouraged to apply; in fact, we seek to have a true diversity of opinions in the room as we explore this topic. All students will benefit from this exploration of how to communicate about controversial, sensitive, and personal subjects with greater strength and purpose.
Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:EC-Gender | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

HISTORY 36N: Gay Autobiography (FEMGEN 36N)

Preference to freshmen. Gender, identity, and solidarity as represented in nine autobiographies: Isherwood, Ackerley, Duberman, Monette, Louganis, Barbin, Cammermeyer, Gingrich, and Lorde. To what degree do these writers view sexual orientation as a defining feature of their selves? Is there a difference between the way men and women view identity? What politics follow from these writers' experiences?
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-Gender, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Robinson, P. (PI)

HISTORY 44: Women and Gender in Science, Medicine and Engineering

(Same as HISTORY 144. Majors and others taking 5 units, enroll in HISTORY 144.) Men's and women's roles in science, medicine, and engineering over the past 200 years with a focus on the present. What efforts are underway globally to transform research institutions so that both men's and women's careers can flourish? How have science and medicine studied and defined males and females? How can we harness the creative power of gender analysis to enhance knowledge and spark innovation?
Terms: Win, last offered Winter 2017 | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-Gender, WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

HISTORY 54N: African American Women's Lives (AFRICAAM 54N, AMSTUD 54N, CSRE 54N, FEMGEN 54N)

This course encourages students to think critically about historical sources and to use creative and rigorous historical methods to recover African American women¿s experiences, which often have been placed on the periphery of American history and American life.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-Gender, WAY-A-II, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Hobbs, A. (PI)
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