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51 - 60 of 89 results for: CS

CS 246H: Mining Massive Data Sets Hadoop Lab

Supplement to CS 246 providing additional material on Hadoop. Students will learn how to implement data mining algorithms using Hadoop, how to implement and debug complex MapReduce jobs in Hadoop, and how to use some of the tools in the Hadoop ecosystem for data mining and machine learning. Topics: Hadoop, MapReduce, HDFS, combiners, secondary sort, distributed cache, SQL on Hadoop, Hive, Cloudera ML/Oryx, Mahout, Hadoop streaming, implementing Hadoop jobs, debugging Hadoop jobs, TF-IDF, Pig, Sqoop, Oozie, HBase, Impala. Prerequisite: CS 107 or equivalent.
Terms: Win | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

CS 247: Human-Computer Interaction Design Studio

Project-based focus on interaction design process, especially early-stage design and rapid prototyping. Methods used in interaction design including needs analysis, user observation, sketching, concept generation, scenario building, and evaluation. Prerequisites: 147 or equivalent background in design thinking; 106B or equivalent background in programming. Recommended: CS 142 or equivalent background in web programming.
Terms: Win, Spr | Units: 3-4 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

CS 248: Interactive Computer Graphics

This is the second course in the computer graphics sequence, and as such it assumes a strong familiarity with rendering and image creation. The course has a strong focus on computational geometry, animation, and simulation. Topics include splines, implicit surfaces, geometric modeling, collision detection, animation curves, particle systems and crowds, character animation, articulation, skinning, motion capture and editing, rigid and deformable bodies, and fluid simulation. As a final project, students implement an interactive video game utilizing various concepts covered in the class. Games may be designed on mobile devices, in a client/server/browser environment, or on a standard personal computer. Prerequisite: CS148.
Terms: Win, Spr | Units: 3-4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

CS 250: Algebraic Error Correcting Codes (EE 387)

Introduction to the theory of error correcting codes, emphasizing algebraic constructions, and diverse applications throughout computer science and engineering. Topics include basic bounds on error correcting codes; Reed-Solomon and Reed-Muller codes; list-decoding, list-recovery and locality. Applications may include communication, storage, complexity theory, pseudorandomness, cryptography, streaming algorithms, group testing, and compressed sensing. Prerequisites: Linear algebra, basic probability (at the level of, say, CS109, CME106 or EE178) and "mathematical maturity" (students will be asked to write proofs). Familiarity with finite fields will be helpful but not required.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

CS 255: Introduction to Cryptography

For advanced undergraduates and graduate students. Theory and practice of cryptographic techniques used in computer security. Topics: encryption (symmetric and public key), digital signatures, data integrity, authentication, key management, PKI, zero-knowledge protocols, and real-world applications. Prerequisite: basic probability theory.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

CS 257: Logic and Artificial Intelligence (PHIL 356C)

This is a course at the intersection of philosophical logic and artificial intelligence. After reviewing recent work in AI that has leveraged ideas from logic, we will slow down and study in more detail various components of high-level intelligence and the tools that have been designed to capture those components. Specific areas will include: reasoning about belief and action, causality and counterfactuals, legal and normative reasoning, natural language inference, and Turing-complete logical formalisms including (probabilistic) logic programming and lambda calculus. Our main concern will be understanding the logical tools themselves, including their formal properties and how they relate to other tools such as probability and statistics. At the end, students should expect to have learned a lot more about logic, and also to have a sense for how logic has been and can be used in AI applications. Prerequisites: A background in logic, at least at the level of Phil 151, will be expected. I more »
This is a course at the intersection of philosophical logic and artificial intelligence. After reviewing recent work in AI that has leveraged ideas from logic, we will slow down and study in more detail various components of high-level intelligence and the tools that have been designed to capture those components. Specific areas will include: reasoning about belief and action, causality and counterfactuals, legal and normative reasoning, natural language inference, and Turing-complete logical formalisms including (probabilistic) logic programming and lambda calculus. Our main concern will be understanding the logical tools themselves, including their formal properties and how they relate to other tools such as probability and statistics. At the end, students should expect to have learned a lot more about logic, and also to have a sense for how logic has been and can be used in AI applications. Prerequisites: A background in logic, at least at the level of Phil 151, will be expected. In case a student is willing to put in the extra work to catch up, it may be possible to take the course with background equivalent to Phil 150 or CS 157. A background in AI, at the level of CS 221, would also be very helpful and will at times be expected. 2 unit option only for PhD students past the second year. Course website: http://web.stanford.edu/class/cs257/
Terms: Win | Units: 2-4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

CS 261: Optimization and Algorithmic Paradigms

Algorithms for network optimization: max-flow, min-cost flow, matching, assignment, and min-cut problems. Introduction to linear programming. Use of LP duality for design and analysis of algorithms. Approximation algorithms for NP-complete problems such as Steiner Trees, Traveling Salesman, and scheduling problems. Randomized algorithms. Introduction to online algorithms. Prerequisite: 161 or equivalent.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

CS 270: Modeling Biomedical Systems: Ontology, Terminology, Problem Solving (BIOMEDIN 210)

Methods for modeling biomedical systems and for building model-based software systems. Emphasis is on intelligent systems for decision support and Semantic Web applications. Topics: knowledge representation, controlled terminologies, ontologies, reusable problem solvers, and knowledge acquisition. Students learn about current trends in the development of advanced biomedical software systems and acquire hands-on experience with several systems and tools. Prerequisites: CS106A, basic familiarity with biology.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

CS 273A: The Human Genome Source Code (BIOMEDIN 273A, DBIO 273A)

A computational introduction to the most amazing programming language on the planet: your genome. Topics include genome sequencing (assembling source code from code fragments); the human genome functional landscape: variable assignments (genes), control-flow logic (gene regulation) and run-time stack (epigenomics); human disease and personalized genomics (as a hunt for bugs in the human code); genome editing (code injection) to cure the incurable; and the source code behind amazing animal adaptations. Algorithmic approaches will introduce ideas from computational genomics, machine learning and natural language processing. Course includes primers on molecular biology, and text processing languages. No prerequisites.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

CS 275: Translational Bioinformatics (BIOE 217, BIOMEDIN 217, GENE 217)

Computational methods for the translation of biomedical data into diagnostic, prognostic, and therapeutic applications in medicine. Topics: multi-scale omics data generation and analysis, utility and limitations of public biomedical resources, machine learning and data mining, issues and opportunities in drug discovery, and mobile/digital health solutions. Case studies and course project. Prerequisites: programming ability at the level of CS 106A and familiarity with biology and statistics.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)
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