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81 - 90 of 101 results for: CARDCOURSES::identity

MUSIC 146J: Studies in Ethnomusicology: Listening to the Local: Music Ethnography of the Bay Area (ANTHRO 146J, CSRE 146J, MUSIC 246J)

An introduction to music ethnography through student research on musical life in the Bay Area. Focus is on the intersections of music, social life, and cultural practice by engaging with people as they perform music and culture in situ. Techniques taught include participant-observation, interviewing and oral history, writing field-notes, recording, transcription, analysis, and ethnographic writing. Pre-/co-requisite (for music majors): MUSIC 22. (WIM at 4 units only.)
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-AmerCul, WAY-A-II, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

MUSIC 246J: Studies in Ethnomusicology: Listening to the Local: Music Ethnography of the Bay Area (ANTHRO 146J, CSRE 146J, MUSIC 146J)

An introduction to music ethnography through student research on musical life in the Bay Area. Focus is on the intersections of music, social life, and cultural practice by engaging with people as they perform music and culture in situ. Techniques taught include participant-observation, interviewing and oral history, writing field-notes, recording, transcription, analysis, and ethnographic writing. Pre-/co-requisite (for music majors): MUSIC 22. (WIM at 4 units only.)
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Schultz, A. (PI)

POLISCI 74: Presidential Politics: Race, Gender, and Inequality in the 2016 Election (AFRICAAM 12, CSRE 12)

From the 2016 nomination process to the election.The complexities of identity and its role in uniting and dividing the electorate. Panels covering the media, political participation, and group affiliation.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Autumn 2016 | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

PSYC 286: Culture and Madness: Anthropological and Psychiatric Approaches to Mental Illness (ANTHRO 186, ANTHRO 286, HUMBIO 146)

Unusual mental phenomena have existed throughout history and across cultures. Taught by an anthropologist and psychiatrist, this course explores how different societies construct the notions of "madness": What are the boundaries between "normal" and "abnormal", reason and unreason, mind and body, diversity and disease? nnOptional: The course will be taught in conjunction with an optional two-unit discussion section or engaged learning component.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

PSYCH 150B: RACE AND CRIME PRACTICUM (CSRE 150B)

This practicum is designed to build on the lessons learned in Psych 150: Race & Crime. In this community service learning course, students will participate in community partnerships relevant to race and crime, as well as reflection to connect these experiences to research and course content. Interested students should complete an application for permission at: https://goo.gl/forms/CAut7RKX6MewBIuG3. nnPrerequisite: Psych 150 (taken concurrently or previously).
Terms: Spr | Units: 2-4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

PSYCH 155: Introduction to Comparative Studies in Race and Ethnicity (CSRE 196C, ENGLISH 172D, SOC 146, TAPS 165)

How different disciplines approach topics and issues central to the study of ethnic and race relations in the U.S. and elsewhere. Lectures by senior faculty affiliated with CSRE. Discussions led by CSRE teaching fellows. Includes an optional Haas Center for Public Service certified Community Engaged Learning section.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-AmerCul, WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

RELIGST 162X: Spirituality and Nonviolent Urban and Social Transformation (CSRE 162A, URBANST 126)

A life of engagement in social transformation is often built on a foundation of spiritual and religious commitments. Case studies of nonviolent social change agents including Rosa Parks in the civil rights movement, César Chávez in the labor movement, and WIlliam Sloane Coffin in the peace movement; the religious and spiritual underpinnings of their commitments. Theory and principles of nonviolence. Films and readings. Service learning component includes placements in organizations engaged in social transformation. Service Learning Course (certified by Haas Center).
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

SOC 11SC: Inequality and Poverty in the United States (CSRE 10SC)

Social inequality is a feature of all advanced industrial societies. However, some societies have more inequality than others, and some types of inequality are more prominent in some societies than in others. Inequality in the United States is greater than in many other industrialized nations and has increased dramatically in the past forty years. Economic inequality, for example, is greater today than any time since the 1920s. Growing public awareness of this inequality has sparked a vigorous debate among politicians and public protests in city streets; some that have turned violent. The Occupy Movement was driven largely by resentment against the growing concentration of economic privilege within a small segment of society. Inequality was a prominent theme in the Bernie Sanders presidential campaign. Despite these debates and protests, there is no consensus about whether anything should be done to stem this trend. nThis class will focus on three domains of inequality in the United St more »
Social inequality is a feature of all advanced industrial societies. However, some societies have more inequality than others, and some types of inequality are more prominent in some societies than in others. Inequality in the United States is greater than in many other industrialized nations and has increased dramatically in the past forty years. Economic inequality, for example, is greater today than any time since the 1920s. Growing public awareness of this inequality has sparked a vigorous debate among politicians and public protests in city streets; some that have turned violent. The Occupy Movement was driven largely by resentment against the growing concentration of economic privilege within a small segment of society. Inequality was a prominent theme in the Bernie Sanders presidential campaign. Despite these debates and protests, there is no consensus about whether anything should be done to stem this trend. nThis class will focus on three domains of inequality in the United States: social class, gender, and racial inequality. The assigned reading and discussions will examine theories and research about the origins of social inequality; how inequality and poverty is reproduced over time; the consequences of inequality and poverty; and what might be done to reduce inequality and poverty in American society. Students will be expected to help lead and participate in class discussions, and to complete a weekly assignment based on the readings. nnIn addition to the in-class instruction, students will have an opportunity to engage in public service activities directly related to poverty and inequality. Students will work with the Director of Community Engaged Learning (DCEL) from the Center for Comparative Studies in Race and Ethnicity who will assist with their participation in activities connected with social service agencies in the area, including agencies that deal with homelessness, food insecurity, and other needs.
Terms: Sum | Units: 2 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Snipp, C. (PI)

SOC 146: Introduction to Comparative Studies in Race and Ethnicity (CSRE 196C, ENGLISH 172D, PSYCH 155, TAPS 165)

How different disciplines approach topics and issues central to the study of ethnic and race relations in the U.S. and elsewhere. Lectures by senior faculty affiliated with CSRE. Discussions led by CSRE teaching fellows. Includes an optional Haas Center for Public Service certified Community Engaged Learning section.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-AmerCul, WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

SOC 164: Immigration and the Changing United States (CHILATST 164, CSRE 164, SOC 264)

The role of race and ethnicity in immigrant group integration in the U.S. Topics include: theories of integration; racial and ethnic identity formation; racial and ethnic change; immigration policy; intermarriage; hybrid racial and ethnic identities; comparisons between contemporary and historical waves of immigration.
Terms: not given next year, last offered Spring 2015 | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
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