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31 - 40 of 90 results for: CARDCOURSES::identity

CSRE 125E: Shades of Green: Redesigning and Rethinking the Environmental Justice Movements (EARTHSYS 125, EARTHSYS 225, URBANST 125)

Historically, discussions of race, ethnicity, culture, and equity in the environment have been relegated to the environmental justice movement, which often focuses on urban environmental degradation and remains separated from other environmental movements. This course will seek to break out of this limiting discussion. We will explore access to outdoor spaces, definitions of wilderness, who is and isn't included in environmental organizations, gender and the outdoors, how colonialism has influenced ways of knowing, and the future of climate change. The course will also have a design thinking community partnership project. Students will work with partner organizations to problem-solve around issues of access and diversity. We value a diversity of experiences and epistemological beliefs, and therefore undergraduates and graduate students from all disciplines are welcome.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Winter 2018 | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

CSRE 145H: Trauma, healing, and empowerment (LIFE 145)

This course will look at the ways in which humans are affected by the legacy of war, occupation and colonialism through themes of home, displacement, community, roots, identity, and inter-generational trauma. The approach is integrative, including scholarly investigation, embodied practice, and creative approach. This self-reflective process uses narrative, oral and written, as a means of becoming whole and healing personal, historical, and collective wounds.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

CSRE 146: Community Matters: Research and Service with Community Organizations

(Taught in conjunction with URBANST 123B. Students participating in CRSI must enroll in CSRE 146. All others can enroll in either course.) This course focuses on issues of research design and how to select specific methodological strategies to assure ethical and effective partnership-based research. In this course, students will plan for their own participation in a CB(P)R project. Topical themes will include best practice strategies for (a) defining and selecting community problems or issues to be addressed, (b) generating relevant and useful research questions, (c) choosing specific means and methods for data collection [e.g., surveys, interviews, focus groups, etc.], (d) storing, organizing and analyzing data, (e) reflecting on and critiquing research findings, and (f) carrying out dissemination in ways that can be expected to enhance community power and advance community development. Students will be provided with opportunities to workshop their respective projects-in-development, (e.g., developing and sharing research questions, data collection instruments, strategies for engaging community constituents as co-researchers, etc.). Students will leave the course with a plan for participating in a CBPR project.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

CSRE 150B: RACE AND CRIME PRACTICUM

This practicum is designed to build on the lessons learned in Psych 150: Race & Crime. In this community service learning course, students will participate in community partnerships relevant to race and crime, as well as reflection to connect these experiences to research and course content. Interested students should complete an application for permission at: https://goo.gl/forms/CAut7RKX6MewBIuG3. nnPrerequisite: Psych 150 (taken concurrently or previously).
Terms: not given this year, last offered Spring 2018 | Units: 2-4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

CSRE 157P: Solidarity and Racial Justice (AFRICAAM 157P, AMSTUD 157P, FEMGEN 157P)

Is multiracial solidarity necessary to overcome oppression that disproportionately affects certain communities of color? What is frontline leadership and what role should people play if they are not part of frontline communities? In this course we will critically examine practices of solidarity and allyship in movements for collective liberation. Through analysis of historical and contemporary movements, as well as participation in movement work, we will see how movements have built multiracial solidarity to address issues that are important to the liberation of all. We will also see how racial justice intersects with other identities and issues. This course is for students that want to learn how to practice solidarity, whether to be better allies or to work more effectively with allies. There will be a community engaged learning option for this course. Students who choose to participate in this option will either work with Stanford's DGen Office or a community organization that is explicitly devoted to multiracial movement-building.
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

CSRE 162A: Spirituality and Nonviolent Urban and Social Transformation (RELIGST 162X, URBANST 126)

A life of engagement in social transformation is often built on a foundation of spiritual and religious commitments. Case studies of nonviolent social change agents including Rosa Parks in the civil rights movement, César Chávez in the labor movement, and WIlliam Sloane Coffin in the peace movement; the religious and spiritual underpinnings of their commitments. Theory and principles of nonviolence. Films and readings. Service learning component includes placements in organizations engaged in social transformation. Service Learning Course (certified by Haas Center).
Terms: not given next year, last offered Winter 2018 | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

CSRE 164: Immigration and the Changing United States (CHILATST 164, SOC 164, SOC 264)

The role of race and ethnicity in immigrant group integration in the U.S. Topics include: theories of integration; racial and ethnic identity formation; racial and ethnic change; immigration policy; intermarriage; hybrid racial and ethnic identities; comparisons between contemporary and historical waves of immigration.
Terms: not given next year, last offered Spring 2015 | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

CSRE 166B: Immigration Debates in America, Past and Present (HISTORY 166B, HISTORY 366B)

Examines the ways in which the immigration of people from around the world and migration within the United States shaped American nation-building and ideas about national identity in the twentieth century. Focuses on how conflicting ideas about race, gender, ethnicity, and citizenship with respect to particular groups led to policies both of exclusion and integration. Part One begins with the ways in which the American views of race and citizenship in the colonial period through the post-Reconstruction Era led to the passage of the Chinese Exclusion Act in 1882 and subsequently to broader exclusions of immigrants from other parts of Asia, Southern and Eastern Europe, and Mexico. Explores how World War II and the Cold War challenged racial ideologies and led to policies of increasing liberalization culminating in the passage of the 1965 Immigration Act, which eliminated quotas based on national origins and opened the door for new waves of immigrants, especially from Asia and Latin America. Part Two considers new immigration patterns after 1965, including those of refugees, and investigates the contemporary debate over immigration and immigration policy in the post 9/11 era as well as inequalities within the system and the impact of foreign policy on exclusions and inclusions.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Winter 2015 | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

CSRE 168: New Citizenship: Grassroots Movements for Social Justice in the U.S. (ANTHRO 169A, CHILATST 168, FEMGEN 140H)

Focus is on the contributions of immigrants and communities of color to the meaning of citizenship in the U.S. Citizenship, more than only a legal status, is a dynamic cultural field in which people claim equal rights while demanding respect for differences. Academic studies of citizenship examined in dialogue with the theory and practice of activists and movements. Engagement with immigrant organizing and community-based research is a central emphasis.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Winter 2014 | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

CSRE 180E: Introduction to Chicanx/Latinx Studies (CHILATST 180E)

This course draws on intersectional and interdisciplinary approaches to introduce students to the range of issues, experiences, and methodologies that form the foundation of Latina/o/x studies. By considering the relationship between the creation of ¿Latinx¿ and ¿American¿ identities, students will critically reconsider the borders that constitute the U.S. as a political and cultural formation. The course balances depth and breadth in its study of the variety of perspectives and experiences that come to be associated with U.S. Latinxs. Thus, we will analyze the histories of predominant U.S. Latinx sub-groups, such as Mexicans/Chicanxs and Puerto Ricans, while also incorporating considerations of the ways in which broader populations with ties to Central America, South America, and the Caribbean play crucial roles in constituting U.S. Latinx identities. Topics include the U.S./Mexico border and the borderlands; (im)migration and diaspora; literary and cultural traditions; music and expressive practices; labor and structural inequality; social movements; Latinx urbanism; gender and sexuality; political and economic shifts; and inter- and intra-group relations. Sources include a range of social science and humanities scholarship.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-AmerCul | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Rosa, J. (PI)
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