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51 - 60 of 69 results for: CSI::energy-environment ; Currently searching offered courses. You can also include unoffered courses

ENVRES 290: Capstone Project Seminar in Environment and Resources

Required for and limited to E-IPER Joint M.S. students. Propose, conduct and publicly present final individual or team projects demonstrating the integration of professional (M.B.A., J.D., or M.D.) and M.S. in Environment and Resources degrees. Presentation and submission of final product required. 3 total units required; can all be taken during one quarter or divided over two sequential quarters.
Terms: Aut, Win | Units: 1-3 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ENVRES 380: Collaborating with the Future: Launching Large Scale Sustainable Transformations

This project-based d.school class combines Design Thinking with Systems Thinking, with the goal of designing interventions to large scale, complex and systemic challenges. This class draws from System theory, Behavioral Sciences, elements of Diffusion Theory, and a methodology for scaled transformation. Tools and theories introduced in class will be used to structure large-scale transformations that simultaneously create value on environmental, societal, and economic fronts. This is a project-based class involving team-based, real world challenges that are all complex and scaled. Primarily meant for Graduate Students (especially qualified/motivated Seniors will be considered). Admission to the class is through an application process through the d.school. Please find instructions and applications at the d.school class applications website.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-4 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ESS 270: Analyzing land use in a globalized world (ESS 170)

This course examines the dynamics of land use in relation to globalization. The objective is to understand how the expansion of global trade, and public and private regulations affect land use changes. The course will enable students to better understand how to effectively influence land use change, from different vantage points (government, NGO, corporate actor¿). The main emphasis is on tropical regions. Lectures introduce theories, practical cases, and evaluation tools to better understand contemporary land use dynamics.
Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Lambin, E. (PI)

ESS 280: Principles and Practices of Sustainable Agriculture (EARTHSYS 180)

Field-based training in ecologically sound agricultural practices at the Stanford Community Farm. Weekly lessons, field work, and group projects. Field trips to educational farms in the area. Topics include: soils, composting, irrigation techniques, IPM, basic plant anatomy and physiology, weeds, greenhouse management, and marketing.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-4 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Archie, P. (PI)

ESS 282: Designing Educational Gardens (EARTHSYS 182)

A project-based course emphasizing 'ways of doing 's sustainable agricultural systems based at the new Stanford Educational Farm. Students will work individually and in small groups on the design of a new educational garden and related programs for the Stanford Educational Farm. The class will meet on 6 Fridays over the course of winter quarter. Class meetings will include an introduction to designing learning gardens and affiliated programs, 3 field trips to exemplary educational gardens in the bay area that will include tours and discussions with garden educators, and work sessions for student projects. By application only.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 2 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

ESS 305: Climate Change: An Earth Systems Perspective

This is an introductory graduate-level course that is intended to provide an overview of leading-edge research topics in the area of climate change. Lectures introduce the physical, biogeochemical, ecological, and human dimensions of climate change, with emphasis on understanding climate change from an Earth System perspective (e.g., nonlinearities, feedbacks, thresholds, tipping points, resilience, vulnerability, risk). The emphasis is on providing an initial introduction to the process by which researchers pose questions and analyze and interpret results.
Terms: Aut | Units: 2 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

GSBGEN 335: Clean Energy Project Development and Finance

This case study-oriented course will focus on the critical skills needed to evaluate, develop, finance (on a non-recourse basis), and complete standalone energy and infrastructure projects. The primary course materials will be documents from several representative projects - e.g. solar, wind, storage, carbon capture - covering key areas including market and feasibility studies, environmental permitting and regulatory decisions, financial disclosure from bank and bond transactions, and construction, input, and offtake contracts. Documents and economic models tend to be highly customized. By taking a forensic approach, looking at several different projects, we can learn how project developers, financiers, and lawyers work to get deals over the finish line that meet the demands of the market, the requirements of the law, and (sometimes) broader societal goals, in particular climate change, economic competitiveness, and energy security.
Units: 3 | Grading: GSB Letter Graded

GSBGEN 336: Energy Markets and Policy

This is a course on how energy and environmental markets work, and the regulatory mechanisms that have been and can be used to achieve desired policy goals. The course uses a electricity market game as a central teaching tool. In the game, students play the role of electricity generators and retailers in order to gain an understanding of how market rules (including environmental regulations and renewable energy mandates) affect the business strategy of market participants - and in turn economic and environmental outcomes.nnThe goal of the course is to provide students with both theoretical and hands-on understanding of important energy and environmental market concepts that are critical to market functioning but not always widely appreciated. Concepts covered include: 1) regulated price-setting versus price-setting through market mechanisms, 2) BTU arbitragenin input energy choices, 3) uniform price vs. pay-as-bid auctions, 4) the ability and incentive to exercise unilateral market pow more »
This is a course on how energy and environmental markets work, and the regulatory mechanisms that have been and can be used to achieve desired policy goals. The course uses a electricity market game as a central teaching tool. In the game, students play the role of electricity generators and retailers in order to gain an understanding of how market rules (including environmental regulations and renewable energy mandates) affect the business strategy of market participants - and in turn economic and environmental outcomes.nnThe goal of the course is to provide students with both theoretical and hands-on understanding of important energy and environmental market concepts that are critical to market functioning but not always widely appreciated. Concepts covered include: 1) regulated price-setting versus price-setting through market mechanisms, 2) BTU arbitragenin input energy choices, 3) uniform price vs. pay-as-bid auctions, 4) the ability and incentive to exercise unilateral market power, 5) unilateral versus coordinated exercise of market power, 6) transmission congestion, 7) forward contracts and their effect on market functioning, 8) dynamic pricing of electricity and active involvement of final demand, 9) the nature of energy reserves, 10) carbon pricing mechanisms including taxes and cap-and trade systems, 11) renewable portfolio standards and other renewable energy incentives, 12) determination of levelized cost of energy (LCOE) and its impact on new capacity investment decisions, and 13) interactions between environmental mechanisms and regulations. We will also discuss the key features of the markets for major sources of energy such as oil, natural gas, coal, nuclear, solar, wind, and biomass.nnThe course is useful background for private sector roles in energy production, research, management, trading, investment, and government and regulatory affairs; government positions in policymaking and regulation; research and policy functions in academia, think tanks, or consultancies; and non-profit advocacy roles related to energy and the environment.
Units: 3 | Grading: GSB Student Option LTR/PF

GSBGEN 532: Clean Energy Opportunities

This course examines business models and opportunities related to clean energy, specifically to low-carbon energy. We examine emerging trends for this sector in the context of technological change, business opportunities and the parameters set by public policy.
Units: 2 | Grading: GSB Student Option LTR/PF

GSBGEN 569: The Open Road: Innovation in Cars, Driving, and Mobility

This course will look at ongoing and upcoming innovation in cars, driving, and mobility from three perspectives: (1) technology, (2) economics & business Models, and (3) policy. We'll survey changes in powering vehicles (e.g. electrification and biofuels), in vehicle connectivity and communications, and most especially changes in autonomy and self-driving vehicles. We'll look at changes in the economics of cars, vehicles, and driving ¿new business models, shared ownership, mobility as a service, as well as who some of the major players are in this nascent field and what they're doing/developing. And we'll explore the interactions of technology and economics with policy and broader societal changes-¿direct effects like safety, legal liability, and who can drive; indirect effects on traffic, insurance, infrastructure needs, fuel taxes, and the environment; as well as longer-term and even bigger changes in daily life and where and how we live, work, and drive.
Units: 2 | Grading: GSB Letter Graded
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