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41 - 50 of 70 results for: CSI::energy-environment ; Currently searching offered courses. You can also include unoffered courses

ENERGY 101A: Energizing California

A weekend field trip featuring renewable and nonrenewable energy installations in Northern California. Tour geothermal, bioenergy, and natural gas field sites with expert guides from the Department of Energy Resources Engineering. Requirements: One campus meeting and weekend field trip. Enrollment limited to 25. Freshman have first choice.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

ENERGY 102: Fundamentals of Renewable Power (EARTHSYS 102)

Do you want a much better understanding of renewable power technologies? Did you know that wind and solar are the fastest growing forms of electricity generation? Are you interested in hearing about the most recent, and future, designs for green power? Do you want to understand what limits power extraction from renewable resources and how current designs could be improved? This course dives deep into these and related issues for wind, solar, biomass, geothermal, tidal and wave power technologies. We welcome all student, from non-majors to MBAs and grad students. If you are potentially interested in an energy or environmental related major, this course is particularly useful. Recommended: Math 21 or 42.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ENERGY 104: Sustainable Energy for 9 Billion

This course explores the transition to a sustainable energy system at large scales (national and global), and over long time periods (decades). Explores the drivers of global energy demand and the fundamentals of technologies that can meet this demand sustainably. Focuses on constraints affecting large-scale deployment of technologies, as well as inertial factors affecting this transition. Problems will involve modeling global energy demand, deployment rates for sustainable technologies, technological learning and economics of technical change. Recommended: ENERGY 101, 102.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-AQR | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ENERGY 110: Engineering Economics

The success of energy projects and companies is judged by technical, economic and financial criteria. This course will introduce concepts of engineering economy, e.g., time value of money, life cycle costs and financial metrics, and explore their application to the business of energy. We will use case studies, business school cases and possibly industry guest lecturers. Examples from the hydrocarbon businesses that dominate energy today will provide the framework for the analysis of both conventional and renewable energy.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ENERGY 123: When Technology Meets Reality; An In-depth Look at the Deepwater Horizon Blowout and Oil Spill

The Deepwater Horizon blowout and spill in April 2010 occurred on one of the most advanced deepwater drilling rigs in the world operated by one of the most experienced companies. In this course we will look at and discuss the technologies and management practices involved in deepwater drilling and discuss how an accident like this happens and what could have been done differently to avoid it. We will focus on the Horizon and also look briefly at other high profile industrial and technological accidents.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Sears, R. (PI)

ENERGY 160: Modeling Uncertainty in the Earth Sciences

Whether Earth Science modeling is performed on a local, regional or global scale, for scientific or engineering purposes, uncertainty is inherently present due to lack of data and lack of understanding of the underlying phenomena. This course highlights the various issues, techniques and practical tools available for modeling uncertainty of complex Earth systems as well as the impact uncertainty has on practical decisions for geo-engineering problems. The course focuses on practical breadth rather than theoretical depth. Topics covered are: the process of building models, sources of uncertainty, probabilistic techniques, spatial data analysis and geostatistics, grid and scale, spatio-temporal uncertainty, visualizing uncertainty in large dimensions, Monte Carlo simulation, sensitivity analysis, reducing uncertainty with data, value of information. Applications to both local (reservoir, aquifer) and global (climate) are covered through literature study. Extensive software use with SGEMS.nnPrerequisites: algebra ( CME 104 or equivalent), introductory statistics course ( CME 106 or equivalent).
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ENERGY 171: Energy Infrastructure, Technology and Economics (ENERGY 271)

Oil and gas represents more than 50% of global primary energy. In delivering energy at scale, the industry has developed global infrastructure with supporting technology that gives it enormous advantages in energy markets; this course explores how the oil and gas industry operates. From the perspective of these established systems and technologies, we will look at the complexity of energy systems, and will consider how installed infrastructure enables technology development and deployment, impacts energy supply, and how existing infrastructure and capital invested in fossil energy impacts renewable energy development. Prerequisites: Energy 101 and 102 or permission of instructor.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ENERGY 214: The Global Price of Oil

Understanding the current and future price of oil requires the synthesis of geologic, engineering, financial, geopolitical, and macroeconomic information. In this seminar, we will build a global supply curve for petroleum by studying the marginal and full-cycle production costs for each of the major resource categories. We will study how reserve classification varies globally, and how global petroleum resources and reserves have changed and are likely to change over time. We will further investigate how the time lag between resource discovery, project sanctioning, and full production will affect future supply. Finally, we will study the elasticity of oil demand and how that demand is likely to change over time as the developing world gets richer and as competition from other energy sources increases.
Terms: Spr | Units: 2 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ENERGY 271: Energy Infrastructure, Technology and Economics (ENERGY 171)

Oil and gas represents more than 50% of global primary energy. In delivering energy at scale, the industry has developed global infrastructure with supporting technology that gives it enormous advantages in energy markets; this course explores how the oil and gas industry operates. From the perspective of these established systems and technologies, we will look at the complexity of energy systems, and will consider how installed infrastructure enables technology development and deployment, impacts energy supply, and how existing infrastructure and capital invested in fossil energy impacts renewable energy development. Prerequisites: Energy 101 and 102 or permission of instructor.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ENVRES 225: E-IPER Current Topics Seminar

For E-IPER Ph.D and Joint M.S. students only. Weekly presentations of E-IPER students' research and other program-related projects. Occasional guest speakers. Individual or team presentation, active participation, and regular attendance required for credit. May be taken for credit a maximum of two times.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: Barsom, S. (PI)
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