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21 - 30 of 69 results for: CSI::energy-environment ; Currently searching offered courses. You can also include unoffered courses

CEE 272R: Modern Power Systems Engineering

Focus is on Power Engineering from a systems point of view. Topics covered may include modeling of generation, transmission and distribution systems, load flow analysis, transient and steady-state stability analysis. Special emphasis given to modern market operations and dispatch, modeling intermittent controllable power sources, storage technologies, mechanisms for demand response, sensing the grid and the role of market mechanisms for deep integration. Course content may vary year to year.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

CEE 272T: SmartGrids and Advanced Power Systems Seminar (EE 292T)

A series of seminar and lectures focused on power engineering. Renowned researchers from universities and national labs will deliver bi-weekly seminars on the state of the art of power system engineering. Seminar topics may include: power system analysis and simulation, control and stability, new market mechanisms, computation challenges and solutions, detection and estimation, and the role of communications in the grid. The instructors will cover relevant background materials in the in-between weeks. The seminars are planned to continue throughout the next academic year, so the course may be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-2 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

CEE 273B: The Business of Water

One of the fastest growing economic sectors is the water field, and private water companies are playing an increasingly important role in improving water management around the world. In some cases, however, the involvement of private companies in the water sector has also proven controversial (e.g., when private companies have taken over public water supply systems in developing countries such as Bolivia). This course will look at established or emerging businesses in the water sector and the legal, economic, and social issues that they generate. These businesses include investor-owned water utilities, water technology companies (e.g., companies investing in new desalination or water recycling technologies), water-right funds (who directly buy and sell water rights), social impact funds, innovative agricultural operations, water concessionaires, and infrastructure construction companies and investors. Each week will focus on a different business and company. Company executives will att more »
One of the fastest growing economic sectors is the water field, and private water companies are playing an increasingly important role in improving water management around the world. In some cases, however, the involvement of private companies in the water sector has also proven controversial (e.g., when private companies have taken over public water supply systems in developing countries such as Bolivia). This course will look at established or emerging businesses in the water sector and the legal, economic, and social issues that they generate. These businesses include investor-owned water utilities, water technology companies (e.g., companies investing in new desalination or water recycling technologies), water-right funds (who directly buy and sell water rights), social impact funds, innovative agricultural operations, water concessionaires, and infrastructure construction companies and investors. Each week will focus on a different business and company. Company executives will attend the class session and discuss their business with the class. In most classes, we will examine (1) the viability and efficacy of the company's business plan, (2) the legal and/or social issues arising from the business' work, and (3) how the business might contribute to improved water management and policy. Each student will be expected to write (1) two short reflection papers during the course of the quarter on businesses that present to the class, and (2) a 15-page paper at the conclusion on the class on either a water company of the student's choice or a policy initiative that can improve the role that business plays in improving water management (either in a particular sector or more generally). Elements used in grading: Attendance, Class Participation, Written Assignments, Final Paper. Cross-listed with Civil & Environmental Engineering.
Terms: Win | Units: 2 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

CEE 277S: Design for a Sustainable World (CEE 177S)

Technology-based problems faced by developing communities worldwide. Student groups partner with organizations abroad to work on concept, feasibility, design, implementation, and evaluation phases of various projects. Past projects include a water and health initiative, a green school design, seismic safety, and medical device. Admission based on written application and interview. See http://esw.stanford.edu for application. (Staff)
Terms: Spr | Units: 1-5 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: Mitch, W. (PI)

CEE 277X: Current Topics in Sustainable Engineering (CEE 177X)

This course is the first half of a two quarter, project-based design course that addresses the cultural, political, organizational, technical, and business issues at the heart of implementing sustainable engineering projects in the developing world. Students will be placed into one of three project teams and tackle a real-world design challenge in partnership with social entrepreneurs and NGOs. In CEE 177X/277X, students will gain the background skills and context necessary to effectively design engineering projects in developing nations. (Cardinal Course certified by the Haas Center). Instructor consent required.
Terms: Win | Units: 1-3 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: Mitch, W. (PI)

CEE 278A: Air Pollution Fundamentals

The sources and health effects of gaseous and particulate air pollutants. The influence of meteorology on pollution: temperature profiles, stability classes, inversion layers, turbulence. Atmospheric diffusion equations, downwind dispersion of emissions from point and line sources. Removal of air pollutants via settling, diffusion, coagulation, precipitation, Mechanisms for ozone formation, in the troposphere versus in the stratosphere. Effects of airborne particle size and composition on light scattering/absorption, and on visual range. Prerequisites: MATH 51 or equivalent. Recommended: 101B, CHEM 31A, or equivalents.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

CEE 301: The Energy Seminar (ENERGY 301, MS&E 494)

Interdisciplinary exploration of current energy challenges and opportunities, with talks by faculty, visitors, and students. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: Weyant, J. (PI)

CEE 323C: Infrastructure Finance and Governance

Presentation and discussion of early stage or more mature research on a variety of topics related to financing, governance and sustainability of civil infrastructure projects by researchers associated with the Global Projects Center and visiting speakers. To obtain one unit of credit, students must attend and participate in all seminars, with up to two excused absences. Seminar meets weekly during Autumn, Winter and Spring Quarters.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: Levitt, R. (PI)

EARTHSYS 104: The Water Course (GEOPHYS 70)

The pathway that water takes from rainfall to the tap using student home towns as an example. How the geological environment controls the quantity and quality of water; taste tests of water from around the world. Current U.S. and world water supply issues.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-AQR, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Knight, R. (PI)

EARTHSYS 288: Social and Environmental Tradeoffs in Climate Decision-Making (EARTHSYS 188)

How can we ensure that measures taken to mitigate global climate change don't create larger social and environmental problems? What metrics should be used to compare potential climate solutions beyond cost and technical feasibility, and how should these metrics be weighed against each other? How can modeling efforts and stakeholder engagement be best integrated into climate decision making? What information are we still missing to make fully informed decisions between technologies and policies? Exploration of these questions, alongside other issues related to potential negative externalities of emerging climate solutions. Evaluation of energy, land use, and geoengineering approaches in an integrated context, culminating in a climate stabilization group project.
Terms: Win | Units: 1-2 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
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