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321 - 329 of 329 results for: all courses

TAPS 178B: Intensive Playwriting (CSRE 178B, TAPS 278)

Intermediate level study of fundamentals of playwriting through an intensive play development process. Course emphasizes visual scripting for the stage and play revision. Script analysis of works by contemporary playwrights may include: Suzan-Lori Parks, Tony Kushner, Adrienne Kennedy, Edward Albee, Maria Irene Fornes and others. Table readings of full length work required by quarter¿s end.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

TAPS 180P: Color (ARTSTUDI 180)

Hands-on study of color to develop color sensitivity and the ability to manipulate color to exploit its expressive potential. Guided experimentation and observation. Topics include color relativity, color and light, color mixing, color harmony, and color and content. (lower level)
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3-4 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

TAPS 210V: Vocal Production and Audition

An introductory study of the vocal mechanism and the development of voice and articulation for the stage. Students will be introduced to the actor's tools of phonetics, verbal action and text analysis. Vocal technique will then be applied to the actor's process in preparation for audition. Actors will fully participate in the audition process, from beginning to end. Emphasis will be on relaxation, selection of appropriate material, and versatility to show contrast and range.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 1-3 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

TAPS 278: Intensive Playwriting (CSRE 178B, TAPS 178B)

Intermediate level study of fundamentals of playwriting through an intensive play development process. Course emphasizes visual scripting for the stage and play revision. Script analysis of works by contemporary playwrights may include: Suzan-Lori Parks, Tony Kushner, Adrienne Kennedy, Edward Albee, Maria Irene Fornes and others. Table readings of full length work required by quarter¿s end.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

THINK 21: Folklore and Literature in Russia and Beyond: Vampires, Talking Cats, and Frog Princesses

What is 'folklore' and what is its purpose? How do we decide if something is authentically 'folk' and does it matter? Why are Eastern Europe and Russia associated with the idea of folklore? For the past two centuries, writers, composers, and artists have found inspiration in folklore: the stories, songs, and beliefs of their grandparents, their servants (or their slaves), and their neighbors. This class asks what folklore means and what purposes - political and philosophical as well as artistic - it can serve. We begin with examples from around the world: the German Brothers Grimm as well as the Americans John and Alan Lomax. Then we turn to Eastern Europe and the role it has played in the Western European and American imagination as the home of the archaic and the authentic, from the vampires of Transylvania to the oral epics of the Bosnian Serbs to the nostalgic idea of the Jewish shtetl to the fantasy of Soviet communism as a survival of a pre-capitalist order. Students will analyze both folk and elite texts, and will experiment with gathering oral texts and transforming them just like the writers we studied.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: THINK, WAY-A-II, WAY-CE | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

THINK 49: Stories Everywhere

Do we perceive the world through stories? Are we made of stories? Can we make sense of the world without narrative? The telling of stories is not just a form of entertainment but an essential human activity that moves and persuades us, compelling us to action and reflection. In this course, we will probe how moral, cognitive and historical forces give stories their power. You will be introduced to the basic theory and art of storytelling, enabling you to understand and master the fundamentals of narrative structure, plot, and character. This will allow you to practice producing your own stories through both interpretative and creative writing assignments. The class will also give students the chance to participate in various story-making activities and work with the Stanford Storytelling Project, San Francisco StoryCorps, School of the Arts and the Stanford Innocence Project to create assignments that would be useful to both private and nonprofit organizations.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: THINK, WAY-A-II, WAY-CE | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

THINK 50: Empathy

This course will introduce freshmen to a range of ways of thinking about empathy. How do we know and understand the other? How does knowledge of another's experience and circumstances enable us to make moral decisions and take moral actions? It will take students on an intellectual investigation of the topic of empathy from the Buddhist emphasis on compassion in the fifth century BCE to Jesus' teaching of parables in the first century CE to Enlightenment philosophy to Silicon Valley¿s adoption of empathy in the twenty-first century. The main focus will be on the modern period (from the 18th to 20th century) and students will be asked to approach different genres of text through the lens of empathy. The course will culminate with a one-week creative workshop on the question of empathy.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: THINK, WAY-CE, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

URBANST 113: Introduction to Urban Design: Contemporary Urban Design in Theory and Practice

Comparative studies in neighborhood conservation, inner city regeneration, and growth policies for metropolitan regions. Lect-disc and research focusing on case studies from North America and abroad, team urban design projects. Two Saturday class workshops in San Francisco: 2nd and 4th Saturdays of the quarter. Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DBSocSci | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-CE, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Glanz, D. (PI)

URBANST 171: Urban Design Studio (CEE 131D)

The practical application of urban design theory. Projects focus on designing neighborhood and downtown regions to balance livability, revitalization, population growth, and historic preservation.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Glanz, D. (PI)
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