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301 - 310 of 349 results for: all courses

PWR 91EP: Intermediate Writing: Communicating Climate Change: Navigating the Stories from the Frontlines (EARTHSYS 154)

In the next two decades floods, droughts and famine caused by climate change will displace more than 250 million people around the world. In this course students will develop an increased understanding of how different stakeholders including scientists, aid organizations, locals, policy makers, activists, and media professionals communicate the climate change crisis. They will select a site experiencing the devastating effects and research the voices telling the stories of those sites and the audiences who are (or are not) listening. Students might want to investigate drought-ridden areas such as the Central Valley of California or Darfur, Sudan; Alpine glaciers melting in the Alps or in Alaska; the increasingly flooded Pacific islands; the hurricane ravaged Gulf Coast, among many others. Data from various stakeholders will be analyzed and synthesized for a magazine length article designed to bring attention to a region and/or issue that has previously been neglected. Students will wri more »
In the next two decades floods, droughts and famine caused by climate change will displace more than 250 million people around the world. In this course students will develop an increased understanding of how different stakeholders including scientists, aid organizations, locals, policy makers, activists, and media professionals communicate the climate change crisis. They will select a site experiencing the devastating effects and research the voices telling the stories of those sites and the audiences who are (or are not) listening. Students might want to investigate drought-ridden areas such as the Central Valley of California or Darfur, Sudan; Alpine glaciers melting in the Alps or in Alaska; the increasingly flooded Pacific islands; the hurricane ravaged Gulf Coast, among many others. Data from various stakeholders will be analyzed and synthesized for a magazine length article designed to bring attention to a region and/or issue that has previously been neglected. Students will write and submit their article for publication.nnFor students who have completed the first two levels of the writing requirement and want further work in developing writing abilities, especially within discipline-specific contexts and nonfiction genres. Individual conferences with instructor and peer workshops. Prerequisite: first two levels of the writing requirement or equivalent transfer credit. For more information, see https://undergrad.stanford.edu/programs/pwr/explore/notation-science-writing.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

PWR 91F: Finding Your Story

Life challenges us to become aware of the stories that shape us--family stories, cultural mythologies, even popular movies, television shows, and songs--and then create and live our own story. We face this challenge throughout our lives but perhaps most acutely as we move into adulthood; this is the period when we most need to become conscious of stories and their power, to gather wisdom, practices, and resources for finding our own story. This class, designed with seniors in mind, will illuminate and explore these resources and give you the opportunity to reflect deeply, in discussion and writing, on what truly calls to you in this life. We will engage with some of the world's great stories--myths, parables, teaching tales, modern fiction, even aphorisms, koans, and riddles. In them we can find both elements that resonate with our own story and provocations that help us unearth and cultivate our native gifts--the genius in each of us. We will look at short excerpts from masterworks an more »
Life challenges us to become aware of the stories that shape us--family stories, cultural mythologies, even popular movies, television shows, and songs--and then create and live our own story. We face this challenge throughout our lives but perhaps most acutely as we move into adulthood; this is the period when we most need to become conscious of stories and their power, to gather wisdom, practices, and resources for finding our own story. This class, designed with seniors in mind, will illuminate and explore these resources and give you the opportunity to reflect deeply, in discussion and writing, on what truly calls to you in this life. We will engage with some of the world's great stories--myths, parables, teaching tales, modern fiction, even aphorisms, koans, and riddles. In them we can find both elements that resonate with our own story and provocations that help us unearth and cultivate our native gifts--the genius in each of us. We will look at short excerpts from masterworks and myths from around the world, all voices in the largest conversation we have as humans, the one that asks: who am I? why am I here? what truly matters? how can I be happy? Together we will investigate how these stories, and stories like them, can be used to help us find our own story. Students in this course will have a special opportunity to meet personally with poet Billy Collins and singer Aimee Mann when they visit campus in April. Does not fulfill NSC requirement. For students who have completed the first level of the writing requirement and want further work in developing writing abilities, especially within discipline-specific contexts and nonfiction genres. Individual conferences with instructor and peer workshops. Prerequisite: first level of the writing requirement or equivalent transfer credit. For more information, see http://www.stanford.edu/dept/undergrad/cgi-bin/drupal_pwr/advanced_pwr.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

PWR 91KS: Intermediate Writing: Design Thinking and Science Communication

Effective communication of expert knowledge in the sciences to non-specialist audiences. Project-based work on a range and variety of communication challenges, contexts, and media. For students who have completed the first two levels of the writing requirement and want further work in developing writing abilities, especially within discipline-specific contexts and nonfiction genres. Individual conferences with instructor and peer workshops. Prerequisite: first two levels of the writing requirement or equivalent transfer credit. For more information, see https://undergrad.stanford.edu/programs/pwr/explore/notation-science-writing.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

PWR 91MC: Intermediate Writing : Activist Rhetoric

How do activists effectively strategize for social change? In this hands-on approach to studying activism and social justice issues, students will encounter new methods for mass communication, collaboration, and self-inquiry. First, we will consider how activists address practical problems in a variety of contexts, from protest movements to direct action, political lobbying to philanthrocapitalism, from Black Lives Matter to immigration activists. We will visit Stanford Special Collections to find inspiration in the Huey P. Newton Collection--the archive of the Black Panther Party. To inform these experiences, we will read and analyze texts by the Combahee River Collective, Angela Davis, Judith Butler, Fred Moten, and Jackie Wang, as well as inviting several activists to visit our classroom. Through collaborative and creative coursework, students will gain experience in intersectional thinking, community organizing, and collective action by conducting teach-ins, writing their own socia more »
How do activists effectively strategize for social change? In this hands-on approach to studying activism and social justice issues, students will encounter new methods for mass communication, collaboration, and self-inquiry. First, we will consider how activists address practical problems in a variety of contexts, from protest movements to direct action, political lobbying to philanthrocapitalism, from Black Lives Matter to immigration activists. We will visit Stanford Special Collections to find inspiration in the Huey P. Newton Collection--the archive of the Black Panther Party. To inform these experiences, we will read and analyze texts by the Combahee River Collective, Angela Davis, Judith Butler, Fred Moten, and Jackie Wang, as well as inviting several activists to visit our classroom. Through collaborative and creative coursework, students will gain experience in intersectional thinking, community organizing, and collective action by conducting teach-ins, writing their own social justice manifesto, and planning a final campus-wide action.nnThis course is part of the PWR advanced elective track in Social and Racial Justice (SRJ). Prerequisite: first two levels of the writing requirement or equivalent transfer credit. See https://undergrad.stanford.edu/programs/pwr/courses/advanced-courses/activist-rhetoric for full course description.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

SINY 114: Writing in the City

The craft of fiction writing and introduction to the literary culture of New York. Writing exercises will tune students¿ senses to the rhythms of New York. Students produce their own short stories, which will be examined in workshop discussions.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Orringer, J. (PI)

SINY 116: Off the iPhone and Into the City: Creating a Photography Project

Learn components of photography projects and image making including content selection, intention, context, and audience. Talks by professional photographers; field trips to in the city. Two response papers about an exhibition, publication, or long-form web project during their time in New York.
Terms: Aut, Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-CE | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Jackson, D. (PI)

SINY 140: Mapping, time, space, and culture

New York, the financial and cultural capitol of the nation, provides an extraordinary laboratory for exploring the art and science of information representation. The proposed course aims to engage students in a broad swath of art and culture, contextualized by studying the sociopolitical urban landscape.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-CE | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

STS 103Q: Reading and Writing Poetry about Science

Preference to sophomores. Students will study recent poetry inspired by the phenomena and history of the sciences in order to write such poems themselves. These poems bring sensuous human experience to bear on biology, ecology, astronomy, physics, earth science, and medicine, as well as on technological advances and calamities. Poets such as Linda Bierds, Mark Doty, Albert Goldbarth, Sarah Lindsay, W.S. Merwin, Adrienne Rich, Pattiann Rogers, Tracy K. Smith, Arthur Sze, and C. K. Williams. Grounding in poetics, research in individually chosen areas of science, weekly analytical and creative writing. Fulfills the Creative Expression requirement. Enrollment limited to 12.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

TAPS 17N: Acting for Activists

Acting for Activists is designed for students who are interested in combining acting with activism, performance with politics. We will work with theatre that responds to specific political events and crisis such as hate crimes or war through the performance of activist texts. We will also explore works that challenge inequalities of income, race, gender and sexual orientation. By the end of the course students will cultivate a critical vocabulary for discussing and critiquing work within acting/activist contexts and develop new strategies for creating theatre in relation to issues they are passionate about. Acting for Activists encourages students to think about what they want to say and helps them craft how they want to say it.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Hill, L. (PI)

TAPS 20A: Acting for Non-Majors

A class designed for all interested students. Creative play, ensemble work in a supportive environment. Designed for the student to experience a range of new creative skills, from group improvisation to partner work. Introductory work on freeing the natural voice and physical relaxation. Emphasis on rediscovering imaginative and creative impulses. Movement improvisation, listening exercises, and theater games release the energy, playfulness and willingness to take risks that is the essence of free and powerful performance. Course culminates with work on dramatic text. This version of the class is offered in summer only. During the year, students should register for TAPS 124D.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 2 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
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