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281 - 290 of 329 results for: all courses

OSPMADRD 18: Theory and Practice of Flamenco

Origins and history of flamenco and its place in Spanish culture, including both theory and actual dance instruction.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

OSPMADRD 46: Drawing with Four Spanish Masters: Goya, Velazquez, Picasso and Dali

Approaches, techniques, and processes in drawing. Visits to Madrid museums to study paintings and drawings by Goya, Velázquez, Picasso, and Dalí and to explore the experience of drawing. Subject matter: the figure, still life, interiors, landscape, and non-representational drawing. No previous experience required. Enrollment limited.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

OSPMADRD 84: Madrid Through My Eyes: A Theoreticl/Practical Documentary Film Workshop

Theoretical and practical view of Spanish language documentary cinema; potential of this type of film making as a form of personal expression. Tools for understanding and analyzing this type of cinema. Creative and analytical reflection on student 's Madrid experience; develop individual visual discourse to portray life in the city by filming a short documentary.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-CE | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

OSPPARIS 12: Paris Photography Workshop

Exploration of Paris through camera and lab techniques. Both theoretical and practical aspects of creative photography. Extensive field work. Students must bring camera or phone with camera. Enrollment limited. Taught in English.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

PWR 91CL: Intermediate Writing: Self & Science

"Self & Science" mines the intersection of memoir and science writing. In this advanced experimental writing course, students will read a selection of essays by writers including Lewis Thomas, Oliver Sacks, Annie Dillard, and Mark Doty, which illustrate the shared intellectual foundation in observation of scientific and poetic inquiry. Building on these readings, students will be challenged to produce an experimental essay that transgresses genre boundaries in the service of considering how personal reflection can narrate researched discoveries. Over the course of the quarter, students are invited to bolster their overall communication acumen, enhance their ability to share valuable discoveries beyond the confines of their major discipline, and practice the difficult bliss of engaging a discerning public audience. Click here for course video and full description: https://undergrad.stanford.edu/programs/pwr/courses/advanced-courses/self-science
Terms: not given this year | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

PWR 91D: Intermediate Writing: Your American Life

In this course, you¿ll read and listen to some of the most moving and insightful pieces of the last decade, explore the important differences between print and oral storytelling, and then script and record your own full-length audio piece. Along the way, we will explore many craft elements that apply equally to print and audio pieces. You will learn, for example, how to organize your material, choose an effective structure, blend dramatization and reflection, ground insights in concrete scenes, create a strong narrative arc, and manage elements such as characterization, description, and dialogue. We will also, of course, explore craft elements unique to the audio form and you will learn how to use your voice and other sonic elements to craft the kind of piece you might hear on This American Life.nnThrough a special arrangement with the Stanford Storytelling Project, in the spring of 2012 this course will feature special sessions with prominent contributors to This American Life. n Prerequisite: first two levels of the writing requirement or equivalent transfer credit. For more information, see http://www.stanford.edu/dept/undergrad/cgi-bin/drupal_pwr/advanced_pwr.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

PWR 91E: Intermediate Writing: The Oral Tradition: Myth, Folklore, and Fairy Tale

Contemporary storytelling covers a variety of media - from movies to novels, theatre and beyond. What this course offers is an in depth study of the roots of that practice - the oral tradition.nnnOver the course we will explore many different motifs and structures that arise in the oral tradition, myth, folklore and fairy tale. What universal themes do we detect, and what separates the progression of a pacific north west Trickster story from an Arthurian romance? Why is it that in the early twenty first century many of our most acclaimed art forms carry narrative forms that are thousands of years old? Star Wars, Lord of the Rings and the recent broadway show Jerusalem, all follow scenic progressions informed by myth.nnnThe first encounter with the story will be an oral narrative - the myth told unscripted in the classroom. The stories, which range from the Arthurian romance Parzival to Trickster folk tales, will be told in several sections - with a running exegesis and student response more »
Contemporary storytelling covers a variety of media - from movies to novels, theatre and beyond. What this course offers is an in depth study of the roots of that practice - the oral tradition.nnnOver the course we will explore many different motifs and structures that arise in the oral tradition, myth, folklore and fairy tale. What universal themes do we detect, and what separates the progression of a pacific north west Trickster story from an Arthurian romance? Why is it that in the early twenty first century many of our most acclaimed art forms carry narrative forms that are thousands of years old? Star Wars, Lord of the Rings and the recent broadway show Jerusalem, all follow scenic progressions informed by myth.nnnThe first encounter with the story will be an oral narrative - the myth told unscripted in the classroom. The stories, which range from the Arthurian romance Parzival to Trickster folk tales, will be told in several sections - with a running exegesis and student response alongside. Many of these stories are now transcripts and have become works of literature. We will explore both the complementary aspects of this development, and areas of tension.nnnDuring the course each student will embark on a project that demonstrates a thorough understanding of the topics covered, and utilizes those elements in their wider practice of writing and rhetoric. nnnThe project will be to research a story handed down within the family - an adventure of some distant relative, or a family migration from one country to another. Factoring in elements from the taught class, the student will mythologize the story: by writing an in depth commentary on its implications - factoring in contemporary, psychological and metaphorical associations. The second element will be to tell the story to the class. In these way we experience myth as a living principle, not something just from `a long time ago.¿
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

PWR 91EP: Intermediate Writing: Communicating Climate Change: Navigating the Stories from the Frontlines (EARTHSYS 154)

In the next two decades floods, droughts and famine caused by climate change will displace more than 250 million people around the world. In this course students will develop an increased understanding of how different stakeholders including scientists, aid organizations, locals, policy makers, activists, and media professionals communicate the climate change crisis. They will select a site experiencing the devastating effects and research the voices telling the stories of those sites and the audiences who are (or are not) listening. Students might want to investigate drought-ridden areas such as the Central Valley of California or Darfur, Sudan; Alpine glaciers melting in the Alps or in Alaska; the increasingly flooded Pacific islands; the hurricane ravaged Gulf Coast, among many others. Data from various stakeholders will be analyzed and synthesized for a magazine length article designed to bring attention to a region and/or issue that has previously been neglected. Students will wri more »
In the next two decades floods, droughts and famine caused by climate change will displace more than 250 million people around the world. In this course students will develop an increased understanding of how different stakeholders including scientists, aid organizations, locals, policy makers, activists, and media professionals communicate the climate change crisis. They will select a site experiencing the devastating effects and research the voices telling the stories of those sites and the audiences who are (or are not) listening. Students might want to investigate drought-ridden areas such as the Central Valley of California or Darfur, Sudan; Alpine glaciers melting in the Alps or in Alaska; the increasingly flooded Pacific islands; the hurricane ravaged Gulf Coast, among many others. Data from various stakeholders will be analyzed and synthesized for a magazine length article designed to bring attention to a region and/or issue that has previously been neglected. Students will write and submit their article for publication.nnFor students who have completed the first two levels of the writing requirement and want further work in developing writing abilities, especially within discipline-specific contexts and nonfiction genres. Individual conferences with instructor and peer workshops. Prerequisite: first two levels of the writing requirement or equivalent transfer credit. For more information, see https://undergrad.stanford.edu/programs/pwr/explore/notation-science-writing.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

PWR 91F: Finding Your Story

Life challenges us to become aware of the stories that shape us--family stories, cultural mythologies, even popular movies, television shows, and songs--and then create and live our own story. We face this challenge throughout our lives but perhaps most acutely as we move into adulthood; this is the period when we most need to become conscious of stories and their power, to gather wisdom, practices, and resources for finding our own story. This class, designed with seniors in mind, will illuminate and explore these resources and give you the opportunity to reflect deeply, in discussion and writing, on what truly calls to you in this life. We will engage with some of the world's great stories--myths, parables, teaching tales, modern fiction, even aphorisms, koans, and riddles. In them we can find both elements that resonate with our own story and provocations that help us unearth and cultivate our native gifts--the genius in each of us. We will look at short excerpts from masterworks an more »
Life challenges us to become aware of the stories that shape us--family stories, cultural mythologies, even popular movies, television shows, and songs--and then create and live our own story. We face this challenge throughout our lives but perhaps most acutely as we move into adulthood; this is the period when we most need to become conscious of stories and their power, to gather wisdom, practices, and resources for finding our own story. This class, designed with seniors in mind, will illuminate and explore these resources and give you the opportunity to reflect deeply, in discussion and writing, on what truly calls to you in this life. We will engage with some of the world's great stories--myths, parables, teaching tales, modern fiction, even aphorisms, koans, and riddles. In them we can find both elements that resonate with our own story and provocations that help us unearth and cultivate our native gifts--the genius in each of us. We will look at short excerpts from masterworks and myths from around the world, all voices in the largest conversation we have as humans, the one that asks: who am I? why am I here? what truly matters? how can I be happy? Together we will investigate how these stories, and stories like them, can be used to help us find our own story. Students in this course will have a special opportunity to meet personally with poet Billy Collins and singer Aimee Mann when they visit campus in April. Does not fulfill NSC requirement. For students who have completed the first level of the writing requirement and want further work in developing writing abilities, especially within discipline-specific contexts and nonfiction genres. Individual conferences with instructor and peer workshops. Prerequisite: first level of the writing requirement or equivalent transfer credit. For more information, see http://www.stanford.edu/dept/undergrad/cgi-bin/drupal_pwr/advanced_pwr.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

PWR 91KS: Intermediate Writing: Design Thinking and Science Communication

Effective communication of expert knowledge in the sciences to non-specialist audiences. Project-based work on a range and variety of communication challenges, contexts, and media. For students who have completed the first two levels of the writing requirement and want further work in developing writing abilities, especially within discipline-specific contexts and nonfiction genres. Individual conferences with instructor and peer workshops. Prerequisite: first two levels of the writing requirement or equivalent transfer credit. For more information, see https://undergrad.stanford.edu/programs/pwr/explore/notation-science-writing.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
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