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APPPHYS 100: The Questions of Clay: Craft, Creativity and Scientific Process

Students will create individual studio portfolios of ceramic work and pursue technical investigations of clay properties and the firing process using modern scientific equipment. Emphasis on development of creative process; parallels between science and traditional craft; integration of creative expression with scientific method and analysis. Prior ceramics experience desirable but not necessary. Limited enrollment. Prerequisites: any level of background in physics, Instructor permission.
Terms: Win, alternate years, not given next year | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Mabuchi, H. (PI)

ARCHLGY 106A: Museums and Collections (ARCHLGY 306A)

Practical, theoretical, and ethical issues which face museums and collections. Practical collections-based work, museum visits, and display research. The roles of the museum in contemporary society. Students develop their own exhibition and engage with the issues surrounding the preservation of material culture.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-CE | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ARCHLGY 134: Museum Cultures: Material Representation in the Past and Present (AMSTUD 134, ARCHLGY 234, ARTHIST 284B, CSRE 134, EDUC 214, NATIVEAM 134)

Students will open the "black box" of museums to consider the past and present roles of institutional collections, culminating in a student-curated exhibition. Today, museums assert their relevance as dynamic spaces for debate and learning. Colonialism and restitution, the politics of representation, human/object relationships, and changing frameworks of authority make museum work widely significant and consistently challenging. Through thinking-in-practice, this course reflexively explores "museum cultures": representations of self and other within museums and institutional cultures of the museum world itself.n3 credits (no final project) or 5 credits (final project). May be repeat for credit
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-CE | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ARTHIST 105B: Medieval Journeys: Introduction through the Art and Architecture (ARTHIST 305B, DLCL 123)

The course explores the experience and imagination of medieval journeys through an interdisciplinary, cross-cultural, and skills-based approaches. As a foundations class, this survey of medieval culture engages in particular the art and architecture of the period. The Middle Ages is presented as a network of global economies, fueled by a desire for natural resources, access to luxury goods and holy sites. We will study a large geographical area encompassing the British Isles, Europe, the Mediterranean, Central Asia, India, and East Africa and trace the connectivity of these lands in economic, political, religious, and artistic terms from the fourth to the fourteenth century C.E. The students will have two lectures and one discussion session per week. Depending on the size of the class, it is possible that a graduate student TA will run the discussion session. Our goal is to give a skills-oriented approach to the Middle Ages and to engage students in creative projects that will satisfy 1. Ways-Creative Expression requirement as well as one of the following two: Ways-Analytical Interpretive or Ways-Engaging Difference.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-CE, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ARTSTUDI 18AX: Digital & Black and White Photography

For students interested in the history and contemporary practice of portrait photography. At a time when pictures are being produced and disseminated in unprecedented proliferation, and the 'selfie' has become a key part of popular photographic discourse, we will look at the complexities of portraiture in terms of skill sets and processes, aesthetics and styles, ideology and identity. The course is a hybrid of black & white and digital photography, and will engage with such dualities as private/public, professional/amateur and traditional/innovative in the pursuit of capturing the self through the looking glass, beyond pose and persona. Assignments will include working individually and collaboratively with black & white film as well as digital equipment, experimenting with different lights and lighting techniques, and research into resources ranging from personal family portraits to the Cantor Museum archives.
Terms: Sum | Units: 2 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: Calm, J. (PI)

ARTSTUDI 130: Interactive Art: Making it with Arduino (ARTSTUDI 231A)

Students use electronics and software to create kinetic and interactive elements in artwork. No prior knowledge of electronics or software is required. Students learn to program the Arduino, a small easy-to-use microprocessor control unit ( see http://www.arduino.cc/ ). Learn to connect various sensors such as light, motion, sound and touch and use them to control software. Learn to interface actuators like motors, lights and solenoids to create movement. Learn to connect the Arduino to theMAX/MSP/Jitter programming environment to create media-intensive video and audio environments. Explore the social dimensions of electronic art. (lower level)
Terms: not given this year | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ARTSTUDI 131: Sound Art I (MUSIC 154A)

Acoustic, digital and analog approaches to sound art. Familiarization with techniques of listening, recording, digital processing and production. Required listening and readings in the history and contemporary practice of sound art. (lower level)
Terms: not given this year | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-CE | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ARTSTUDI 139: Portraiture and Facial Anatomy for Artists (SURG 241)

Focus is on the art of portraiture and underlying structures of the face, fundamental anatomical elements such as the skull and muscles of facial expressions, and the intersections between human anatomy and art. Studio sessions incorporate plastic models, dry bones, cadaveric specimens, and live models. Encourages use of proper anatomical terminology for describing structures and their relationships.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)

ARTSTUDI 140: Drawing I

Functional anatomy and perspective as they apply to problems of drawing the form in space. Individual and group instruction as students work from still life set-ups, nature, and the model. Emphasis is on the development of critical skills and perceptual drawing techniques for those with little or no previous experience with pastels, inks, charcoal, conte, and pencil. Lectures alternate with studio work. (lower level)
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ARTSTUDI 141: Plein Air Painting Now

Surrounded by so many technologies for image production, why choose to take a course based on a style of painting developed over a hundred years ago? The standard answer to this question has changed remarkably little. Rather than answering that the camera cannot capture what the eye sees, we might instead respond that neither the computer, nor the camera, nor video, can reproduce in paint the subjective gaze of the contemporary viewer. Contained within this answer lies the trajectory for the class "PLEIN AIR PAINTING NOW!"nnIn this course students will be introduced to various water based media appropriate for plein air painting and learn various techniques and strategies for making paintings outdoors. The course will include the traditional discussions of brushes, paints, the different types of supports as well as easels, umbrellas and chairs. A broad variety of painting techniques will be demonstrated. We will set up in various locations around campus, paying particular attention to more »
Surrounded by so many technologies for image production, why choose to take a course based on a style of painting developed over a hundred years ago? The standard answer to this question has changed remarkably little. Rather than answering that the camera cannot capture what the eye sees, we might instead respond that neither the computer, nor the camera, nor video, can reproduce in paint the subjective gaze of the contemporary viewer. Contained within this answer lies the trajectory for the class "PLEIN AIR PAINTING NOW!"nnIn this course students will be introduced to various water based media appropriate for plein air painting and learn various techniques and strategies for making paintings outdoors. The course will include the traditional discussions of brushes, paints, the different types of supports as well as easels, umbrellas and chairs. A broad variety of painting techniques will be demonstrated. We will set up in various locations around campus, paying particular attention to the specifics of the siteas this will serve as the jumping off point for discussion of the readings that form the second component of the class.nnPlease note that this class takes place outdoors. Plan accordingly, as we will be meeting in various locations around campus, and will be subject to inclement weather.Freshmen and Sophomores receive priority for enrollment. This is a designated CREATIVE EXPRESSIONS course.
Terms: Aut, Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Deas, Y. (PI)
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