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1 - 10 of 39 results for: VPGE::Career ; Currently searching offered courses. You can also include unoffered courses

CEE 227: Global Project Finance

Public and private sources of finance for large, complex, capital-intensive projects in developed and developing countries. Benefits and disadvantages, major participants, risk sharing, and challenges of project finance in emerging markets. Financial, economic, political, cultural, and technological elements that affect project structures, processes, and outcomes. Case studies. Limited enrollment.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Bennon, M. (PI)

CEE 275K: The Practice of Environmental Consulting

Class consists of eight interactive two-hour seminars with discussions, and will cover the evolution of the environmental consulting business, strategic choices and alternative business models for private and public firms, a review of the key operational issues in managing firm, organizational strategies, knowledge management and innovation, and ethical issues in providing professional services. Case studies will be used to illustrate key concepts. Selected reading materials drawn from the technical and business literature on the consulting business. Student groups will prepare and present an abbreviated business plan for an environmental based business. Enrollment limited to CEE MS and PHD students.
Terms: Win | Units: 2 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

CHEMENG 296: Creating New Ventures in Engineering and Science-based Industries (CHEM 196, CHEM 296, CHEMENG 196)

Open to seniors and graduate students interested in the creation of new ventures and entrepreneurship in engineering and science intensive industries such as chemical, energy, materials, bioengineering, environmental, clean-tech, pharmaceuticals, medical, and biotechnology. Exploration of the dynamics, complexity, and challenges that define creating new ventures, particularly in industries that require long development times, large investments, integration across a wide range of technical and non-technical disciplines, and the creation and protection of intellectual property. Covers business basics, opportunity viability, creating start-ups, entrepreneurial leadership, and entrepreneurship as a career. Teaching methods include lectures, case studies, guest speakers, and individual and team projects.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

CHEMENG 410: Public Communication of Research

Develop skills for communicating complex science to the public through writing, video, and public speaking. Learn how to work with the media to explain scientific discoveries without overselling the science. Work in small groups and one-on-one with writers and guest speaker; develop a short written piece and video explaining own research; develop skills that will translate to future scientific projects. Open to graduate students in the biosciences, chemistry, and engineering. Enrollment limited to 20.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: Khosla, C. (PI)

COMM 282: Social Media Issues (COMM 182)

(Graduate students register for COMM 282.) Students will take away from this course a set of conceptual tools, a vocabulary, and an analytical framework with which to recognize, understand, and more effectively manage new social practices online, together with a familiarity with the literature regarding social media and identity, community, collective action, public sphere, social capital, networks, and social networks. Students will also develop skills at using online forums, blogs, microblogs, wikis for research, collaboration, and communication. Limited enrollment. Prerequisite: instructor consent. Please see http://comm.stanford.edu/faculty-rheingold/ for application instructions. Contact instructor at: howard@rheingold.com
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

COMM 277C: Specialized Writing and Reporting: Environmental Journalism (COMM 177C, EARTHSYS 177C, EARTHSYS 277C, ENVRES 277C)

(Graduate students register for COMM / ENVRES 277C.) Practical, collaborative, writing-intensive course in science-based environmental journalism. Science and journalism students learn how to identify and write engaging stories about environmental issues and science, how to assess the quality and relevance of environmental news, how to cover the environment and science beats effectively, and how to build bridges between the worlds of journalism and science. Limited enrollment: preference to journalism students and students in the natural and environmental sciences. Prerequisite: COMM 104, ENVRES 200 or consent of instructor. Admissions by application only, available from thayden@stanford.edu.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Hayden, T. (PI)

CS 183B: How to Start a Startup

The course is designed to be a one-class practical MBA equivalent for engineers that want to start startups. We'll try to cover everything younneed to know other than how to build a product. Topics include: having ideas, getting users, company culture, fundraising, hiring, operations,nmanagements, and more. The format of the class will be guest lectures from experts in each subject. The class will focus more on practical advice than theory, although many speakers will also tell personal stories.
Terms: Aut | Units: 2 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: Altman, S. (PI)

CTL 221: Practicum for fellows in the Stanford-SJSU Preparing Future Professors Program

Nine weekly one-hour sessions consisting of discussions of: (1) the previous week's SJSU shadowing experiences and (2) readings related to session themes.
Terms: Win | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: Reis, R. (PI)

CTL 231: Preparing for Faculty Careers

For graduate students from all disciplines who are considering a faculty career of any type and at any of a broad range of institutions. Postdoctoral fellows may audit by consent of instructor. Begins with a methodology to help determine if a faculty career is a good fit for the values, interests and abilities of each participant. Progresses to an exploration of different types of faculty roles and different institutional contexts (e.g., tenure-track vs. non-tenure-track; research-intensive vs. teaching-intensive; large vs. small; etc.). Discusses how to identify and land a faculty position. Ends with concrete tips on how to thrive in such a role. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

DLCL 303: Language Program Management

Administrative Internship in Language Program Management. Experiences can include, but are not limited to, the following: Shadow faculty and staff in select areas of administration and supervision within the Language Center and DLCL; Placement testing and student advisement; Technology in teaching and learning; Processes for teacher observation and feedback; Procedures in staff supervision and Human Resources; Course scheduling, budgeting, staffing, and searches; Interface with external programs (e.g. BOSP, Bechtel, CTL).
Terms: Win, Sum | Units: 1-3 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
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