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11 - 20 of 26 results for: VPGE::Career ; Currently searching offered courses. You can also include unoffered courses

EFSLANG 694: English for Business, Industry and Professional Life

For advanced graduate students. Task-based practice of language appropriate for professional settings in industry and related teamwork. Simulation of the roles of manager, applicant, subordinate, and coworker. Prerequisite: EFSLANG 693A, or consent of instructor. Enrollment limited to 14.
Terms: Win | Units: 1-3 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: Rylance, C. (PI)

ENGR 311A: Women's Perspectives

Master's and Ph.D. seminar series driven by student interests. Possible topics: time management, career choices, health and family, diversity, professional development, and personal values. Guest speakers from academia and industry, student presentations with an emphasis on group discussion. Graduate students share experiences and examine scientific research in these areas. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Win | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: Sheppard, S. (PI)

ENGR 311B: Designing the Professional

Once I get my degree, how do I get a life? What do you want out of life after Stanford? Wondering how to weave together what fits, is doable, and will be truly meaningful? Join us for Designing the Professional. This course applies the innovation principles of design thinking to the "wicked problem" of designing your life and vocation in and beyond Stanford. We'll approach these lifelong questions with a structured framework set in a seminar where you can work out your ideas in conversation with your peers. Seminar open to all graduate students (PhD, Masters) and Postdocs in all 7 schools.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

FINANCE 385: Angel and Venture Capital Financing for Entrepreneurs and Investors

This course covers all the stages of funding for early stage high-growth companies, from seed funding to venture capital rounds to a successful exit. We will concentrate on how entrepreneurs and investors make and should make important decisions. Examples of issues that we will cover are: How can entrepreneurs raise funding successfully? What are typical mistakes entrepreneurs make in raising capital and negotiating with investors? How to choose your investor? How to pitch to an investor? How do angels and VCs generate and process their deal flow and select companies? How are VCs involved in business decisions such as recruiting talent and replacing CEOs? What are the important provisions of financial contracts between VCs and founders? How to value early-stage companies? The course is very applied and mostly case-based. We will discuss a lot of nitty-gritty details that is a must for founders and investors. Case protagonists, founders, angels, and VCs will be among guest speakers. No prior knowledge of the VC industry is needed.
Units: 3 | Grading: GSB Letter Graded

GSBGEN 533: Technology Licensing

Licensing of technology and its corresponding intellectual property is big business, and integral to the business plans and competitive strategies of start-ups and Fortune 500 companies alike. Although the annual dollar magnitude of licenses of patents and other technology-related IP is difficult to estimate due to the proprietary nature of much of the data, academic studies peg the U.S. IP licensing market at ~$66B, and the global market at ~$180B. The development and evolution of technology standards and interoperability requirements, regulatory overlays that require technologies outside a company's core competencies, the proliferation and widespread enforcement of patents, the rapid expansion of IP-based business models, and the staggering expense and uncertain benefits of internal R&D, among other things, have combined to weigh heavily on the buy side of the make/buy scale, and to amplify the importance of inbound and outbound licensing arrangements for both start-up and Fortune 50 more »
Licensing of technology and its corresponding intellectual property is big business, and integral to the business plans and competitive strategies of start-ups and Fortune 500 companies alike. Although the annual dollar magnitude of licenses of patents and other technology-related IP is difficult to estimate due to the proprietary nature of much of the data, academic studies peg the U.S. IP licensing market at ~$66B, and the global market at ~$180B. The development and evolution of technology standards and interoperability requirements, regulatory overlays that require technologies outside a company's core competencies, the proliferation and widespread enforcement of patents, the rapid expansion of IP-based business models, and the staggering expense and uncertain benefits of internal R&D, among other things, have combined to weigh heavily on the buy side of the make/buy scale, and to amplify the importance of inbound and outbound licensing arrangements for both start-up and Fortune 500 companies.nBecause licenses are complex legal agreements with important legal consequences, it is tempting for business executives to delegate to lawyers the negotiation of the non-economic terms of their companies' technology license agreements. The problem with such an approach, however, is that so-called "non-economic" terms can have significant and occasionally mortal economic and business consequences. While no business person should grapple with such issues in the context of a large or complex license agreement without legal counsel, it is critical that the business person understand the consequences and negotiating levers and trade-offs themselves, for at their core, the decisions to be made on these issues are business decisions, not legal ones.nThis course is organized around two hypothetical companies seeking to negotiate a technology license agreement. Both parties operate under a common set of "public"€ facts, and each responds as well to "private"€ facts relevant to various business priorities and issues. Students are divided into three-person teams, each representing one or the other of the hypothetical companies, and collaborate over multiple sessions to develop a strategic business approach and then to negotiate a licensing agreement. Lectures are focused on the business, and to a lesser extent, legal issues arising in complex licensing arrangements, and are designed to give students the context and perspective they need to participate effectively in licensing strategy development and negotiation. n By immersing teams of business students in a multi-session licensing negotiation, it is the objective of this course to enable them to better understand and think critically about the principal issues that arise in the conceptualization and negotiation of technology license agreements.
Units: 2 | Grading: GSB Letter Graded

HRP 271: Preparation and Practice: Scientific Communication and Media

Through tailored lecture, case study, and a practical final project, academic and professional leaders will help you gain insight into the science communications and media industry and the skills necessary to succeed within the various positions and levels available within it.nnAnticipated Learning Outcomes ¿nTo assist interdisciplinary graduate students, medical students, residents and fellows in all levels of training to develop and hone the communication skills necessary for post-training and internship success in a science communications/media field;nTo provide an understanding of the scope of career opportunities within the science communications sector, focusing on the development, organization, and management issues specific to it;nTo provide a forum for interacting with alumni, faculty, and other practitioners from a variety of fields and organizations who may assist candidates with defining and meeting their own professional goals;nTo increase awareness of industry terminology more »
Through tailored lecture, case study, and a practical final project, academic and professional leaders will help you gain insight into the science communications and media industry and the skills necessary to succeed within the various positions and levels available within it.nnAnticipated Learning Outcomes ¿nTo assist interdisciplinary graduate students, medical students, residents and fellows in all levels of training to develop and hone the communication skills necessary for post-training and internship success in a science communications/media field;nTo provide an understanding of the scope of career opportunities within the science communications sector, focusing on the development, organization, and management issues specific to it;nTo provide a forum for interacting with alumni, faculty, and other practitioners from a variety of fields and organizations who may assist candidates with defining and meeting their own professional goals;nTo increase awareness of industry terminology and theories, combined with hands-on experience with techniques and methodologies most useful for credential development on the job market;nTo develop and hone expertise in the areas of: publishing, editing, workflow, ethics, trends, principles of effective scholarly/news writing, interviewing techniques, and media/website management.
Terms: Sum | Units: 1-2 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)
Instructors: Eberle, S. (PI)

INDE 230: Topics in Scientific Management

Designed for postdocs and advanced graduate students. Reviews management skills necessary for successfully assuming leadership roles in scientific research. Addresses some of the most difficult aspects of developing, directing, and managing people and projects and running a research group, especially issues that new faculty have traditionally learned by trial and error over a number of years. Topics include: the faculty job search process and strategies, key elements in starting a lab, basic principles regarding legal dimensions of scientific activity (intellectual property, royalties, links with industry), team science, research ethics, communication and negotiation skills, and writing and securing grants.
Terms: Win | Units: 1 | Grading: Medical Satisfactory/No Credit

LAWGEN 115N: Human Rights Advocacy

What are the origins of the human rights movement and where is it headed? What does it mean to be a human rights activist? What are the main challenges and dilemmas facing those engaged in human rights advocacy? In the space of seven decades, human rights advocates have transformed a marginal utopian ideal into a central element of global discussion, if not practice. In this seminar we will examine the actors and organizations behind this remarkable development as well as the vast challenges faced by advocates in the recent past and today. Together, we will learn to be critical of, as well as to think, and act, like human rights advocates. This seminar will introduce you to some the main debates and dilemmas within the human rights movement. We will consider and understand the differing agendas of western international nongovernmental organizations (INGOs) and their counterparts in the frequently non-western) developing world, as well as tensions between and among rights advocates alon more »
What are the origins of the human rights movement and where is it headed? What does it mean to be a human rights activist? What are the main challenges and dilemmas facing those engaged in human rights advocacy? In the space of seven decades, human rights advocates have transformed a marginal utopian ideal into a central element of global discussion, if not practice. In this seminar we will examine the actors and organizations behind this remarkable development as well as the vast challenges faced by advocates in the recent past and today. Together, we will learn to be critical of, as well as to think, and act, like human rights advocates. This seminar will introduce you to some the main debates and dilemmas within the human rights movement. We will consider and understand the differing agendas of western international nongovernmental organizations (INGOs) and their counterparts in the frequently non-western) developing world, as well as tensions between and among rights advocates along other important dimensions (civil and political vs. economic, social and cultural rights; rights promotion through engagement of powerful actors vs. challenging structures of power, etc.). The seminar seeks to develop your ability: 1) to understand human rights and social justice issues as contested political, legal and cultural phenomena; 2) to review advocacy texts, videos and other interventions critically; 3) to appreciate the political dimensions of efforts to promote human rights; 4) to understand how recent history constrains and structures options and possibilities for social intervention to promote rights and justice. During the course of the quarter you will be required to submit several short reflection papers and develop a human rights advocacy campaign.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ME 315: The Designer in Society

This class focuses on individuals and their psychological well being. The class delves into how students perceive themselves and their work, and how they might use design thinking to lead a more creative and committed life. As a participant you read parts of a different book each week and then engage in exercises designed to unlock learnings. In addition, there are two self-selected term project dealing with either eliminating a problem from your life or doing something you have never done before. Apply the first day during class. Attendance at first session is mandatory; otherwise, at most one absence is acceptable.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

MS&E 271: Global Entrepreneurial Marketing

Skills needed to market new technology-based products to customers around the world. Case method discussions. Cases include startups and global high tech firms. Course themes: marketing toolkit, targeting markets and customers, product marketing and management, partners and distribution, sales and negotiation, and outbound marketing. Team-based take-home final exam. Limited enrollment.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-4 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
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