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531 - 540 of 859 results for: all courses

ILAC 241: Fiction Workshop in Spanish

Spanish and Spanish American short stories approached through narrative theory and craft. Assignments are creative in nature and focus on the formal elements of fiction (e.g. character and plot development, point of view, creating a scene, etc.). Students will write, workshop, and revise an original short story throughout the term. No previous experience with creative writing is required. Readings may include works by Ayala, Bolaño, Borges, Clarín, Cortázar, García Márquez, Piglia, Rodoreda, and others. Enrollment limited.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-CE | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ILAC 246: Critical Issues of Human Rights through Literature

This course seeks to explain some of the most relevant contemporary problems of contemporary human rights through the eyes of literature. Through novels, the course problematizes some issues of human rights that, from a legal perspective, are simplified or captured merely through legal forms i.e. rules. These novels highlight the social and political tensions involved in the rise of human rights and in some of its most urgent problems during their short history. Human rights legal forms generally simplify a wider array of tensions that this course brings to the foreground. Taught in Spanish. INSTRUCTOR: Jorge González-Jacome.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ILAC 263: Visions of the Andes (ILAC 363)

What visions of the Andes circulate in Latin American literature, photography and painting? How are they constructed? How is their value accrued? The course focuses on visual and written images of Andean landscapes. Beginning with 19th century technical photography, the course explores the visual economy of the Andes in representative texts and images from Peru, Bolivia and Chile, vis-à-vis critical discourses about Andean culture. In Spanish.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ILAC 277: Spanish and Society: Cultures of Salsa

Salsa is the soundscape of 20th century Latin America. How is it possible that salsa stands for Latin American music? How can we understand its origin and its musical expansion? We learn how salsa voices transformation and self-exploration of different places and moments in all of Latin America and the US and we analyze how it travels across the world. We discuss musical examples in relation to colonialism, globalization, migration, nationalism, gender and ethnicity. As a core course of the Spanish major, Cultures of Salsa emphasizes the analysis of Spanish in real-world contexts.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Briceno, X. (PI)

ILAC 278: Senior Seminar: Spanish Poetry

Open to seniors in ILAC and Spanish: others by permission of instructor. nnThis course will study the poetry of Lorca and his generation, the so-called Generation of 1927. We will concentrate on the rediscovery of the poetry of Luis de Góngora and its impact in revolutionizing poetic language in modern Spain. Special attention will be given to close stylistic analysis and to the historical and social conditions out of which arose the progressive intellectual and educational movement that gave rise to this renaissance of brilliant poetry. Taught in Spanish.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ILAC 278A: Senior Seminar: Literatura y Antropología

Literature and Anthropology in Latin America (including Brazil. Amerindian perspectivism and the poetics of translation.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ILAC 280: Latin@ Literature (CHILATST 200, CSRE 200, ILAC 382)

Examines a diverse set of narratives by U.S. Latin@s of Mexican, Puerto Rican, Cuban, Guatemalan, and Dominican heritage through the lens of latinidad. All share the historical experience of Spanish colonization and U.S. imperialism, yet their im/migration patterns differ, affecting social, cultural, and political trajectories in the US and relationships to "home" and "homeland," nation, diaspora, history, and memory. Explores how racialization informs genders as well as sexualities. Emphasis on textual analysis. Taught in English.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ITALIAN 41N: Imagining Italy

Images of Italy. To the English and American literary imagination, Italy has long been a source of fascination. During the past hundred years, writers from Nathaniel Hawthorne to Frances Mayes have explored the broad range of contradictory resonances of the Italian setting, in fiction, travel essays, and memoirs. While some writers have celebrated the sensuality of Italian culture and landscape, others have imagined Italy as a more dangerous place -- as dangerous as the erotic love with which it is often identified. In this course we will examine the range of literary responses to Italy by writers in English during the past hundred years, and explore the ways in which our culture has continued to construct myths of Italy. We will also see how these myths have been transformed into commodities in today's consumer culture, making "Italy" one of the most profitable fictions in the marketplace.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ITALIAN 75N: Narrative Medicine and Near-Death Experiences (FRENCH 75N)

Even if many of us don't fully believe in an afterlife, we remain fascinated by visions of it. This course focuses on Near-Death Experiences and the stories around them, investigating them from the many perspectives pertinent to the growing field of narrative medicine: medical, neurological, cognitive, psychological, sociological, literary, and filmic. The goal is not to understand whether the stories are veridical but what they do for us, as individuals, and as a culture, and in particular how they seek to reshape the patient-doctor relationship. Materials will span the 20th century and come into the present. Taught in English.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Wittman, L. (PI)

ITALIAN 100: Masterpieces: Dante

An exploration of Dante's "Inferno" (the first of the three canticles of The Divine Comedy). The aim is to learn how to read the poem in detail and in depth, through both slow reading and ongoing reconstruction of Dante's world. We will also ask to what extent Dante's civic identity as a Florentine, especially his exile from Florence, gave momentum to his literary career and helped him become the author of one of the masterpieces of Western literature. Special emphasis is placed on Dante's ethical world view and his representation of character. Taught in English.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
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