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101 - 110 of 215 results for: CS

CS 109L: Statistical Computing with R Laboratory

Supplemental lab to CS109. Introduces the R programming language for statistical computing. Topics include basic facilities of R including mathematical, graphical, and probability functions, building simulations, introductory data fitting and machine learning. Provides exposure to the functional programming paradigm. Corequisite: CS109.
Terms: Aut, Spr | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

CS 140: Operating Systems and Systems Programming

Operating systems design and implementation. Basic structure; synchronization and communication mechanisms; implementation of processes, process management, scheduling, and protection; memory organization and management, including virtual memory; I/O device management, secondary storage, and file systems. Prerequisite: CS 110.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Mazieres, D. (PI)

CS 142: Web Applications

Concepts and techniques used in constructing interactive web applications. Browser-side web facilities such as HTML, cascading stylesheets, javascript, and the document object model. Server-side technologies such as sessions, templates, relational databases, and object-relational mapping. Issues in web security and application scalability. New models of web application deployment. Prerequisites: CS 107 and CS 108.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

CS 144: Introduction to Computer Networking

Principles and practice. Structure and components of computer networks, packet switching, layered architectures. Applications: web/http, voice-over-IP, p2p file sharing and socket programming. Reliable transport: TCP/IP, reliable transfer, flow control, and congestion control. The network layer: names and addresses, routing. Local area networks: ethernet and switches. Wireless networks and network security. Prerequisite: CS 110.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

CS 155: Computer and Network Security (EE 287A)

For seniors and first-year graduate students. Principles of computer systems security. Attack techniques and how to defend against them. Topics include: network attacks and defenses, operating system security, application security (web, apps, databases), malware, privacy, and security for mobile devices. Course projects focus on building reliable code. Prerequisite: 110. Recommended: basic Unix.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

CS 164: Computing with Physical Objects: Algorithms for Shape and Motion

Algorithms and data structures dealing with the representation and manipulation of physical objects and entities in the computer. Computational structures for shape and motion, shape fitting and matching, triangulations and other spatial subdivisions, and low-dimensional search and optimization. Examples relevant to computer graphics, computer vision, robotics and geometric computation emphasizing algorithmic paradigms applicable to multidimensional data. Prerequisites: CS 103 or 103B, and CS 109 or STATS 116, and CS 106B/X or consent of instructor.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

CS 168: The Modern Algorithmic Toolbox

This course will provide a rigorous and hands-on introduction to the central ideas and algorithms that constitute the core of the modern algorithmsntoolkit. Emphasis will be on understanding the high-level theoretical intuitions and principles underlying the algorithms we discuss, as well asndeveloping a concrete understanding of when and how to implement and apply the algorithms. The course will be structured as a sequence of one-week investigations; each week will introduce one algorithmic idea, and discuss the motivation, theoretical underpinning, and practical applications of that algorithmic idea. Each topic will be accompanied by a mini-project in which students will be guided through a practical application of the ideas of the week. Topics include hashing, dimension reduction and LSH, boosting, linear programming, gradient descent, sampling, and basic data representation and coding. Prerequisites: CS107 and CS161, or permission from the instructor.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

CS 173: A Computational Tour of the Human Genome

(Only one of 173 or 273A counts toward any CS degree program.) Introduction to computational biology through an informatic exploration of the human genome. Topics include: genome sequencing; functional landscape of the human genome (genes, gene regulation, repeats, RNA genes, epigenetics); genome evolution (comparative genomics, ultraconservation, co-option). Additional topics may include population genetics, personalized genomics, and ancient DNA. Course includes primers on molecular biology, the UCSC Genome Browser, and text processing languages. Guest lectures on current genomic research topics. Class will be similar in spirit to CS273A, which will not be offered this year. Prerequisites: CS107 or equivalent background in programming.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

CS 183B: How to Start a Startup

The course is designed to be a one-class practical MBA equivalent for engineers that want to start startups. We'll try to cover everything younneed to know other than how to build a product. Topics include: having ideas, getting users, company culture, fundraising, hiring, operations,nmanagements, and more. The format of the class will be guest lectures from experts in each subject. The class will focus more on practical advice than theory, although many speakers will also tell personal stories.
Terms: Aut | Units: 2 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: Altman, S. (PI)

CS 193A: Android Programming

Introduction to building applications for Android platform. Examines key concepts of Android programming: tool chain, application life-cycle, views, controls, intents, designing mobile UIs, networking, threading, and more. Features ten weekly lectures and a series of small programming projects. Phone not required, but a phone makes the projects more engaging. Prerequisites: 106B or Java experience at 106B level.
Terms: Win | Units: 1 | Grading: Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Stepp, M. (PI)
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