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1 - 10 of 212 results for: TAPS

TAPS 1: Introduction to Theater and Performance Studies

What brings together a contemporary company such as Google and an experimental theater such as The Wooster Group? What sets them apart? Approaching theater as presentational form of organization, this class shifts study of theater from the context of literature to that of performance. It offers an overview of performance across disciplines: from theater and other performing arts, to law, management, sports, and new technologies. In this interdisciplinary exploration, performance emerges as a model that cuts across diverse branches of contemporary culture, from sports events, to social dances, to political protests, to the organization of a workplace. It is designed to serve students who may go on to major or minor in Theater and Performance Studies including the Dance division and also students for whom this knowledge is a general contribution to their liberal arts education or to their own field of study. It integrates scholarly research and practical use of performance. No previous performing arts training or skills are required.
Terms: Win, Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

TAPS 11N: Dramatic Tensions: Theater and the Marketplace

Preference to freshmen. The current state of the American theater and its artists. Conventional wisdom says that theater is a dying art, and a lost cause, especially in an age of multi-media entertainment. But there are more young playwrights, actors, and directors entering the field today than at any other time in American history. Focus is on the work of today's theater artists, with an emphasis on an emerging generation of playwrights. Students read a cross-section of plays from writers currently working in the US and UK, covering a spectrum of subjects and styles from serious to comic, from the musical to the straight play. Hits and misses from recent seasons of the New York and London stages and some of the differences of artistic taste across the Atlantic. Hands-on exploration of the arts and skills necessary to make a play succeed. Students develop their own areas of interest, in guided projects in design, direction or performance. Conversations with playwrights, designers ,and directors. Labs and master classes to solve problems posed in areas of creative production. Class meets literary managers and producers who are on the frontlines of underwriting new talent. Class trips include two plays at major Bay Area Stages.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Freed, A. (PI)

TAPS 12N: To Die For: Antigone and Political Dissent (CLASSICS 17N)

(Formerly CLASSGEN 6N.) Preference to freshmen. Tensions inherent in the democracy of ancient Athens; how the character of Antigone emerges in later drama, film, and political thought as a figure of resistance against illegitimate authority; and her relevance to contemporary struggles for women's and workers' rights and national liberation. Readings and screenings include versions of Antigone by Sophocles, Anouilh, Brecht, Fugard/Kani/Ntshona, Paulin, Glowacki, Gurney, and von Trotta.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-Gender, WAY-ED, WAY-ER | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Rehm, R. (PI)

TAPS 13N: Law and Drama

Preference to Freshmen.Beyond the obvious traits that make a good (court room) drama, theater and jurisprudence have much more in common. Just as drama is engaged not only in entertainment but also in examination of social conventions and mechanisms, so law is not only concerned with dispensing justice but with shaping and maintaining a viable human community. In this class we will read and discuss a series of plays in which court proceedings are at the center of dramatic action and concluding with an investigation of the new genre of documentary drama.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-ER | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

TAPS 14AX: Musical Theatre Bootcamp

Spend three weeks in the world of musical theatre with guest artist instructors currently working in the industry. Learn the history of the craft through music, dance, and acting, with all training driven towards the specificity of musical theatre. Week one will be the pre-golden and golden age of musical theatre, week 2 will be spent in the 60s-90s, and the 3rd week will be 2000-the present (and maybe some tastes of musicals just now in development!). With a director/choreographer and a music director, songs/scenes will be worked on as appropriate for each week along with basic dance moves that support each era of the musical theatre canon.nThis course will be especially beneficial to students interested in learning more about pursuing professional careers in musical theatre. Guest artist instructors will provide feedback on theatrical resumes, review audition etiquette, and generally advise students on navigating the professional theatre industry.
Terms: Sum | Units: 2 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

TAPS 14N: Imagining India: Art, Culture, Politics in Modern India (FEMGEN 14N)

This course explores history via cultural responses in modern India. We will examine a range of fiction, film and drama to consider the ways in which India emerges through its cultural productions. The course will consider key historical events such as the partition of the subcontinent, independence from British rule, Green Revolution, Emergency, liberalization of the Indian economy, among others. We will reflect on epochal historical moments by means of artisticnresponses to these events. For example, Ritwik Ghatak's experimental cinema intervenes into debates around the Bengal partition; Rohinton Mistry's novel, A Fine Balance grapples with the suspension of civil liberties during the emergency between 1975-77; Rahul Varma's play Bhopal reflects on the Bhopal gas tragedy, considered the world's worst industrial disaster. Students willnread, view and reflect on the aesthetic and historical texts through their thoughtful engagement in class discussions and written e ssays. They will also have opportunities to imaginatively respond to these texts via short creative projects, which could range from poems, monologues, solo pieces, web installations, etc. Readings will also include Mahashweta Devi, Amitav Ghosh, Girish Karnad, Jhumpa Lahiri, Manjula Padmanabhan, Salman Rushdie, Aparna Sen, among others.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-A-II, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Menon, J. (PI)

TAPS 15SC: Courtroom Theater

In the new millennium, the popularity of TV courtroom drama has been staggering: according to a weekly Nielsen ratings conducted a few years ago, 30 million people watched CSI: Crime Scene Investigation in one night, 70 million watched at least one of the CSI shows, and 40 million watched two other forensic dramas ( Without a Traceand Cold Case). These widely popular shows offer a somewhat distorted image of American criminal courtroom. In this class we will go "behind the scenes" to engage in a hands-on investigation of performances in the criminal trials. nWe will begin by visiting Bay Area courthouses to investigate the courtroom as a "set" for powerful legal dramas that are happening there on a daily basis. In these field trips we will also observe the courtroom proceedings and talk to judges and other legal professionals. After this introduction to the real-life courtroom, we will investigate landmark theatrical court dramas. Using mock trial techniques, we will approach playtexts as legal "cases." We will try to identify weaknesses and strengths of these cases, and then use them as mock trial scenarios. Ultimately, this class engages the questions of what does it take to build a solid courtroom case and how does it differ from a powerful piece of theater. While getting acquainted with both courtroom and theater techniques, we will keep a critical eye on (mis)representations of criminal courtroom in the popular media. No previous experience in acting or mock trials is necessary. The class is under submission for Creative Expression requirement. Sophomore College Course: Application required, due noon, April 7, 2015. Apply at http://soco.stanford.edu.
Terms: Sum | Units: 2 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

TAPS 20: Acting for Non-Majors (TAPS 124D)

Creative play, ensemble work in a supportive environment. Designed for the student to experience a range of new creative skills, from group improvisation to partner work. Introductory work on freeing the natural voice and physical relaxation. Emphasis on rediscovering imaginative and creative impulses. Movement improvisation, listening exercises, and theater games release the energy, playfulness and willingness to take risks that is the essence of free and powerful performance. Course culminates with work on dramatic text.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-3 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

TAPS 20A: Acting for Non-Majors

A class designed for all interested students. Creative play, ensemble work in a supportive environment. Designed for the student to experience a range of new creative skills, from group improvisation to partner work. Introductory work on freeing the natural voice and physical relaxation. Emphasis on rediscovering imaginative and creative impulses. Movement improvisation, listening exercises, and theater games release the energy, playfulness and willingness to take risks that is the essence of free and powerful performance. Course culminates with work on dramatic text.
Terms: Sum | Units: 2 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

TAPS 21: StoryCraft

StoryCraft is a hands-on, experiential workshop offering participants the opportunity, structure and guidance to craft compelling personal stories to be shared in front of a live audience. nThe class will focus on several areas of storytelling:n Mining ¿ how do you find your stories and extract the richest details?n Crafting ¿ how do you structure the content and shape the language?n Performing ¿ how do you share your stories with presence, authenticity and connection? nnWill meet Wednesday evenings from 7-9pm
Terms: Aut, Spr | Units: 2 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Klein, D. (PI)
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