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ARTHIST 263B: The View through the Windshield: Cars and the American Landscape

Both cars and the landscape are fundamental to American identity. This seminar will consider the relationship between them: how they have shaped each other, how one mediates the experience of the other, and how American artists such as Ansel Adams, Edward Hopper, and Ed Ruscha have represented both. We will discuss the relationship between nature and technology; the aesthetics of highways and parkways; the phenomenology of driving and road trips; maps and way finding; and the future of cars, mapping, and the landscape.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ARTHIST 264A: Picturing the Cosmos

This seminar explores the place of images in how we understand and imagine the universe. The course draws on art, science, and popular culture, and pays particular attention to the ways they inform each other. Examples include: star maps, science fiction films, appropriated astronomical images, and telescopic views of stars, planets, and nebulae. Using these representations as well as accompanying readings we will discuss the importance of aesthetics for conceptions of the cosmos; the influence of technology on representations; strategies for representing concepts that exceed the limits of human vision; and the ways that views of the universe reflect and shape their cultural context. Open to undergraduates and graduates.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ARTHIST 264B: Starstuff: Space and the American Imagination (AMSTUD 143X, FILMSTUD 264B)

Course on the history of twentieth and twenty-first century American images of space and how they shape conceptions of the universe. Covers representations made by scientists and artists, as well as scientific fiction films, TV, and other forms of popular visual culture. Topics will include the importance of aesthetics to understandings of the cosmos; the influence of media and technology on representations; the social, political, and historical context of the images; and the ways representations of space influence notions of American national identity and of cosmic citizenship.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ARTHIST 278: Introduction to Curating

Gain hands-on curatorial experience at the Cantor Arts Center by developing an exhibition in the Oceanic gallery about the Global Southn(the Indian Ocean region). Explore and debate strategies for presenting diverse art forms, conduct research, prepare wall texts and labels, and participate in designing the exhibition space in collaboration with fellow students, faculty, and Cantor staff members.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ARTHIST 278S: Stanford Collects: A History of Collecting (HISTORY 7S)

Leland Stanford, Jr. was a curator extraordinaire. His collecting shaped Stanford into a university, an archive, a library, and a museum. Students will explore Stanford's campus collections to discover how objects and artifacts tell the history not only of the university, but also Palo Alto, California, and the American West writ large. The course is hosted in Green Library and features visits to the Cantor Arts Center, Stanford University Archaeology Collections, and more. All majors welcome. Priority given to history majors and minors.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Toledano, A. (PI)

ARTSINST 11Q: Art in the Metropolis (TAPS 11Q)

This seminar is offered in conjunction with the annual "Arts Immersion" trip to New York that takes place over the spring break and is organized by the Stanford Arts Institute (SAI). Participation in the trip is a requirement for taking part in the seminar (and vice versa). The trip is designed to provide a group of students with the opportunity to immerse themselves in the cultural life of New York City guided by faculty and the SAI programming director. Students will experience a broad range and variety of art forms (visual arts, theater, opera, dance, etc.) and will meet with prominent arts administrators and practitioners, some of whom are Stanford alumni. For further details and updates about the trip, see http://arts.stanford.edu.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Jenkins, N. (PI)

ARTSINST 182: Activating Urban Spaces: Materializing Hidden Narratives in the Urban Environment (URBANST 182)

This course will investigate the organization and shaping of public space from the perspective of story and narrative. The course will consider how authorized narratives feature in the built environment and in the social spaces and usage of the city and how unauthorized, sometimes contentious narratives lurk beneath the surface and persist on the "skin" of the city. It will investigate the role of artists and the arts in "mapping" or surfacing alternative stories, concepts and imaginations of how the city is or can be. Inspired by the writings of Michel DeCerteau and Italio Calvino, this class explores the role of narrative in the city and the imagination from the perspective of cultural memory, lived experience, usage of space and organization of the built infrastructure. It offers an alternative approach to thinking about cities, how they are formed and how they function. This class will utilize and combine active field research methods with creative practice. Locations for our field more »
This course will investigate the organization and shaping of public space from the perspective of story and narrative. The course will consider how authorized narratives feature in the built environment and in the social spaces and usage of the city and how unauthorized, sometimes contentious narratives lurk beneath the surface and persist on the "skin" of the city. It will investigate the role of artists and the arts in "mapping" or surfacing alternative stories, concepts and imaginations of how the city is or can be. Inspired by the writings of Michel DeCerteau and Italio Calvino, this class explores the role of narrative in the city and the imagination from the perspective of cultural memory, lived experience, usage of space and organization of the built infrastructure. It offers an alternative approach to thinking about cities, how they are formed and how they function. This class will utilize and combine active field research methods with creative practice. Locations for our field research and excursions will include areas around Stanford and the Bay Area. The class will function as a hybrid seminar and collaborative studio workspace supporting students interested in applying creative practices to field research to develop methods for materializing narratives in various forms of public performance or place-specific art.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-4 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Kayim, G. (PI)

ARTSINST 184: Creativity: Anatomy of a Buzzword (URBANST 186)

Creativity is one of the defining values of our time, embraced by corporate CEOs, kindergarten teachers, and starving artists alike. Yet it not always clear what creativity means. This course will explore how the capacious concept of creativity has shaped contemporary ideals of work, art, technology, human nature, and the good society. Using a mix of popular texts, contemporary scholarship, and classics of social thought, we will look at what kinds of products, places, and people count as 'creative' in public conversation, and why. Particular attention will be paid to how different overlapping notions of creativity have guided arts policy, business practices, and urban economic strategy over the last few decades of capitalist development. Using Stanford itself as a case study, students will conduct field work to discover how the concept of creativity operates across and between the various departments, disciplines, and centers on campus, from the fine arts to psychology to business. Th more »
Creativity is one of the defining values of our time, embraced by corporate CEOs, kindergarten teachers, and starving artists alike. Yet it not always clear what creativity means. This course will explore how the capacious concept of creativity has shaped contemporary ideals of work, art, technology, human nature, and the good society. Using a mix of popular texts, contemporary scholarship, and classics of social thought, we will look at what kinds of products, places, and people count as 'creative' in public conversation, and why. Particular attention will be paid to how different overlapping notions of creativity have guided arts policy, business practices, and urban economic strategy over the last few decades of capitalist development. Using Stanford itself as a case study, students will conduct field work to discover how the concept of creativity operates across and between the various departments, disciplines, and centers on campus, from the fine arts to psychology to business. This research will culminate in the final group project: a multimedia archive and digital concept map of creativity discourse at Stanford. Students will come away from the class with concrete research skills and theoretical tools that will enable them to critically engage with any big ideas in the public sphere, as well as a better understanding of recent economic and cultural history underpinning our everyday assumptions and widely held values.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Franklin, S. (PI)

ARTSTUDI 153N: Ecology of Materials

This hands on studio based sculpture course takes a critical look at the materials used in sculpture and addresses the environmental concerns surrounding them. We will look at artists concerned with environmental impact and the interconnection of art to other fields. This class also addresses the impact of material and technique upon form and content; therefore understanding the physical and expressive possibilities of diverse materials. Conceptual and technical considerations will be addressed. Students will learn traditional building techniques as needed (wood shop, metal shop, mold making, found object) as well as anti-object techniques. Existing at the intersection of art, science, technology and ecology, environmental art often functions to inform and/or interpret natural conditions and the processes associated with both "non-human" and "human-made" constructions. It will also educate us about environmental issues and concerns. This course introduces and provides a context for thi more »
This hands on studio based sculpture course takes a critical look at the materials used in sculpture and addresses the environmental concerns surrounding them. We will look at artists concerned with environmental impact and the interconnection of art to other fields. This class also addresses the impact of material and technique upon form and content; therefore understanding the physical and expressive possibilities of diverse materials. Conceptual and technical considerations will be addressed. Students will learn traditional building techniques as needed (wood shop, metal shop, mold making, found object) as well as anti-object techniques. Existing at the intersection of art, science, technology and ecology, environmental art often functions to inform and/or interpret natural conditions and the processes associated with both "non-human" and "human-made" constructions. It will also educate us about environmental issues and concerns. This course introduces and provides a context for this area of interdisciplinary exchange and artist production by examining areas commonly known as cradle to cradle design, land art, eco art, environmental art, and art and technology. What role does sculpture play in a fragile world with depleting natural resources, global economies and media dominance? What is the life cycle of object making and creating? What is our relationship to objects in a growing technological age? Students will make 3-4 projects based on these questions. Group discussions, critiques, readings, video presentations, a field trip to a local artist-in-residence program Recology at the San Francisco Dump, visiting artists and visiting faculty from Stanford doing environmental research will augment this class.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-CE | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ARTSTUDI 162: Embodied Interfaces

Our computers, phones and devices ¿see¿ us predominately as fingers and single eyes staring at screens. What would happen if our technology acknowledged more of our rich physical presence and capabilities in its design? How have artists and designers used different sensing technologies to account for more of our embodied selves in their works? In this studio course we will explore various sensing technologies and design pieces that engage our whole selves. Interfaces explored will range from the practical to the poetic. Sensors may involve flex sensors, heat sensors, microphones and simple camera tracking technology. We will analyze different tools for their appropriateness for different tasks and extend them through our designs.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-CE | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Mendoza, N. (PI)
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