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1 - 10 of 14 results for: ILAC ; Currently searching winter courses. You can expand your search to include all quarters

ILAC 131: Introduction to Latin America: Cultural Perspectives

Part of the Gateways to the World program, this is an introductory course for all things Latin American: culture, history, literature, and current events. By combining lecture and seminar formats, the class prepares you for all subsequent research on, and learning about, the region. Comparative discussion of independence movements in Mexico, Central America, the Caribbean, the Andean Region, Brazil, and the Southern Cone. Other topics vary yearly, including: representations of ethnicity and class, the Cold War, popular culture, as well as major thinkers and writers. Open to all. Recommended for students who want to study abroad in Santiago, Chile. Required for majors in Spanish or Iberian and Latin American Cultures (ILAC). In Spanish.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ILAC 132: Drug Wars: from Pablo Escobar to the Mara Salvatrucha to Iguala Mass Student Kidnapping

This course will study the ways in which Latin American Narcos are represented in feature films, documentaries, essays, and novels. We will choose two regions and times: Pablo Escobar's Colombia (1949-1993) and current Mexico (1990-2015), including the mass students kidnappings in Iguala, México, 2014. Films: Sins of my Father (Entel, 2009); Pablo's Hippos (Lawrence Elman, 2010); True Story of Killing Pablo, David Keane (2002), Sumas y restas (Víctor Gaviria, 2003); La vida loca (Poveda, 2009), Sin nombre (Cary Fukunaga, 2009), El velador (Almada, 2011); La jaula de oro (Quemada-Díez, 2013); La bestia (Pedro Ultreras, 2010); Cartel Land (Heineman, 2015); The Missing 43 (Vice, 2015). Books: Alejandra Inzunza, José Luis Pardo, Pablo Ferri: Narco America, de los Andes a Manhattan (2015); Sergio González Rodríguez: El hombre sin cabeza (2010); Rafael Ramírez Heredia: La Mara (2004).
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ILAC 136: Modern Iberian Literatures

1800 to the mid 20th century. Topics include: romanticism; realism and its variants; the turn of the century; modernism and the avant garde; the Civil War; and the first half of the 20th century. Authors may include Mariano Jose de Larra, Gustavo Adolfo Becquer, Rosalia de Castro, Benito Perez Galdos, Jacint Verdaguer, Eca de Queiros, Miguel de Unamuno, Ramon de Valle-Inclan, Antonio Machado, and Federico García Lorca. Taught in Spanish. Prerequisites: SPANLANG 13 or equivalent.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Surwillo, L. (PI)

ILAC 199: Individual Work

Open only to students in the department, or by consent of instructor.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-12 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ILAC 201: Modern Spanish Theater

Survey of Spanish theater from 19th- to 21st-centuries.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ILAC 235: Critique of Technology (STS 200L)

Informed citizens living in today's world, and especially in Silicon Valley, should be able to formulate their own, articulate positions about the role of technology in culture. The course gives students the tools to do so. Against the trend towards the thoughtless celebration of all things technological, we will engage in critique in the two senses of the term: as careful study of the cultural implications of technology and as balanced, argumentative criticism. Can technology make life more meaningful, society more fair, people smarter, and the world smaller? Selections by fiction writers, philosophers and thinkers (such as Heidegger and Beller), as well as recent popular works of social commentary, such as You are not a Gadget, The Shallows, 24/7, and Present Shock.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ILAC 247: Film and Politics: Argentina in the Hour of the Furnaces

Argentina is the best example of a Latin American country that went from democracy to dictatorship, to war (Falkland Islands war) to democracy, to terrorist attacks (against AMIA, the Jewish center), to financial crisis (Corralito), to corruption, to a polemically unique leftist female president (Cristina Kirchner). This course will focus in the documentary work of Fernando Solanas (The hour of the furnaces, Fierro's sons, Tangos, South, Social Genocide, Latent Argentina, The Dignity of the Nobodies, The next station, etc.) that covers sixty years of convulsive history and social crisis.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ILAC 266: Beware of the Animal: Narratives of Animality and Care in Latin America

What can we learn from literary and filmed representation of care? What is the relationship between care and animality? Taking stock of a growing number of contemporary Latin American novels and films that focus on precarious forms of shared life (animal and human-animal), the course explores the ambiguous directionality of care for and against to consider new forms of human-nonhuman collectivities. We study different modes of care and caring identities. In Spanish.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Briceno, X. (PI)

ILAC 278A: Senior Seminar: Machado de Assis. Discourse Networks and the Novel in Brazil

This course is designed to present the father of Modern Novel in Brazil, Machado de Assis, through a close reading of some of his masterpieces: The Posthumous Memoirs of Bras Cubas (1881), Dom Casmurro (1900), The Alienist and his short stories. Topics include: Slavery in Rio de Janeiro; Samba, Capoeira and Literature, the media revolution of 1880. In Portuguese, with Spanish section.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ILAC 293E: Baroque and Neobaroque (COMPLIT 233, ENGLISH 233)

The literary, cultural, and political implications of the 17th-century phenomenon formed in response to the conditions of the 16th century including humanism, absolutism, and early capitalism, and dispersed through Europe, the Americas, and Asia. If the Baroque is a universal code of this period, how do its vehicles, such as tragic drama, Ciceronian prose, and metaphysical poetry, converse with one another? The neobaroque as a complex reaction to the remains of the baroque in Latin American cultures, with attention to the mode in recent Brazilian literary theory and Mexican poetry.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Greene, R. (PI)
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