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481 - 490 of 582 results for: all courses

POLISCI 212C: Civil War and International Politics: Syria in Context (POLISCI 212X)

The Syrian civil war is both a humanitarian disaster and a focal point for a set of interlocking regional and international political struggles. This course uses the Syrian case as an entry for exploring broader questions, such as why do civil wars begin, how do they end, and what are the international politics of civil war. Please enroll in 212C for WIM credit.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

POLISCI 212X: Civil War and International Politics: Syria in Context (POLISCI 212C)

The Syrian civil war is both a humanitarian disaster and a focal point for a set of interlocking regional and international political struggles. This course uses the Syrian case as an entry for exploring broader questions, such as why do civil wars begin, how do they end, and what are the international politics of civil war. Please enroll in 212C for WIM credit.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

POLISCI 215: Explaining Ethnic Violence

What is ethnic violence and why does it occur? Should elite machinations, the psychology of crowds, or historical hatreds be blamed? Case studies and theoretical work on the sources and nature of ethnic violence. Counts as Writing in the Major for PoliSci majors.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

POLISCI 223: The Politics of Gender in the United States (FEMGEN 223X)

Gender is one of the most recognizable and important identities in daily life. Yet it has been paid scant attention by political scientists in terms of its role on access to political power, opinion formation, group identity politics, election outcomes, and political representation. This class provides a survey of the literature on gender in American politics. We begin with the interdisciplinary research on the social construction of gender to understand what gender is and is not. Throughout the course we will use these theories to analyze and critique the approaches of quantitative research on gender politics.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

POLISCI 224C: Heretics to Headscarves (HISTORY 102C)

Broad survey of religious discrimination and persecution in the Euro-American tradition, and the rise of tolerationist ideas and practices, from Augustine's rationale for punishing dissenters to the current European debates over the regulation of Islam. Topics include the Inquisition; struggles over toleration in Reformation Europe; the impact of Locke, Bayle, and Spinoza; Spanish practice in the Americas; and the American constitutional experiment in free exercise.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Rakove, J. (PI)

POLISCI 226: Race and Racism in American Politics (AMSTUD 226, CSRE 226, POLISCI 326)

Topics include the historical conceptualization of race; whether and how racial animus reveals itself and the forms it might take; its role in the creation and maintenance of economic stratification; its effect on contemporary U.S. partisan and electoral politics; and policy making consequences.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Segura, G. (PI)

POLISCI 227: U.S. Immigration Politics

This course presents an overview of immigration in the United States. We will focus on current policies, U.S. immigration history, individual immigrant groups, economic causes and consequences of immigration, attitudes toward immigrants, U.S. national identity, immigrant political behavior, undocumented immigration, immigrants and public education, language barriers and policies, and immigration reform. Although the course is crafted with a focus on the U.S. as a whole, we will also spend a little time at the end of the quarter narrowing in on the California context, before taking a broader look at immigration in Western Europe to gain a comparative prospective on immigration. Finally, while we will discuss immigrant groups beyond Latinos, the course will disproportionately focus on Latino immigrants, as this is by far the largest immigrant group in the United States.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

PSYC 82Q: Psychosis and Literature

One of the great gifts of literature is its ability to give us insight into the internal worlds of others. Perhaps nowhere is this gift as rare and crucial as in our attempt to understand the experience of mental illness. This is particularly true of that state clinicians call "psychosis." But psychosis is a slippery term, with definitions ranging from being "out of touch with reality" to states of hallucination and delusion, to "disorganization of thought and speech." It is devastating and terrifying both for patients and families, and yet shares many characteristics with other, less pathological states, such as mysticism and creativity. How then can we begin to make sense of it? In this course, we will examine the first-hand experience of psychosis in letters, memoirs and fiction. Our goal will be to learn how to read such texts from multiple perspectives, examining not only clinical, social, and historical aspects of psychosis, but also what they offer as unique literary works of art. We will look at texts as diverse as Shakespeare and the science fiction writer Philip K. Dick, supplementing them with film and paintings. This class is not only for students thinking of careers in medicine, psychology or anthropology, but also readers and writers interested exploring extraordinary texts. Along the way, we will be paying attention to lessons that we take for our own writing. There are no prerequisites necessary; all that is needed is a love of language and a curiosity about the secrets of other minds.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Mason, D. (PI)

PSYCH 70: Introduction to Social Psychology

Topics related to the influence of other people on individuals' thoughts, emotions, and behaviors. Factors that affect the way that we perceive ourselves and others; how people influence others; how persuasion happens; what causes us to like, love, help, or hurt others; and how social psychology helps to understand quesions about law, business, and health. Fulfills WIM requirement
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

PSYCH 75: Introduction to Cultural Psychology

The cultural sources of diversity in thinking, emotion, motivation, self, personality, morality, development, and psychopathology.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
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