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21 - 30 of 582 results for: all courses

AFRICAAM 152G: Harlem Renaissance and Modernism (AMSTUD 152G, ENGLISH 152G)

Examination of the explosion of African American artistic expression during 1920s and 30s New York known as the Harlem Renaissance. Amiri Baraka once referred to the Renaissance as a kind of "vicious Modernism", as a "BangClash", that impacted and was impacted by political, cultural and aesthetic changes not only in the U.S. but Europe, the Caribbean and Latin America. Focus on the literature, graphic arts, and the music of the era in this global context.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-AmerCul, WAY-A-II, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Elam, M. (PI)

AFRICAAM 156: Performing History: Race, Politics, and Staging the Plays of August Wilson (TAPS 156, TAPS 356)

This course purposefully and explicitly mixes theory and practice. Students will read and discuss the plays of August Wilson, the most celebrated and most produced contemporary American playwright, that comprise his 20th Century History Cycle. Class stages scenes from each of these plays, culminating in a final showcase of longer scenes from his work as a final project.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

AFRICAAM 159: James Baldwin & Twentieth Century Literature (ENGLISH 159, FEMGEN 159)

Black, gay and gifted, Baldwin was hailed as a ¿spokesman for the race¿¿although he personally, and controversially, eschewed titles and classifications of all kinds. This course examines his classic novels and essays as well his exciting work across many lesser-examined domains¿poetry, music, theatre, sermon, photo-text, children¿s literature, public media, comedy and artistic collaboration. Placing his work in context with other writers of the 20C (Faulkner, Wright,Morrison) and capitalizing on a resurgence of interest in the writer (NYC just dedicated a year of celebration of Baldwin and there are 2 new journals dedicated to study of Baldwin), the course seeks to capture the power and influence of Baldwin's work during the Civil Rights era as well as his relevance in the ¿post-race¿ transnational 21st century, when his prescient questioning of the boundaries of race, sex, love, leadership and country assume new urgency.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Elam, M. (PI)

AFRICAAM 165: Identity and Academic Achievement (CSRE 165, VPTL 165)

How do social identities affect how people experience academic interactions? How can learning environments be better structured to support the success of all students? In this class, we will explore how a variety of identities such as race, gender, social class, and athletic participation can affect academic achievement, with the goal of identifying concrete strategies to make learning environments at Stanford and similar universities more inclusive. Readings will draw from psychology, sociology, education, and popular press. This class is a seminar format.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Crosby, J. (PI)

AFRICAAM 181Q: Alternative Viewpoints: Black Independent Film (FILMSTUD 181Q, TAPS 181Q)

Preference to sophomores. Do you want to learn more about independent film as it was practiced in major urban centers by young filmmakers? This class focuses on major movements by groups such as the Sankofa Film Collective and the L.A. Rebellion. Learn how to analyze film and to discuss the politics of production as you watch films by Spike Lee, Julie Dash, Melvin Van Peebles, Ngozi Onwurah and more. We will discuss representation, lighting, press material, and of course the films themselves. This course includes a workshop on production, trips to local film festivals and time to critique films frame-by-frame. It matters who makes film and how they do so. When you have completed this class you will be able to think critically about "alternative viewpoints" to Hollywood cinema. You will understand how independent films are made and you will be inspired to seek out and perhaps produce or promote new visions.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

AFRICAAM 192: Sexual Violence in America (AMSTUD 258, CSRE 192E, FEMGEN 258, FEMGEN 358, HISTORY 258, HISTORY 358)

This undergraduate/graduate colloquium explores the history of sexual violence in America, with particular attention to the intersections of gender and race in the construction of rape. We discuss the changing definitions of sexual violence in law and in cultural representations from early settlement through the late-twentieth century, including slavery, wartime and prison rape, the history of lynching and anti-lynching movements, and feminist responses to sexual violence. In addition to introducing students to the literature on sexual violence, the course attempts to teach critical skills in the analysis of secondary and primary historical texts. Students write short weekly reading responses and a final paper; no final exam; fifth unit research or CEL options.nnLimited enrollment, permission of instructor required. Submit application form (available on Coursework) by Dec. 1, 2015 and indicate interest in CEL option. Priority admission to History, FGSS, CSRE, AFRICAAM, and AMSTUD declared majors and minors.
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-Gender, WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

AFRICAAM 194: Topics in Writing & Rhetoric: "We Gon Be Alright": Contemporary Black Rhetorics (PWR 194AJ)

Does not fulfill NSC requirement. What does the difference between Kendrick Lamar's "We Gon Be Alright" and older movement anthems like "Let Nobody Turn Us Around" tell us about differences in perspective held by contemporary Black activists and those of other eras? What strategies are people engaged in various kinds of work to "assert their collective humanity" and "gain acceptance for ideas relative to Black survival and Black liberation" using in the pursuit of those goals? What debates are taking place inside Black communities about activism? About community itself? What is it about twitter, vines and memes that have made those spaces such rich spaces for Black expressive cultures? What stylistic or aesthetic features mark those communicative efforts? Finally, what do young people themselves have to say about activism in this moment? This course will examine Black rhetoric from overtly persuasive political and activist discourse to Scandal watch parties and everyday conversation. Prerequisite: first level of the writing requirement or equivalent transfer credit. For topics, see https://undergrad.stanford.edu/programs/pwr/courses/advanced-pwr-courses.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Banks, A. (PI)

AFRICAAM 226: Mixed-Race Politics and Culture (AMSTUD 152K, CSRE 152K)

Today, almost one-third of Americans identify with a racial/ethnic minority group, and more than 9 million Americans identify with multiple races. What are the implications of such diversity for American politics and culture? This course approaches issues of race from an interdisciplinary perspective, employing research in the social sciences and humanities to assess how race shapes perceptions of identity as well as political behavior in 21st-century U.S. Issues surrounding the role of multiculturalism, immigration, acculturation, racial representation, and racial prejudice in American society. Topics include the political and social formation of race; racial representation in the media, arts, and popular culture; the rise and decline of the "one-drop rule" and its effect on political and cultural attachments; the politicization of census categories and the rise of the multiracial movement.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

AFRICAST 48S: History of Health, Science and Medicine in 20th Century Africa (ANTHRO 48S, HISTORY 48S)

This course will examine the impact of colonial policies and post-colonial development on patterns of sickness, wellness and health care in twentieth century sub-Saharan Africa. Some topics will include: the role of colonial science in the formulation of ideas about race, colonial epidemics, labor migration and disease, urban health, encounters between African healers and biomedicine, histories of HIV/AIDS, the impact of debt and Structural Adjustment Programs on public health, and the politics of humanitarian interventions in African health. Priority given to history majors and minors.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Hill, R. (PI)

AFRICAST 81: Media Representations of Africa (AFRICAST 181)

How has Africa been dominantly represented in the media? How are these representations challenged, complexified and reproduced in the postcolonial context? What is the role of African media in these processes? This class is an introduction to the variety of roles played by the media in representing Africa, with a particular focus on the postcolonial context. The topic is particularly relevant to contemporary Africa as the emerging middle-class, economic and cultural globalization, and the uptake for communication technologies are shaping contested images of the continent. You will: develop a theoretical and empirical understanding of the media as instruments of domination but also of resistance; learn how to critically deconstruct media representations in everyday life; understand the challenges of intercultural communication in an unequal world. Key concepts such as: representation, stereotyping, cultural appropriation, afropessimism, afrocentrism, afro optimism, afropolitanism. Readings drawn from media and cultural studies, anthropology, postcolonial theory and literature. In class-analysis of photographs, news articles and broadcasts, PR campaigns, social media, films and documentaries.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Nothias, T. (PI)
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