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1 - 10 of 18 results for: FRENCH ; Currently searching autumn courses. You can expand your search to include all quarters

FRENCH 122: Nation in Motion: Film, Race and Immigration in Contemporary French Cinema (CSRE 65, FRENCH 332)

Examines the current debates in France regarding national identity, secularism, and the integration of immigrants, notably from the former colonies. Confronts films' and other media's visual and discursive rhetorical strategies used to represent ethnic or religious minorities, discrimination, radicalization, terrorism, inter-racial marriages, or women's rights within immigrant communities. By embodying such themes in stories of love, hardships, or solidarity, the motion pictures make the movements and emotions inherent to immigration tangible: to what effect? Taught in English. Films in French with English subtitles. Additional paper for students enrolled in 332.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-A-II, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

FRENCH 129: Camus (CSRE 129, HISTORY 235F)

"The Don Draper of Existentialism" for Adam Gopnik, "the ideal husband of contemporary letters" for Susan Sontag, and "the admirable conjunction of a man, of an action, and of a work" for Sartre, Camus embodies the very French figure of the "intellectuel engagé," or public intellectual. From his birth in 1913 into a poor family in Algeria to the Nobel Prize in Literature in 1957, from Saint Germain-des-Prés to his predilection for the mediterranean culture, Camus captured the quest for universalism, for the politics of justice, and engaged in the great ethical battles of his time, from the fight against nazism and communism, from questioning colonial rules to the haunting Algerian War, and his complex "silence" over the war. Camus the Algerian, Camus the moralist, Camus the Resistant: through readings and films, we will explore his multiple, long-lasting legacies. Readings from Albert Camus, Kamel Daoud, Mouloud Feraoun, Alice Kaplan, Orhan Pamuk, A.B. Yehoshua, Assia Djebar, Jean-Paul Sartre, Yasmina Khadra. Movies include "The Stranger," and "Far from Men." This course is a gateway for French Studies, with special emphasis on oral proficiency. Taught in French.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Ulloa, M. (PI)

FRENCH 130: Introduction to Medieval and Renaissance French Literature

Introduction to the Middle Ages and the Renaissance. The birth of a national literature and its evolution. Literature as addressing cultural, philosophical, and artistic issues which question assumptions on love, ethics, art, and the nature of the self. Readings: epics (La Chanson de Roland), medieval romances (Tristan, Chrétien de Troyes' Yvain), post-Petrarchan poetics (Du Bellay, Ronsard, Labé), and prose humanists (Rabelais, Montaigne). Taught in French. Prerequisite: FRENLANG 124 or consent of instructor.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Galvez, M. (PI)

FRENCH 147: Revolutions from Ancient Greece to the Arab Spring (DLCL 127, HISTORY 214G)

This course looks at theories of revolution and political or social change from ancient Greece to the Arab Spring. The course will provide a close reading of a selection of texts from ancient Greek political writing (Plato, Aristotle), medieval and early modern political advice literature (Marsilius of Padua, Machiavelli), and modern political thought (Tocqueville). Later sections of the course look at how the insights derived from the history of political thought can help generate a new framework for the study of modern revolutions, such as the Iranian Revolution and the Arab Spring. INSTRUCTOR: Vasileios Syros Note: Instructor has submitted WTWD for Social Inquiry (SI) and Ethical Reasoning (ER).
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-ER | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

FRENCH 199: Individual Work

Restricted to French majors with consent of department. Normally limited to 4-unit credit toward the major. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-12 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

FRENCH 208: When Europe Spoke French: The Power of Culture and the Culture of Power

For much of modern history (ca. 1600-1900), French culture occupied a similar global place that American culture does today: it was the preferred "other" culture in the realms of entertainment, research, and polite conversation. As with America today, the French state was also a military superpower in European and global affairs. This course will explore how French culture and government combined to create this new model of culture based on refinement and the projection of power. Expressed through language, literature, and architecture (most famously, Versailles), this elite form of culture would come to symbolize education and social status from Lisbon to St-Petersburg. Readings will include historical accounts of early-modern France and Europe, as well as works by Corneille, Molière, Racine, Voltaire, Montesquieu, and Rousseau. Taught in French.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

FRENCH 217: Planes, Trains, and Automobiles: Transportation, Tourism, and the Making of Modern Europe (HISTORY 236E)

This course traces a history of how over the past two centuries various innovations in transportation technologies have shaped so much of how our world works: from how we eat, to how we relax, to how we dream, to the houses we live in, to how our financial systems work, and to how new ideas spread.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Braude, M. (PI)

FRENCH 246: Body over Mind (FRENCH 346, ITALIAN 246, ITALIAN 346)

How does modern fiction, aided by modern philosophy, give the lie to Descartes' famous "I think therefore I am"? And how does writing convey the desire for a different, perhaps stronger, integration of mind and body? Does the body speak a particular truth that we must learn to hear, that the mind is not always connected to? How do modern metaphors for the mind-body connection shape our experience? These questions will be explored via the works of major French and Italian writers and thinkers, including Pirandello, Calvino, Camus, Houellebecq, Sartre, and Agamben.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Wittman, L. (PI)

FRENCH 258: The Great War: WWI in Literature, Film, Art, and Memory (FRENCH 358, HISTORY 231C)

This course concerns how writers, artists, and other cultural producers understood and represented the traumas of the First World War and its aftermath. Rather than tracing a political or military history of the conflict, we¿ll focus on how the horrors of War (both in the trenches and on the home front) fostered broader social and cultural shifts, as people questioned the very foundations of European civilization. Most specifically, we'll explore the connections between the War and the emergence of post-War modernist movements, as writers and artists created new works to help them make sense of the catastrophe and the new world it wrought. Though France provides our starting point, we'll also travel beyond the Hexagon to incorporate other views and major works. Course readings will be in English, though students may elect to read works in French if they wish.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Braude, M. (PI)

FRENCH 259: France Since 1900: Politics, Culture, Society (FRENCH 359, HISTORY 238, HISTORY 338)

This course explores how France experienced some of the most tumultuous episodes in modern history, including world wars, collaboration and genocide, wars of decolonization, globalization, immigration, and economic decline. Our sources will include a rich combination of novels, films, architecture, and memoirs, including many classics of their chosen genres.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Daughton, J. (PI)
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