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101 - 110 of 197 results for: all courses

KOREA 20Q: Humanities Core: Dao, Virtue, and Nature -- Foundations of East Asian Thought (CHINA 20Q, HUMCORE 20Q, JAPAN 20Q)

This course explores the values and questions posed in the formative period of East Asian civilizations. Notions of a Dao ("Way") are common to Confucianism, Daoism, and Buddhism, but those systems of thought have radically different ideas about what that Dao is and how it might be realized in society and an individual's life. These systems of thought appeared first in China, and eventually spread to Korea and Japan. Each culture developed its own ways of reconciling the competing systems, but in each case the comprehensive structure of values and human ideals differs significantly from those that appeared elsewhere in the ancient world. The course examines East Asian ideas about self-cultivation, harmonious society, rulership, and the relation between human and nature with a view toward expanding our understanding of these issues in human history, and highlighting their legacies in Asian civilizations today. The course features selective readings in classics of Confucian, Daoist, and more »
This course explores the values and questions posed in the formative period of East Asian civilizations. Notions of a Dao ("Way") are common to Confucianism, Daoism, and Buddhism, but those systems of thought have radically different ideas about what that Dao is and how it might be realized in society and an individual's life. These systems of thought appeared first in China, and eventually spread to Korea and Japan. Each culture developed its own ways of reconciling the competing systems, but in each case the comprehensive structure of values and human ideals differs significantly from those that appeared elsewhere in the ancient world. The course examines East Asian ideas about self-cultivation, harmonious society, rulership, and the relation between human and nature with a view toward expanding our understanding of these issues in human history, and highlighting their legacies in Asian civilizations today. The course features selective readings in classics of Confucian, Daoist, and Buddhist texts that present the foundational tenets of Asian thought. N. B. This is the first of three courses in the Humanities Core, East Asian track. These courses show how history and ideas shape our world and future. Take all three to experience a year-long intellectual community dedicated to the life of the mind.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-ER | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Egan, R. (PI)

KOREA 121: Doing the Right Thing: Ethical Dilemmas in Korean Film (KOREA 221)

Ethics and violence seem to be contradictory terms, yet much of Korean film and literature in the past five decades has demonstrated that they are an intricate and in many ways justifiable part of the fabric of contemporary existence. Film exposes time and again the complex ways in which the supposed vanguards of morality, religious institutions, family, schools, and the state are sites of condoned transgression, wherein spiritual and physical violation is inflicted relentlessly. This class will explore the ways in which questions about Truth and the origins of good and evil are mediated through film in the particular context of the political, social, and economic development of postwar South Korea. Tuesday classes will include a brief introduction followed by a film screening that will last on average for two hours; students that are unable to stay until 5 pm will be required to watch the rest of the film on their own.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-4 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-ER | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Zur, D. (PI)

ME 267: Ethics and Equity in Transportation Systems

Transportation is a crucial element of human life. It enables communication with others, provides access to employment / economic opportunity, and transports goods upon which we depend. However, transportation also generates negative impacts: pollution, noise, energy consumption and risk to human life. Because of its enormous capability to affect our lives, transportation is one of the most highly regulated businesses in the world. These regulations are designed to promote social welfare, improve access, and protect vulnerable populations. This course examines the origins and impacts of transportation policy and regulation: who benefits, who bears the cost, and how social and individual objectives are achieved.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-ER | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

OSPFLOR 46: Images of Evil in Criminal Justice

Iconographic component of criminal law; reasons and functions of the visual representation of criminal wrongdoing. Historical roots of "evil typecasting;" consideration of its variations with respect to common law and civil law systems. Fundamental features of the two legal systems. Sources, actors, enforcement mechanisms of the criminal law compared; study of cases in the area of murder, sex offences, organized crime and terrorism. Different techniques of image typecasting highlighted and discussed. International criminal law, which takes the burden to describe, typecast and punish forms of "enormous, disproportionate evil," such as genocide and other mass atrocities.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-ER | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Papa, M. (PI)

OSPFLOR 70: The Value of Life: Philosophical Foundations

Analysis of the value of life from a philosophical point of view, presenting lay foundations of bioethics. Three main steps. 1) The notion of life, which can be seen from different angles and with diverse intentions; comparative analysis of plural interpretations of the notion of life, economic, scientific, religious, and the limits of the notion itself. 2) Ethics as a theory of value, the metaphysical background of life, and the structure of bioethics; a vision of life as a "critical choice", which implies respect for life and individual responsibility; some non-Western ideas on the value of life. 3) Practical issues such as the meaning of death, abortion and euthanasia
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-ER | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

OSPMADRD 57: Health Care: A Contrastive Analysis between Spain and the U.S.

History of health care and evolution of the concept of universal health care based on need not wealth. Contrast with system in U.S. Is there a right to health care and if so, what does it encompass? The Spanish health care system; its major successes and shortcomings. Issues and challenges from an interdisciplinary perspective combining scientific facts with moral, political, and legal philosophy.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-ER | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

OSPMADRD 72: Issues in Bioethics Across Cultures

Ethical dilemmas concerning the autonomy and dignity of human beings and other living creatures; principles of justice that rule different realms of private and public life. Interdisciplinary approach to assessing these challenges, combining scientific facts, health care issues, and moral philosophy. Sources include landmark bioethics papers. Prerequisite: completion of SPANLANG 11, 21B or placement, or instructor approval.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-ER | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

PHIL 2: Introduction to Moral Philosophy (ETHICSOC 20)

What should I do with my life? What kind of person should I be? How should we treat others? What makes actions right or wrong? What is good and what is bad? What should we value? How should we organize society? Is there any reason to be moral? Is morality relative or subjective? How, if at all, can such questions be answered? Intensive introduction to theories and techniques in contemporary moral philosophy.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-EthicReas, WAY-A-II, WAY-ER | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Maguire, B. (PI)

PHIL 5N: The Art of Living

Whether we realize it or not, all of us are forced to make a fundamental choice: by deciding what is most valuable to us, we decide how we are going to live our life. We may opt for a life of reason and knowledge; one of faith and discipline; one of nature and freedom; one of community and altruism; or one of originality and style.We may even choose to live our lives as though they were works of art. In every case, hard work is required: our lives are not just given to us, but need to be made. To live well is, in fact, to practice an art of living. Where, however, do such ideals come from? How do we adopt and defend them? What is required to put them into practice? What do we do when they come into conflict with one another? And what role do great works of art play in all this? "The Art of Living" will explore the various ways in which it is possible to live well and beautifully, what it takes to implement them, and what happens when they come under pressure from inside and out.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Winter 2014 | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-ER | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

PHIL 8N: Free Will and Responsibility

In what sense are we, or might we be free agents? Is our freedom compatible with our being fully a part of the same natural, causal order that includes other physical and biological systems? What assumptions about freedom do we make when we hold people accountable morally and/or legally? When we hold people accountable, and so responsible, can we also see them as part of the natural, causal order? Or is there a deep incompatibility between these two ways of understanding ourselves? What assumptions about our freedom do we make when we deliberate about what to do? Are these assumptions in conflict with seeing ourselves as part of the natural, causal order?nWe will explore these and related questions primarily by way of careful study of recent and contemporary philosophical research on these matters.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Spring 2016 | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II, WAY-ER | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
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