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1 - 10 of 44 results for: EARTHSYS

EARTHSYS 8: The Oceans: An Introduction to the Marine Environment (ESS 8)

The course will provide a basic understanding of how the ocean functions as a suite of interconnected ecosystems, both naturally and under the influence of human activities. Emphasis is on the interactions between the physical and chemical environment and the dominant organisms of each ecosystem. The types of ecosystems discussed include coral reefs, deep-sea hydrothermal vents, coastal upwelling systems, blue-water oceans, estuaries, and near-shore dead zones. Lectures, multimedia presentations, group activities, and tide-pooling day trip.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Arrigo, K. (PI)

EARTHSYS 9: Public Service Internship Preparation (ARTSINST 40, EDUC 9, HUMBIO 9, PUBLPOL 74, URBANST 101)

Are you prepared for your internship this summer? This workshop series will help you make the most of your internship experience by setting learning goals in advance; negotiating and communicating clear roles and expectations; preparing for a professional role in a non-profit, government, or community setting; and reflecting with successful interns and community partners on how to prepare sufficiently ahead of time. You will read, discuss, and hear from guest speakers, as well as develop a learning plan specific to your summer or academic year internship placement. This course is primarily designed for students who have already identified an internship for summer or a later quarter. You are welcome to attend any and all workshops, but must attend the entire series and do the assignments for 1 unit of credit.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

EARTHSYS 11: Introduction to Geology (GEOLSCI 1)

Why are earthquakes, volcanoes, and natural resources located at specific spots on the Earth surface? Why are there rolling hills to the west behind Stanford, and soaring granite walls to the east in Yosemite? What was the Earth like in the past, and what will it be like in the future? Lectures, hands-on laboratories, in-class activities, and one field trip will help you see the Earth through the eyes of a geologist. Topics include plate tectonics, the cycling and formation of different types of rocks, and how geologists use rocks to understand Earth's history.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-AQR, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

EARTHSYS 15: Gender, Land Rights, and Climate Change: An International Perspective

For decades, numerous and far-reaching consequences of anthropogenic climate change have disproportionately affected women, from poverty, food and water security, to land tenure and forced migration, to education and health. As a result, mitigating climate change has enormous implications for women's lives worldwide, yet too few national or international policies address this critical intersection. This weekly seminar will examine this dynamic in light of the Sustainable Development Goals and Paris Climate Treaty. The course will feature guest speakers, reading discussions, and communication exercises to spur policy reform and help students acquire relevant information for their future endeavors.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

EARTHSYS 36N: Life at the Extremes: From the Deep Sea to Deep Space

Preference to freshmen. Microbial life is diverse and resilient on Earth; could it survive elsewhere in our solar system? This seminar will investigate the diversity of microbial life on earth, with an emphasis on extremophiles, and consider the potential for microbial life to exist and persist in extraterrestrial locales. Topics include microbial phylogenetic and physiological diversity, biochemical adaptations of extremophiles, ecology of extreme habitats, and apparent requirements and limits of life. Format includes lectures, discussions, lab-based activities and local field trips. Basics of microbiology, biochemistry, and astrobiology.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

EARTHSYS 46N: Exploring the Critical Interface between the Land and Monterey Bay: Elkhorn Slough (ESS 46N)

Preference to freshmen. Field trips to sites in the Elkhorn Slough, a small agriculturally impacted estuary that opens into Monterey Bay, a model ecosystem for understanding the complexity of estuaries, and one of California's last remaining coastal wetlands. Readings include Jane Caffrey's Changes in a California Estuary: A Profile of Elkhorn Slough. Basics of biogeochemistry, microbiology, oceanography, ecology, pollution, and environmental management.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Francis, C. (PI)

EARTHSYS 58Q: Understanding Our Oceans: Scientific Toys, Tools, & Trips

In popular science magazines we read about deep ocean critters recently discovered or the latest threats coral reefs face. But what is it actually like to do science in the ocean-to research ocean life in the various ocean ecosystems? In this course, we will explore the latest advances in marine science-what technologies are allowing scientists to explore and investigate the ocean and what are we discovering. We will have field trips to marine research centers in Bodega, Santa Cruz, Moss Landing, and Monterey. This course will also expose students to what life as a marine biology/science graduate student is like.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

EARTHSYS 102: Fundamentals of Renewable Power (ENERGY 102)

Do you want a much better understanding of renewable power technologies? Did you know that wind and solar are the fastest growing forms of electricity generation? Are you interested in hearing about the most recent, and future, designs for green power? Do you want to understand what limits power extraction from renewable resources and how current designs could be improved? This course dives deep into these and related issues for wind, solar, biomass, geothermal, tidal and wave power technologies. We welcome all student, from non-majors to MBAs and grad students. If you are potentially interested in an energy or environmental related major, this course is particularly useful. Recommended: Math 21 or 42.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

EARTHSYS 103: Understanding Energy (CEE 107A, CEE 207A)

Energy is a fundamental driver of human development and opportunity. At the same time, our energy system has significant consequences for our society, political system, economy, and environment. For example, energy production and use is the number one source of greenhouse gas emissions. In taking this course, students will not only understand the fundamentals of each energy resource -- including significance and potential, conversion processes and technologies, drivers and barriers, policy and regulation, and social, economic, and environmental impacts -- students will also be able to put this in the context of the broader energy system and think critically about how and why society has chosen particular energy resources. Both depletable and renewable energy resources are covered, including oil, natural gas, coal, nuclear, biomass and biofuel, hydroelectric, wind, solar thermal and photovoltaics (PV), geothermal, and ocean energy, with cross-cutting topics including electricity, storage, climate change, sustainability, green buildings, energy efficiency, transportation, and the developing world. The course is 4 units, which includes lecture and in-class discussion, readings and videos, assignments, and two off-site field trips. Enroll for 5 units to also attend the Workshop, an interactive discussion section on cross-cutting topics that meets once per week for 80 minutes (timing TBD based on student schedules). The 3-unit option requires instructor approval - please contact Diana Ginnebaugh. Website: http://web.stanford.edu/class/cee207a/ Course was formerly called Energy Resources.nPrerequisites: Algebra. May not be taken for credit by students who have completed CEE 107S.
Terms: Aut, Spr | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

EARTHSYS 105: Food and Community: Food Security, Resilience and Equity (EARTHSYS 205)

What can communities do to bolster food security, resiliency, and equity in the face of climate change? This course aims to respond to this question, in three parts. In Part 1, we will explore the most current scientific findings on trends in anthropogenic climate forcing and the anticipated impacts on global and regional food systems. Specifically, Part I will review the anticipated impact of climate change on severe weather events, crop losses, and food price volatility and the influence of these impacts on global and regional food insecurity and hunger. In Part II, we will consider what communities can do to promote food security and equity in the face of these changes, by reviewing the emerging literature on food system resiliency. Finally, we will facilitate a conference in which multi-disciplinary teams from around the country will gather to initiate regional planning projects designed to enhance food system resilience and equity. Cardinal Course (certified by Haas Center). Limited enrollment. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Spr | Units: 2-3 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
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