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1 - 10 of 120 results for: CEE

CEE 1: Introduction to Environmental Systems Engineering

Field trips visiting environmental systems installations in Northern California, including coastal, freshwater, and urban infrastructure. Requirements: Several campus meetings, and field trips. Enrollment limited; priority given to undergraduates who have declared Environmental Systems Engineering major.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

CEE 6: Physics of Cities

An introduction to the modern study of complex systems with cities as an organizing focus. Topics will include: cities as interacting systems; cities as networks; flows of resources and information through cities; principles of organization, self-organization, and complexity; how the properties of cities scale with size; and human movement patterns. No particular scientific background is required, but comfort with basic mathematics will be assumed. Prerequisites: MATH 19 and 20, or the equivalent
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

CEE 31Q: Accessing Architecture Through Drawing

Preference to sophomores. Drawing architecture provides a deeper understanding of the intricacies and subtleties that characterize contemporary buildings. How to dissect buildings and appreciate the formal elements of a building, including scale, shape, proportion, colors and materials, and the problem solving reflected in the design. Students construct conventional architectural drawings, such as plans, elevations, and perspectives. Limited enrollment.
Terms: Aut, Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-CE | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Barton, J. (PI)

CEE 32F: Light, Color, and Space

This course explores color and light as a medium for spatial perception. Through the introduction of color theory, color mixing, and light analyses, students will learn to see and use light and color fields as a way to shape experience. We will examine the work of a range of architects and artist who use light and color to expand the field of perception (i.e. Rothko, Turrell, Eliasson, Holl, Aalto).
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Choe, B. (PI)

CEE 32H: Responsive Structures (CEE 132H)

This Design Build seminar investigates the use of metal as a structural, spatial and organizational medium. We will examine the physical properties of post-formable plywood, and develop a structural system and design which respond to site and programmatic conditions. The process includes model building, prototyping, development of joinery, and culminates in the full scale installation of the developed design on campus. This course may be repeated for credit (up to three times). Class meeting days/times are as follows:nApril 14, 9a-5p; April 28, 10a-5p; May 3, 7-9p; May 19, 10a-6:30p; May 20, 10a-6:30p.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Choe, B. (PI)

CEE 32R: American Architecture (AMSTUD 143A, ARTHIST 143A, ARTHIST 343A)

A historically based understanding of what defines American architecture. What makes American architecture American, beginning with indigenous structures of pre-Columbian America. Materials, structure, and form in the changing American context. How these ideas are being transformed in today's globalized world.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Beischer, T. (PI)

CEE 32V: Architectural Design Lecture Series Course

This seminar is a companion to the Spring Architecture and Landscape Architecture Lecture Series. Students will converse with lecturers before the lectures, attend the lecture, and prepare short documents (written, graphic, exploratory) for two of the lectures. The four course meeting dates will correspond with the lecture dates TBD. The meeting times are 4:30 PM -5:30 PM for the seminar and 6:30 - 7:45 for the lecture.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: Barton, J. (PI)

CEE 33B: Japanese Modern Architecture

This seminar will examine Japanese architecture and theory since 1900. Through a combination of case studies, readings, and chronological overview, students will develop an in-depth understanding of the aesthetic, expression of construction, structural dynamics, material choices, and philosophical viewpoints that impact Japanese modern and contemporary architectural design. Through lectures, class discussions, a series of weekly writing assignments, and a longer paper and presentation, students will develop the tools to analyze and understand Japanese design of today.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

CEE 33C: Housing Visions

This course provides an introduction to American Housing practices, spanning from the Industrial Age to the present. Students will examine a range of projects that have aspired to a range of social, economic and/or environmental visions. While learning about housing typologies, students will also evaluate the ethical role that housing plays within society. The course focuses on the tactical potentials of housing, whether it is to provide a strong community, solve crisis situations, integrate social services, or encourage socio-economic mixture. Students will learn housing design principles and organizational strategies, and the impact of design on the urban environment. They will discuss themes of shared spaces and defensible spaces; and how design can accommodate the evolving demographics and culture of this country. For example, how can housing design address the changing relationship between living and working? What is the role of housing and ownership in economic mobility? These is more »
This course provides an introduction to American Housing practices, spanning from the Industrial Age to the present. Students will examine a range of projects that have aspired to a range of social, economic and/or environmental visions. While learning about housing typologies, students will also evaluate the ethical role that housing plays within society. The course focuses on the tactical potentials of housing, whether it is to provide a strong community, solve crisis situations, integrate social services, or encourage socio-economic mixture. Students will learn housing design principles and organizational strategies, and the impact of design on the urban environment. They will discuss themes of shared spaces and defensible spaces; and how design can accommodate the evolving demographics and culture of this country. For example, how can housing design address the changing relationship between living and working? What is the role of housing and ownership in economic mobility? These issues will be discussed within the context the changing composition of the American population and economy. n nThis course will be primarily discussion-based, using slideshows, readings and field trips as a departure points for student-generated conversations. Each student will be asked to lead a class discussion based on his/her research topic. Students will evaluate projects, identifying which aspects of the initial housing visions were realized, which did not, and why. Eventually, students might identify factors that lead to ¿successful¿ projects, and/or formulate new approaches that can strengthen or redefine the progressive role of housing: one inclusive of the complex social, economic, and ethical dimensions of design.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Choe, B. (PI)

CEE 70Q: The Food, Water, and Waste Nexus

This course will explore the connections between water access, fecal waste management, and food safety and provision in low- and middle-income countries. The interconnections between food, water, and waste will be discussed as it relates to human health and well-being. Topics that will be covered in the course include 1) farm to fork contamination pathways of food 2) food hygiene practices and barriers to implementation 3) waste water reuse practices 4) management of water for multiple uses 5) potential impact climate change may have on the connections of these systems. The students in the course will undertake individual research that explores the connections between these systems and identifies potential strategies to improve human health and well-being.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Harris, A. (PI)
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