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1 - 10 of 235 results for: SOC

SOC 1: Introduction to Sociology at Stanford

This course to get students to think like a sociologist; to use core concepts and theories from the field of sociology to make sense of the most pressing issues of our time: race and ethnicity; gender and sexuality; family; education; social class and economic inequality; social connectedness; social movements; and immigration. The course will draw heavily on the research and writing of Stanford¿s own sociologist.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

SOC 2: Social Psychology: Self and Society

Why do people behave the way they do? This fundamental question drives social psychology, a field that bridges psychology and sociology. This course surveys social psychological research on a wide variety of topics including conformity, morality, respect, generosity, identity, and prejudice, giving students a deeper understanding of the causal architecture of the social world.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

SOC 14N: Inequality in American Society

An overview of the major forms of inequality in American society, their causes and consequences. Special attention will devoted to to public policy associated with inequality.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Snipp, C. (PI)

SOC 15N: The Transformation of Socialist Societies

Preference to freshmen. The impact of societal organization on the lives of ordinary people in socialist societies and in the new societies arising through the processes of political, economic, and social transformation. Do the concepts of democratization and marketization suffice to characterize ongoing changes? Enrollment limited to 16.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-GlobalCom | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

SOC 16N: African Americans and Social Movements (AFRICAAM 16N, CSRE 16N)

Theory and research on African Americans' roles in post-Civil Rights, US social movements. Topics include women¿s right, LGBT rights, environmental movement, and contemporary political conservativism.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

SOC 20N: What counts as "race," and why?

Preference to freshmen. Seminar discussion of how race is conceptualized and how categorizations are determined across a range of disciplines and institutions in U.S. society. Course materials survey approaches from history, demography, law, sociology, psychology, genetics, and medicine. Students will read original social science research, learn to conduct and analyze in-depth interviews, and use library resources to support legal/archival case studies.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

SOC 22N: The Roots of Social Protest

Preference to freshmen. The conditions under which social protest occurs and the emergence, success, and viability of contemporary social movements. Examples include women's civil rights, ecology, and antiwar and anti-globilization movements in the U.S. and elsewhere. Sociological theories to explain the timing, location, and causes of mobilization; how researchers evaluate these theories. Comparison of tactics, trajectories, and outcomes.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Olzak, S. (PI)

SOC 24N: Themes in Political and Historical Sociology: The Political Party

This class focuses on the political party and on the different scholarly perspectives from which it has been studied. We will study these perspectives analytically¿to find the main elements that characterize them¿and historically¿to understand how the party has operated in different contexts and how scholarly interpretations have changed in time. The emphasis on the party requires a contextualization of two processes that have shaped the functioning of the institutions of the state in the last decades¿one operating below the state and the other operating abovenFrom below the state, the fragmentation of interests has been challenging the traditional identities that used to be embedded in the party. From above, international economic processes have been undermining the role of the state, and thus of the party, as the main vehicle for bringing grievances into the political arena. Thus, part of the agenda of the party is dominated by the activities of organized social movements that only partially follow traditional cleavages (class, status, race, ethnicity, urban/rural), while another part is dominated by multinational firms and banks that only partially represent national interests. Yet, to the extent that the institutions of the state remain relevant, the political party remains a powerful and significant actor of Modern democracies. The fundamental question of this class is to understand the way in which the party continues to shape the functioning of the state.n We will approach this question analytically and historically. Analytically, we will read through various definitions of what a party is. The aim is not to arrive at a ¿correct¿ definition of the party (there is not such a thing!) but to sharpen the differences between the several approaches. Historically, we will study the party in action with the goal of understanding the perspective from which the party was portrayed. Together, in this double exercise you will learn the tools of the trade, so to speak, of political sociology.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

SOC 45Q: Understanding Race and Ethnicity in American Society (CSRE 45Q)

Preference to sophomores. Historical overview of race in America, race and violence, race and socioeconomic well-being, and the future of race relations in America. Enrollment limited to 16.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-AmerCul, WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Snipp, C. (PI)

SOC 46N: Race, Ethnic, and National Identities: Imagined Communities

Preference to freshmen. How new identities are created and legitimated. What does it mean to try on a different identity? National groups and ethnic groups are so large that one individual can know only an infinitesimal fraction of other group members. What explains the seeming coherence of groups? If identities are a product of the imagination, why are people willing to fight and die for them? Enrollment limited to 16.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
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