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1 - 10 of 217 results for: PSYCH

PSYCH 1: Introduction to Psychology

Human behavior and mental processes including the nervous system, consciousness, learning, memory, development, emotion, psychopathology, interpersonal process, society, and culture. Current research.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

PSYCH 4N: Predicting aggregate choice

Preference to freshmen. Is prediction of group choice possible and how can it be done? This course is ideal for students that would like to extend predictions about individual choice to group choice, and who plan to apply this knowledge to future research.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Knutson, B. (PI)

PSYCH 7Q: Language Understanding by Children and Adults

How do we first learn to find meaning in strings of speech sounds? Understanding spoken language requires the rapid integration of acoustic information with linguistic knowledge and with conceptual knowledge based on experience with how things happen in the world. Topics include research on early development of language understanding and laboratory methods of how young children make sense of speech. Observations of preschool children and visits to Stanford laboratories. Might be repeatable for credit.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

PSYCH 8N: The New Longevity

Adult development from the perspective of life-span theory -- a conceptual framework that views development as a series of adaptations to physical, societal and individual resources and constraints. Students will learn about demographic and medical changes, ways that individuals typically change socially, emotionally and cognitively as they move through adulthood. An understanding of the conceptual foundations of the life-span approach and place aging of young people today in historical context.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

PSYCH 9N: Reading the Brain: the Scientific, Ethical, and Legal Implications of Brain Imaging

It's hard to pick up a newspaper without seeing a story that involves brain imaging, from research on psychological disorders to its use for lie detection or "neuromarketing". The methods are indeed very powerful, but many of the claims seen in the press are results of overly strong interpretations. In this course, you will learn to evaluate claims based on brain imaging research. We will also explore the deeper ethical and philosophical issues that arise from our ability to peer into our own brains in action. The course will start by discussing how to understand and interpret the findings of brain imaging research. We will discuss how new statistical methods provide the ability to accurately predict thoughts and behaviors from brain images. We will explore how this research has the potential to change our concepts of the self, personal responsibility and free will. We will also discuss the ethics of brain imaging, such as how the ability to detect thoughts relates to personal privacy and mental illness. Finally, we will discuss the legal implications of these techniques, such as their use in lie detection or as evidence against legal culpability.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-ER, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Poldrack, R. (PI)

PSYCH 10: Introduction to Statistical Methods: Precalculus (STATS 60, STATS 160)

Techniques for organizing data, computing, and interpreting measures of central tendency, variability, and association. Estimation, confidence intervals, tests of hypotheses, t-tests, correlation, and regression. Possible topics: analysis of variance and chi-square tests, computer statistical packages.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Math, WAY-AQR, WAY-FR | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

PSYCH 10N: Kids, Culture, and Poverty: From Biology to Social Action

Years before they set foot in school, children growing up in poor families begin to diverge from children in richer families in their trajectories of cognitive and language growth. These differences have powerful and enduring consequences for the health, well-being, educational success, and longevity of individuals, as well as for the future prosperity of the societies in which children become adults. Early childhood is a time of both enormous promise and considerable risk, and parents in different cultures have widely differing practices and beliefs about their role in enabling children to avoid risk and achieve their potential. In this seminar we will evaluate evidence from the biological and social sciences showing how positive and negative experiences in infancy have profound and enduring effects on early brain architecture, with cascading consequences for later development in childhood and adulthood. We will also consider the challenges of designing more effective programs and social policies to provide support for families in diverse cultural contexts, with the goal of helping more children to reach their full potential.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Fernald, A. (PI)

PSYCH 11N: Origin of Mental Life

Preference to freshmen. Mental life in infancy; how thinking originates. How do babies construe the objects, events, people, and language that surround them? Recent advances in psychological theory, hypotheses, and evidence about how the infant human mind develops.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

PSYCH 12N: Self Theories

Preference to freshmen. The impact of people's belief in a growing versus fixed self on their motivation and performance in school, business, sports, and relationships. How such theories develop and can be changed.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Dweck, C. (PI)

PSYCH 13N: Emotion Regulation

This seminar provides a selective overview of the scientific study of emotion regulation. Topics include: theoretical foundations, cognitive consequences, developmental approaches, personality processes and individual differences, and clinical and treatment implications. Our focus is on interesting, experimentally tractable ideas. Meetings will be discussion based.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
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