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1 - 10 of 128 results for: GS

GS 1A: Introduction to Geology: The Physical Science of the Earth

For non-majors or prospective majors in the Earth Sciences. Lectures, hands-on laboratories, in-class activities, and one field trip. Focus is on the physical and chemical processes of heat and mass transfer within the earth and its fluid envelopes, including deep-earth, crustal, surface, and atmospheric processes. Topics include plate tectonics, the cycling and formation of different types of rocks, and how geologists use rocks to understand Earth's history. Only one of GS 1A, 1B, or 1C may be taken for credit.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-AQR, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

GS 1B: Introduction to Geology

For non-majors and prospective majors or minors in the Earth Sciences. Introduction to physical geology. Lectures and lab exercises focus on understanding the dynamics of Earth¿s ongoing physical and chemical processes. Major themes include plate tectonics, the rock cycle, the hydrologic cycle, and mineral resources. We will employ local CA geology, current events, and the state-of-the-art to drive discussions on landscapes, hazards, and economics. Only one of GS 1A, 1B, or 1C may be taken for credit. Recommended: high school chemistry.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-FR, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

GS 1C: Introduction to Geology: Dynamic Earth

For non-majors or prospective majors in the Earth Sciences. Integrated lecture-lab includes hands-on activities and local field trips. Focus is on reading the dynamic geological landscape, with an emphasis on California-primarily Bay Area-geology. Topics include plate tectonics, earthquakes and volcanoes, Earth materials, geologic time, stream processes, and climate change over geologic time. Only one of GS 1A, 1B, or 1C may be taken for credit.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

GS 4: How to Build and Maintain a Habitable Planet: An Introduction to Earth System History (EARTHSYS 4)

Introduction to the history of the Earth, with a focus on processes that maintain or threaten habitability. Principles of stratigraphy, correlation, the geological timescale, the history of biodiversity, and the interpretation of fossils. The use of data from sedimentary geology, geochemistry, and paleontology to test theories for critical events in Earth history such as mass extinctions. One half-day field trip.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

GS 5: Living on the Edge (EARTH 15)

A weekend field trip along the Pacific Coast. Tour local beaches, geology, and landforms with expert guides from the Department of Geological and Environmental Sciences. Enjoy a BBQ dinner and stay overnight in cabins along the Santa Cruz coast. Get to know faculty and graduate students in the Earth Sciences. Requirements: Two campus meeting and weekend field trip to Pacific Coast. Enrollment limited to 25. Freshman have first choice.
Terms: Aut, Spr | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

GS 8: Oceanography: An Introduction to the Marine Environment

For non-majors and earth science and environmental majors. Topics: topography and geology of the sea floor; evolution of ocean basins; circulation of ocean and atmosphere; nature of sea water, waves, and tides; and the history of the major ocean basins. The interface between continents and ocean basins, emphasizing estuaries, beaches, and continental shelves with California margin examples. Relationships among the distribution of inorganic constituents, ocean circulation, biologic productivity, and marine environments from deep sea to the coast. One-day field trip to measure and analyze waves and currents.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

GS 12SC: Environmental and Geological Field Studies in the Rocky Mountains (EARTHSYS 12SC, ESS 12SC)

The ecologically and geologically diverse Rocky Mountain area is being strongly impacted by changing land use patterns, global and regional environmental change, and societal demands for energy and natural resources. This field program emphasizes coupled environmental and geological problems in the Rocky Mountains, covering a broad range of topics including the geologic origin of the American West from three billion years ago to the present; paleoclimatology and the glacial history of this mountainous region; the long- and short-term carbon cycle and global climate change; and environmental issues in the American West related to changing land-use patterns and increased demand for its abundant natural resources. In addition to the science aspects of this course we will also investigate the unique western culture of the area particularly in regards to modern ranching and outfitting in the American West. These broad topics are integrated into a coherent field-study as we examine earth/ environmental science-related questions in three different settings: 1) the three-billion-year-old rocks and the modern glaciers of the Wind River Mountains of Wyoming; 2) the sediments in the adjacent Wind River basin that host abundant gas and oil reserves and also contain the long-term climate history of this region; and 3) the volcanic center of Yellowstone National Park and the mountainous region of Teton National Park. Students will complete six assignments based upon field exercises, working in small groups to analyze data and prepare reports and maps. Lectures will be held in the field prior to and after fieldwork. Note: This course involves one week of backpacking in the Wind Rivers and hiking while staying in cabins near Jackson Hole, Wyoming. Students must arrive in Salt Lake City on Tuesday, September 6. (Hotel lodging will be provided for the night of September 6, and thereafter students will travel as a Sophomore College group.) We will return to campus on Friday, September 23. Sophomore College Course: Application required, due noon, April 5, 2016. Apply at http://soco.stanford.edu.
Terms: Sum | Units: 2 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

GS 14: Our National Parks (EARTH 14, EARTH 114A, GS 114A)

Explore the history and natural science of three national parks proximal to Stanford. Under the guidance of instructors, students will work in teams to learn about chosen aspects of these parks, develop dynamic self-guided tours for public consumption, and implement (and publish) these tours using the XibitEd app for iPhones. Students will learn how to present their findings to a general, non-scientific audience, delineate physical locations at which storytelling will take place through the XibitEd system, and create and configure the content for the system. The course will culminate in the publishing of the experiential learning tours, as well as a weekend-long field trip to the Pinnacles National Park
Terms: Win | Units: 2 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

GS 38N: The Worst Journey in the World: The Science, Literature, and History of Polar Exploration (EARTHSYS 38N, ESS 38N)

This course examines the motivations and experiences of polar explorers under the harshest conditions on Earth, as well as the chronicles of their explorations and hardships, dating to the 1500s for the Arctic and the 1700s for the Antarctic. Materials include The Worst Journey in the World by Aspley Cherry-Garrard who in 1911 participated in a midwinter Antarctic sledging trip to recover emperor penguin eggs. Optional field trip into the high Sierra in March.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Dunbar, R. (PI)

GS 40N: Diamonds

Preference to freshmen. Topics include the history of diamonds as gemstones, prospecting and mining, and their often tragic politics. How diamond samples provide clues for geologists to understand the Earth's deep interior and the origins of the solar system. Diamond's unique materials properties and efforts in synthesizing diamonds.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
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