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1 - 10 of 75 results for: GERMAN

GERMAN 15SC: Berlin: A City and its Immigrants -- German Immersion

We designed this course for students who have some German, and who want to jump-start their language acquisition through an intense and immersive experience. If you have taken two or three quarters of German, or if you took German in high school, this course will allow you to dramatically improve your proficiency, all the while immersing you in German music, film, literature and journalism. Our main thematic focus will the city of Berlin, and the many groups that have migrated there over the years: their experiences and artistic creations, from concertos to hip hop videos, from poems to comic books, and from classic films to viral videos will be our guides through both a fascinating city and a fascinating language. Sophomore College course: Applications required, March 1 - April 5, 2016. Apply at http://soco.stanford.edu
Terms: Sum | Units: 2 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

GERMAN 41N: Inventing Modern Theatre: Georg B├╝chner and Frank Wedekind (TAPS 41N)

The German writers Georg Büchner (1813-1837) and Frank Wedekind (1864-1918). Many of the most important theater and film directors of the last century, including Max Reinhardt, G. W. Pabst, Orson Welles, Robert Wilson, and Werner Herzog, have wrestled with their works, as have composers and writers from Alban Berg and Bertolt Brecht through Christa Wolf and Thalia Field. Rock artists as diverse as Tom Waits, Lou Reed, Duncan Sheik, and Metallica have recently rediscovered their urgency. Reading these works in translation and examining artistic creations they inspired. Classroom discussions and written responses; students also rehearse and present in-class performances of excerpts from the plays. The aim of these performances is not to produce polished stagings but to creatively engage with the texts and their interpretive traditions. No previous theatrical experience required.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-CE | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

GERMAN 45: Crimes Against Humanity (HISTORY 4S)

What is a crime against humanity and how can it be punished? Starting with the Nuremberg Trials, this seminar will consider how the juridical category of crimes against humanity came into existence and has evolved over the past half century. Thinking through core questions posed by Hannah Arendt, we will consider how crimes against humanity are to be understood in the context of modern jurisprudence, who perpetrates such crimes, and what relationship exists between crimes against humanity and modernity. Priority given to history majors and minors.
Terms: Spr, offered once only | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Huneke, S. (PI)

GERMAN 80N: Modern Conservatives

How do conservatives respond to the modern world? How do they find a balance between tradition and freedom, or between stability and change? This seminar will examine selections from some conservative and some classically liberal writers that address these questions. At the center of the course are thinkers who left Germany and Austria before the Second World War: Friedrich Hayek, Leo Strauss and Hannah Arendt. We will also look at earlier European writers, such Edmund Burke and Friedrich Nietzsche, as well as some recent American thinkers. Taught in English.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

GERMAN 88: Germany in 5 Words

This course explores German history, culture and politics by tracing five (largely untranslatable) words and exploring the debates they have engendered in Germany over the past 200 years. This course is intended as preparation for students wishing to spend a quarter at the Bing Overseas Studies campus in Berlin, but is open to everyone. Taught in English.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

GERMAN 88Q: Gateways to the World: Germany in 5 Words

This course explores German history, culture and politics by tracing five (largely untranslatable) words and exploring the debates they have engendered in Germany over the past 200 years. This course is intended as preparation for students wishing to spend a quarter at the Bing Overseas Studies campus in Berlin, but is open to everyone. Preference to Sophomores. Taught in English.
Terms: not given next year | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

GERMAN 103N: Why Humans Matter

We consider various mythic and religious conceptions of the human from antiquity to Renaissance humanism, key documents of modern secular humanism, and literary works that raise probing questions about humanity. What is peculiar to humans against the foil of animal life forms? Is there a human nature at all, or perhaps a human calling, that might transcend differences among people? Contemporary debates about the limits of the human species, the aspiration to overcome such limits through science, and ecological challenges to traditional views of humans' place in the world.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Dornbach, M. (PI)

GERMAN 104: Resistance Writings in Nazi Germany

This course focuses on documents generated by nonmilitary resistance groups during the period of National Socialism. Letters, essays, diaries, and statements on ethics from the Bonhoeffer and Scholl families form the core of the readings. The resistance novel, Every Man Dies Alone, is also included. Texts will be read as historical documents, reflections of German thought, statements of conscience, attempts to maintain normal relationships with others in the face of great risk, as poetic works, and as guides for the development of an ethical life. Taught in English.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-ER | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

GERMAN 105: Going Medieval: Introduction to Freiburg, Germany, and its Surrounding Region (DLCL 105)

This course offers an introduction to materials that are pertinent to the BOSP summer seminar "Going Medieval" offered in summer 2015. It is a required course for participants of the seminar.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

GERMAN 113N: Theatre and Politics

The theatre is a public forum where politics is both represented and enacted. In this seminar we will examine four theatrical artists who have wrestled with urgent political questions of their time and ours: William Shakespeare, Georg Büchner, Bertolt Brecht, and Anna Deveare Smith. nnQuestions we will consider include: How does Shakespeare¿s Hamlet raise questions about a sovereign¿s right to rule? What might a play such as Büchner¿s Danton¿s Death¿set during the one of the bloodiest periods of the French Revolution¿suggest about the relationship between terrorism and reason? What does a musical such as Brecht¿s Threepenny Opera demonstrate about strategies of mass manipulation? And how could a performance piece such as Smith¿s Twilight: Los Angeles help us better understand the dynamics of police brutality and urban riot? nnIn this course, we will read seven plays, delve into their cultural contexts, and watch film and live versions of them, including field trips to at area theatres. We will also try our hand at staging some scenes in class, in order to get a better sense of the sorts of choices these plays require. Your assignments will include short papers and regular postings on an online discussion board. All readings and discussions will be in English, and no prior theatrical experience is necessary.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Smith, M. (PI)
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