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1 - 10 of 148 results for: ENGLISH

ENGLISH 1: CSN Undergraduate Colloquium (DLCL 1)

This colloquium is intended for undergraduates who are interested in the history and theory of the novel, and who would like to attend the Center for the Study of the Novel's (CSN) annual conference. Before the conference, students will meet with CSN's graduate student staff, to read and discuss a small number of key texts by participating scholars, whose presentations students will then attend. After the conference, the colloquium will meet again, to discuss both the readings and conference papers, and explore their broader implications for the study of the novel. Attendance at both meetings of the colloquium, and at least one panel at the conference, is required for course credit.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: McGurl, M. (PI)

ENGLISH 1D: Dickens Book Club

Through the academic year, we will read one Dickens novel, one number a week for 19 weeks, as the Victorians would have done as they read the serialized novel over the course of 19 months. The group gets together once a week for an hour and a half to discuss each number, to look carefully at the pattern that the author is weaving, to guess, as the Victorians would have done, what might be coming next, and to investigate the Victorian world Dickens presents. We look carefully at themes, characters, metaphorical patterns, and scenes that form Dickens' literary world, and spend increasing time evaluating the critique that Dickens levels at Victorian life. The weekly gatherings are casual; the discussion is lively and pointed.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: Paulson, L. (PI)

ENGLISH 8SI: Practical Criticism

This course revives a pivotal critical work of the last century, "Practical Criticism" by I.A. Richards, in a seminar that will mirror the conditions of the literary experiment that inspired the book. In the experiment, extremely good and extremely bad poems whose authors range from John Donne and D.H. Lawrence to obscure 20th-century poets were put unsigned before a large and able audience. The comments they wrote at leisure give a stereoscopic view of the poem. We will examine the book, which includes the poems, the scathing anonymous critiques by Richards Cambridge undergraduates, and Richards theory of our psychology of reading.
Terms: Spr | Units: 2 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: Greene, R. (PI)

ENGLISH 9CE: Creative Expression in Writing

Primary focus on giving students a skill set to tap into their own creativity. Opportunities for students to explore their creative strengths, develop a vocabulary with which to discuss their own creativity, and experiment with the craft and adventure of their own writing. Students will come out of the course strengthened in their ability to identify and pursue their own creative interests. For undergrads only.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ENGLISH 9CT: Special Topics in Creative Expression

Focus on a particular topic or process of creative expression. Primary focus on giving students a skill set to tap into their own creativity. Opportunities for students to explore their creative strengths, develop a vocabulary with which to discuss their own creativity, and experiment with the craft and adventure of their own writing. Students will come out of the course strengthened in their ability to identify and pursue their own creative interests. For undergrads only
Terms: Win, Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ENGLISH 10A: Introduction to English I: Medieval and Renaissance Lives

The course traces the development and transformation of key literary concepts and forms from c. 900 to c. 1630. We examine major canonical texts to discover something of the lives of those who wrote and read these works. We shall explore how love and fear may be the key motivations for all human actions.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ENGLISH 10B: Introduction to English I: Poetics and Politics in Medieval and Renaissance Literature

From the 14th to the 17th centuries, how are literary developments involved with historical events and social conditions? Discussion of how literature works as a force in culture, not only a reflection of other forces. Readings from Chaucer, More, Wyatt, Spenser, Kyd, Shakespeare, Donne, Milton and Cavendish.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ENGLISH 11A: Introduction to English II: From Milton to the Romantics

Major moments in English literary history, from John Milton's Paradise Lost to John Keats's Hyperion. The trajectory involves a variety of literary forms, including Augustan satire, the illuminated poetry of William Blake's handcrafted books, the historical novel invented by Sir Walter Scott, the society novel of Jane Austen, and William Wordsworth's epic of psychological and artistic development. Literary texts will be studied in the context of important cultural influences, among them civil war, religious dissent, revolution, commercialization, colonialism, and industrialization.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ENGLISH 11B: Introduction to English II: American Literature and Culture to 1855 (AMSTUD 150)

(Formerly English 23/123). A survey of early American writings, including sermons, poetry, captivity and slave narratives, essays, autobiography, and fiction, from the colonial era to the eve of the Civil War.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-AmerCul, WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ENGLISH 12A: Introduction to English III: Introduction to African American Literature (AFRICAAM 43, AMSTUD 12A)

(Formerly English 43/143). In his bold study, What Was African American Literature?, Kenneth Warren defines African American literature as a late nineteenth- to mid-twentieth-century response to the nation's Jim Crow segregated order. But in the aftermath of the Jim Crow era and the Civil Rights movement, can critics still speak, coherently, of "African American literature"? And how does this political conception of African American literary production compare with accounts grounded in black language and culture? Taking up Warren's intervention, this course will explore African American literature from its earliest manifestations in the spirituals and slave narratives to texts composed at the height of desegregation and decolonization struggles at mid-century and beyond.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-AmerCul, WAY-A-II, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
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