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1 - 10 of 154 results for: ECON

ECON 1: Principles of Economics

The economic way of thinking and the functioning of a modern market economy. The behavior of consumers and firms. Markets for goods and inputs. Analysis of macroeconomic variables: output, employment, inflation, interest rate. Determination of long-run growth and short-term fluctuations. The role of government: regulation, monetary, and fiscal policy.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ECON 1V: Principles of Economics

The economic way of thinking and the functioning of a modern market economy. The behavior of consumers and firms. Markets for goods and inputs. Analysis of macroeconomic variables: output, employment, inflation, interest rate. Determination of long-run growth and short-term fluctuations. The role of government: regulation, monetary, and fiscal policy.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ECON 5: Economics in the News

Each week a different Econ faculty member will discuss recent, exciting developments in their field. A particular emphasis will be how economics informs policy debates. The course will provide a preview of upper division courses and research opportunities in economics. Prerequisite: Econ 1, Econ 1A or 1B.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

ECON 10: Microcosm of Silicon Valley and Wall Street

Seminar in applied economics with focus on the microcosm of Silicon Valley, how growth companies are originated, managed and financed from start-up to IPO. Round-table discussion format. Applicable to those students with an interest in technology company formation, growth and finance including interaction with Wall Street. Enrollment limited to 10 juniors, seniors and co-term students.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: Shanahan, T. (PI)

ECON 11N: Understanding the Welfare System

Welfare reform passed by the Federal Government in 1996 heralded a dramatic step in how our nation designs and operates its programs that support poor families. The centerpiece of this legislation known as 'devolution' transferred much responsibility for these programs to the states. States had their first opportunity since the 'war on poverty' of the 1960s to undertake radical changes in setting up their public assistance programs. Recently, many of the reforms instituted in the 1990s are being hotly debated and in some aspects reversed. What flexibility did the states receive under welfare reform, and what considerations are relevant in exercising this flexibility? What selections have states made, and how are their programs and those of the federal government likely to evolve in the future? This seminar will address these questions, exploring how reforms changed welfare and who has been affected by these changes. In addition to covering the patchwork of different programs that currently constitute America's social safety net, the seminar will also scrutinize the makeup and trends in government spending and how our nation defines poverty and eligibility for income support. Moreover, the discussion will illustrate the role that economics plays in assessing the effectiveness of anti-poverty programs and the consequences on families' behavior. Students will participate in a project in which they develop their own recommendations for devising a safety net for poor families in America.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: MaCurdy, T. (PI)

ECON 12: Investment Reflections from a Hedge Fund Career: Mindset & Meditation as Competitive Advantage

The class will attempt to relate the most important sources of competitive advantage during the instructor's fifteen years co-managing Scout Capital, a long-short hedge fund. The class will learn Scout's investment framework, in order to apply it to real historical cases. The cases are designed both to illustrate the investment framework in action, and to enable the student to experience the perceptual difficulties that confront professional investors. The class will discuss techniques for managing the mental fog that plagues most investors, with an emphasis on meditation. Students should be prepared to commit 15 minutes per day, every day, to meditation practice during the term of the course. Each class will contain a short guided meditation, and a short group reflection on students' meditation experiences.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

ECON 13SC: Economic Policies of the Presidential Candidates

In nearly all polls, American voters rank the economy as one of their most important concerns. In the presidential election, full debates are dedicated to questions of economic policy. In this course, we will delve deeply into economic policy issues to understand options for government intervention and possible outcomes. Focus will be on the economic issues, not on the political aspects of the campaign. Specific areas of interest will be taxation, budget, entitlement programs, economic regulation and competition policy, trade, demography, income inequality, and monetary policy. We expect to incorporate timely and salient economic issues as they arise during the course of the campaign. The course will include four days of meetings in Washington, DC with economic policy analysts. Students will be expected to write a short paper and make an oral presentation to the class. A wide range of topics will be acceptable, including those directly related to campaign issues as well as other long-term economic issues facing the country. Sophomore College course, applications required by deadline April 5, 2016. Apply at http://soco.stanford.edu.
Terms: Sum | Units: 2 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ECON 17N: Energy, the Environment, and the Economy

Examines the intimate relationship between environmental quality and the production and consumption of energy. Assesses the economics efficiency and political economy implications of a number of current topics in energy and environmental economics. Topics include: the economic theory of exhaustible resources, Greenhouse Gas Emissions (GHG) control (cap and trade mechanisms and carbon fees), GHG emissions offsets, the Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR), the "smart" transmission grid for electricity, nuclear energy and nuclear waste, the real cost of renewable energy, natural gas and coal-fired electricity production, the global coal and natural gas markets, Corporate Average Fuel Efficiency (CAFE) and Low-Carbon Fuel Standards (LCFS), Energy Efficiency Investments and Demand Response, and Carbon Capture and Sequestration (CCS). For all topics, there will be reading to explain the economics and engineering behind the topic and class discussion to clarify and elaborate on this interaction.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Wolak, F. (PI)

ECON 18A: The Washington Debate About American Competitiveness

One of the central challenges for policymakers is how to make sure the United States remains the world's strongest economy and continues to create good paying jobs. Discusses what the proper role of government should be when it comes to our economy by exploring the history of American economic thought dating back to Alexander Hamilton. Considers the perspective of classical economists, Keynsian economists, and economists identifying themselves as part of the innovation school of economics. Examines various policy alternatives concerning taxes, regulations, immigration, and investment that can foster economic growth.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: Khanna, R. (PI)

ECON 18B: Silicon Valley Leaders Take on America's Economic Future

The academic debates about economic policy often miss the perspective of real word business leaders who are navigating a complex, global economy. In this class, we will hear from technology leaders and CEOS from many prominent Silicon Valley companies. They will offer their take on repatriation, immigration, trade issues, and tax reform. We will explore whether there is a disconnect between Congress and Silicon Valley business leaders, and if so, how we can bridge that divide.
Terms: Win | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: Khanna, R. (PI)
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