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1 - 10 of 171 results for: CSRE

CSRE 1A: Meet the Profs: Conversations on Race and Ethnicity

This course meets once a week for one hour, over lunch (provided). Students will meet with CSRE faculty who will share their work, their life stories, their reasons for believing that race and ethnicity are of central concern to all members of our society. Diverse fields will be represented: sociology, history, literature, psychology and others. The course may be taken for either one or two units. Open to freshmen and sophomores only.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 1-2 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

CSRE 5C: Human Trafficking: Historical, Legal, and Medical Perspectives (EMED 5C, FEMGEN 5C, HISTORY 5C, HUMBIO 178T)

(Same as History 105C. History majors and others taking 5 units, enroll in 105C.) Interdisciplinary approach to understanding the extent and complexity of the global phenomenon of human trafficking, especially for forced prostitution and labor exploitation, focusing on human rights violations and remedies. Provides a historical context for the development and spread of human trafficking. Analyzes the current international and domestic legal and policy frameworks to combat trafficking and evaluates their practical implementation. Examines the medical, psychological, and public health issues involved. Uses problem-based learning. Students interested in service learning should consult with the instructor and will enroll in an additional course.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

CSRE 8: Conjure and Manifest: Building a Sustainable Artistic Practice (AFRICAAM 8)

In this course, student-artists spend time investigating their artistic practice as a framework for promoting power, wellness, and creativity; and as a tangible means for navigating the first steps of their artistic careers. We spend time critically examining the philosophies and works of Black artists including James Baldwin, Octavia Butler, RZA (Wu-Tang Clan) and Nayyirah Waheed, in order to explore new visions for the artist as activist, as futurist and as spiritual healer. We then use a mixture of these ideas and our own¿along with meditation and mindfulness experiences¿to begin conjuring and manifesting intimate relationships with our art practice and ourselves. Student-artists will develop creative confidence, formulate game plans for success, and begin to find balance between the uncertainty and ultimate freedom that life as an artist can bring.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Grading: Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Holt, A. (PI)

CSRE 11W: Service-Learning Workshop on Issues of Education Equity (HISTORY 11W)

Introduces students to a variety of issues at stake in the public education of at-risk high school youth in California. Participants will hear from some of the leading faculty in the School of Education as well as the Departments of Psychology, Sociology, and others, who will share perspectives on the problems and challenges of educating a diverse student body in the state's public school system. The service-learning component of the workshop is a mentoring project (Stanford Students for Educational Equity) with junior class history students from East Palo Alto Academy High School, a Stanford charter school.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

CSRE 13: Digital Humanities and African American History Black History in the Age of the Digital Database (URBANST 103)

The focus of this workshop is on the social and cultural histories and present conditions relating to social movements and the role of leaders and heroes in urban settings. The workshop seeks to foster historical consciousness of past struggles for justice through collective action as well as to introduce students to a diverse range of leaders of contemporary social justice movements. Additionally, as an underpinning concept, the course explores the changing meaning and importance of social and cultural heroes through history, literature, and music. Workshop activities will divided between sessions with guest speakers and classes held to discuss background concepts and material.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: Brown, C. (PI)

CSRE 14N: Growing Up Bilingual (CHILATST 14N, EDUC 114N)

This course is a Freshman Introductory Seminar that has as its purpose introducing students to the sociolinguistic study of bilingualism by focusing on bilingual communities in this country and on bilingual individuals who use two languages in their everyday lives. Much attention is given to the history, significance, and consequences of language contact in the United States. The course focuses on the experiences of long-term US minority populations as well as that of recent immigrants.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Valdes, G. (PI)

CSRE 15N: Imagining India: Art, Culture, Politics in Modern India (COMPLIT 14N, FEMGEN 14N, TAPS 14N)

This course explores history via cultural responses in modern India. We will examine a range of fiction, film and drama to consider the ways in which India emerges through its cultural productions. The course will consider key historical events such as the partition of the subcontinent, independence from British rule, Green Revolution, Emergency, liberalization of the Indian economy, among others. We will reflect on epochal historical moments by means of artisticnresponses to these events. For example, Ritwik Ghatak's experimental cinema intervenes into debates around the Bengal partition; Rohinton Mistry's novel, A Fine Balance grapples with the suspension of civil liberties during the emergency between 1975-77; Rahul Varma's play Bhopal reflects on the Bhopal gas tragedy, considered the world's worst industrial disaster. Students willnread, view and reflect on the aesthetic and historical texts through their thoughtful engagement in class discussions and written e ssays. They will also have opportunities to imaginatively respond to these texts via short creative projects, which could range from poems, monologues, solo pieces, web installations, etc. Readings will also include Mahashweta Devi, Amitav Ghosh, Girish Karnad, Jhumpa Lahiri, Manjula Padmanabhan, Salman Rushdie, Aparna Sen, among others.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-A-II, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Menon, J. (PI)

CSRE 16A: Dynamic Australia: immigrant and indigenous experiences

How did modern Australian society take shape? Within this larger framework, several subsidiary questions will guide us: What have been the experiences of immigrants, of Aborigines and Torres Strait Islanders, and how have their relations evolved over time? To what degree has Australia been formed by successive waves of immigration? What has been the fate of the Aboriginal peoples? How have intergroup relations evolved since the start of colonialism in the late 18th century? What have been the elements of racial formation, and how have they changed over time? What does it mean to be Australian in the 21st century? How might the creative arts (e.g. music, literature, drama, painting, dance) help us understand Australian identities and intergroup dynamics? nnAs a course project, students are required to informally interview someone whose life history has involved large-scale displacement, voluntary or otherwise. This is intended as a means of sharpening awareness of migration as a feature of modern world history as articulated at the level of individuals and communities.nThis course is primarily intended for students enrolled in or waitlisted for the BOSP Summer Seminar in Sydney (June-July 2016). However, all participants will find it a wide-ranging introduction to Australian society and a case study in intergroup dynamics.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

CSRE 16N: African Americans and Social Movements (AFRICAAM 16N, SOC 16N)

Theory and research on African Americans' roles in post-Civil Rights, US social movements. Topics include women¿s right, LGBT rights, environmental movement, and contemporary political conservativism.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

CSRE 19N: "Land of Milk and Honey": Food, Justice, and Ethnic Identity in Jewish Culture (JEWISHST 19N, RELIGST 19N)

Food is an essential aspect of the human experience. The decisions and choices we make about food define who we have been, who we are now, and who we want to become. nnThis seminar examines Jewish culture and the food practices and traditions that have shaped and continue to shape it. Why has Jewish culture been centered around food practices? How have religious laws and rituals about food and food production shaped Jewish culture and vice versa? Dietary laws prescribe which animals are and are not "kosher" and what can be eaten with them, holidays are celebrated with traditional foods, and regional foods contribute to the formation of distinct Jewish ethnic identities. More recently, American Jews have begun to organize around issues of food justice, and joined the sustainability movement, adapting Jewish traditions about food production into their cause. What is the significance of animal welfare, environmental issues, and labor practices in Jewish culture?nnThis multi-disciplinary seminar explores the connection between food practices and ethnic and religious identity(ies), the history of the dietary laws and their multiple interpretations, the cultural significance of the phenomenal success of kosher certification in the U.S. food market, and the rise of the Jewish food justice movement. These issues raise a multitude of comparative questions, and you are encouraged to engage in research into other religious and ethnic food cultures. Course materials include: biblical and later religious, legal, and philosophical texts; cook-books (as cultural and historical sources); literature (both fiction and academic); films; news media, and food experts. We will visit an urban farming community (Urban Adamah) to learn from those involved in the Jewish sustainability movement.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
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