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1 - 10 of 222 results for: CS

CS 1C: Introduction to Computing at Stanford

For those with limited experience with computers or who want to learn more about Stanford's computing environment. Topics include: computer maintenance and security, computing resources, Internet privacy, and copyright law. One-hour lecture/demonstration in dormitory clusters prepared and administered weekly by the Resident Computer Consultant (RCC). Final project. Not a programming course.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: Smith, S. (PI)

CS 1U: Practical Unix

A practical introduction to using the Unix operating system with a focus on Linux command line skills. Class will consist of video tutorials and weekly hands-on lab sections. The time listed on AXESS is for the first week's logistical meeting only. Topics include: grep and regular expressions, ZSH, Vim and Emacs, basic and advanced GDB features, permissions, working with the file system, revision control, Unix utilities, environment customization, and using Python for shell scripts. Topics may be added, given sufficient interest. Course website: http://cs1u.stanford.edu
Terms: Aut, Spr | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

CS 2C: Introduction to Media Production

Sound, image and video editing techniques and applications, best practices and information regarding Stanford media support. Technical topics will cover Photoshop, iMovie and Garageband. Weekly pre-class online tutorials followed by weekly group work and peer critiques. Not a programming course, but will use computer multimedia applications heavily for editing.
Terms: Aut, Win | Units: 2 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: Scott, E. (PI)

CS 9: Problem-Solving for the CS Technical Interview

This course will prepare students to interview for software engineering and related internships and full-time positions in industry. Drawing on multiple sources of actual interview questions, students will learn key problem-solving strategies specific to the technical/coding interview. Students will be encouraged to synthesize information they have learned across different courses in the major. Emphasis will be on the oral and combination written-oral modes of communication common in coding interviews, but which are unfamiliar settings for problem solving for many students. Prerequisites: CS 106B or X.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

CS 22A: The Social & Economic Impact of Artificial Intelligence

Recent advances in computing may place us at the threshold of a unique turning point in human history. Soon we are likely to entrust management of our environment, economy, security, infrastructure, food production, healthcare, and to a large degree even our personal activities, to artificially intelligent computer systems. The prospect of "turning over the keys" to increasingly autonomous systems raises many complex and troubling questions. How will society respond as versatile robots and machine-learning systems displace an ever-expanding spectrum of blue- and white-collar workers? Will the benefits of this technological revolution be broadly distributed or accrue to a lucky few? How can we ensure that these systems respect our ethical principles when they make decisions at speeds and for rationales that exceed our ability to comprehend? What, if any, legal rights and responsibilities should we grant them? And should we regard them merely as sophisticated tools or as a newly emerging form of life? The goal of CS22 is to equip students with the intellectual tools, ethical foundation, and psychological framework to successfully navigate the coming age of intelligent machines.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: Kaplan, J. (PI)

CS 27: Literature and Social Online Learning (COMPLIT 239B, ENGLISH 239B)

Study, develop, and test new digital methods, games, apps, interactive social media uses to innovate how the humanities can engage and educate students and the public today. Exploring well-known literary texts, digital storytelling forms and literary communities online, students work individually and in interdisciplinary teams to develop innovative projects aimed at bringing literature to life. Tasks include literary role-plays on Twitter; researching existing digital pedagogy and literary projects, games, and apps; reading and coding challenges; collaborative social events mediated by new technology. Minimal prerequisites which vary for students in CS and the humanities; please check with instructors.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

CS 29N: Computational Decision Making

Although we make decisions every day, many people base their decisions on initial reactions or ""gut"" feelings. There are, however, powerful frameworks for making decisions more effectively based on computationally analyzing the choices available and their possible outcomes. In this course we give an introduction to some of these frameworks, including utility theory, decision analysis, and game theory. We also discuss why people sometimes make seemingly reasonable, yet irrational, decisions. We begin the class by presenting some of the basics of probability theory, which serves as the main mathematical foundation for the decision making frameworks we will subsequently present. Although we provide a mathematical/computational basis for the decision making frameworks we examine, we also seek to give intuitive (and sometimes counterintuitive) explanations for actual decision making behavior through in-class demonstrations. No prior experience with probability theory is needed (we'll cover what you need to know in class), but students should be comfortable with mathematical manipulation at the level of Math 20 or Math 41.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

CS 41: Hap.py Code: The Python Programming Language

The fundamentals and contemporary usage of the Python programming language. Primary focus on developing best practices in writing Python and exploring the extensible and unique parts of Python that make it such a powerful language. Topics include: data structures (e.g. lists and dictionaries) and characteristic pythonic conventions such as anonymous functions, iterables, and powerful built-ins (e.g. map, filter, zip). We will also cover object-oriented design, the standard library, and common third-party packages (e.g. requests, pillow). Time permitting, we will explore modern Python-based web frameworks and project distribution. Prerequisite: 106B/X or equivalent. Application required.
Terms: Spr | Units: 2 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

CS 42: Callback Me Maybe: Contemporary Javascript

Introduction to the JavaScript programming language with a focus on building contemporary applications. Course consists of in-class activities and programming assignments that challenge students to create functional web apps (e.g. Yelp, Piazza, Instagram). Topics include syntax/semantics, event-based programming, document object model (DOM), application programming interfaces (APIs), asynchronous JavaScript and XML (AJAX), jQuery, Node.js, and MongoDB. Prerequisite: CS 107.
Terms: Win | Units: 2 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

CS 44N: Computational Thinking and Systems in the Real-World

Computing in the real-world is too often viewed as working away concocting some computer incantations hidden inside some high technology company. However, computing and computer communication has infiltrated and in many cases revolutionized several ¿systems¿ in the real world, including financial systems, inventory management, advertising systems, supply chain management, transportation systems, defense systems and so on. Moreover, the discipline of thinking that has developed to build these systems, computational thinking, has powerful applicability to real-world problems and situations outside of computer programming. This course provides an introduction and exposure to some of these dramatic trends, opportunities and risks. Also included is an introduction to some basic ideas in ¿computational thinking¿. The course will include guest speakers. No programming competence is assumed but exposure to programming would be useful. Interest in the real world and interest is not being run-over by this trend is essential.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Cheriton, D. (PI)
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