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1 - 10 of 341 results for: CEE

CEE 1: Introduction to Environmental Systems Engineering

Field trips visiting environmental systems installations in Northern California, including coastal, freshwater, and urban infrastructure. Requirements: Several campus meetings, and field trips. Enrollment limited; priority given to undergraduates who have declared Environmental Systems Engineering major. Contact hildemann@stanford.edu to request enrollment/permission code.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

CEE 1A: Graphics Course

This course, intended for students taking a design studio, will focus on presentation theories, skills and design approaches. Through readings and exercises, and ultimately the student's own work, students will develop skill and complexity in their graphic and verbal presentations
Terms: Aut | Units: 2 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

CEE 10A: Introduction to Architecture

This class introduces students to the discipline of architecture and to the fundamental question: What is an architect and how is architecture distinct from other arts and sciences? To answer this question, the class will focus on concepts important to the practice of architecture including: project conception, drawing, modeling, materials, structure, form, and professionalism. These terms will be investigated through short talks, site visits, historical precedent, in-class exercises, panel discussions and two on-campus case studies. No prior knowledge of architecture is required.
Terms: Win | Units: 2 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

CEE 10B: Presentation Skills

TBD
Terms: not given this year | Units: 0 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

CEE 29N: Managing Natural Disaster Risk

Natural disasters arise from the interaction of natural processes, such as earthquakes or floods, with human development that suffers safety-related and economic losses. We cannot predict exactly when those disasters will occur, or prevent them entirely, but we have a number of engineering and policy options that can reduce the impacts of such events.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-AQR | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

CEE 31: Accessing Architecture Through Drawing

Preference to Architectural Design and CEE majors; others by consent of instructor. Drawing architecture to probe the intricacies and subtleties that characterize contemporary buildings. How to dissect buildings and appreciate the formal elements of a building, including scale, shape, proportion, colors and materials, and the problem solving reflected in the design. Students construct conventional architectural drawings, such as plans, elevations, and perspectives. Limited enrollment.
Terms: Aut, Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-CE | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Wood, E. (PI)

CEE 31Q: Accessing Architecture Through Drawing

Preference to sophomores. Drawing architecture provides a deeper understanding of the intricacies and subtleties that characterize contemporary buildings. How to dissect buildings and appreciate the formal elements of a building, including scale, shape, proportion, colors and materials, and the problem solving reflected in the design. Students construct conventional architectural drawings, such as plans, elevations, and perspectives. Limited enrollment.
Terms: Aut, Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-CE | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Barton, J. (PI)

CEE 32A: Psychology of Architecture

This course argues that architecture often neglects the interdisciplinary investigation of our internal psychological experience and the way it impacts our creation of space. How does our inner life influence external design? How are we impacted emotionally, physically, psychologically by the spaces we inhabit day to day? How might we intentionally imbue personal and public spaces with specific emotions? This seminar serves as a call to action for students interested in approaching architecture with a holistic understanding of the emotional impact of space. Sample topics addressed will include: conscious vs. unconscious design; the ego of architecture; psycho-spatial perspectives; ideas of home; integral/holistic architecture; phenomenology of inner and outer spaces; exploring archetypal architecture; and translating emotion through environment.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Larimer, A. (PI)

CEE 32B: Design Theory

This seminar focuses on the key themes, histories, and methods of architectural theory -- a form of architectural practice that establishes the aims and philosophies of architecture. Architectural theory is primarily written, but it also incorporates drawing, photography, film, and other media. nnOne of the distinctive features of modern and contemporary architecture is its pronounced use of theory to articulate its aims. One might argue that modern architecture is modern because of its incorporation of theory. This course focuses on those early-modern, modern, and late-modern writings that have been and remain entangled with contemporary architectural thought and design practice. nnRather than examine the development of modern architectural theory chronologically, it is explored architectural through thematic topics. These themes enable the student to understand how certain architectural theoretical concepts endure, are transformed, and can be furthered through his/her own explorations.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Beischer, T. (PI)

CEE 32D: Construction: The Writing of Architecture

This seminar focuses on the construction of architectural writing. The class will analyze this idea through four topics: formal analysis, manifesto, translation, and preservation. The seminar is divided into two-week modules with each of these four concepts functioning as organizing principles. nnThe first week of each module will involve familiarizing the seminar with both the terms and rhetorical tactics of the given theme by reading and analyzing specific texts and completing a short written analysis (1-2 pages). The second week will expand upon this foundation and involve further analysis in addition to each student writing a short paper (3-4 pages) drawing on the examples discussed and their own experiences in the discipline. The goal of the seminar is for each student to be able to analyze how an architectural writing is constructed and to develop his/her skills in the construction of his/her own writing.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
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