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1 - 10 of 170 results for: BIO

BIO 1: Human Evolution and Environment

Human genetic and cultural evolution and how people interact with their environments, from the ancestors of Australopithecus to current events. Issues include race, gender, and intelligence; pesticide and antibiotic resistance; abortion and contraception; ecosystem services; environmental economics and ethics; the evolution of religion; climate change; population growth and overconsumption; origins and spread of ideas and technologies; and the distribution of political and economic power.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

BIO 2N: Ecology and Evolution of Infectious Disease in a Changing World

This seminar will explore the ways in which anthropogenic change, climate change, habitat destruction, land use change, and species invasions effects the ecology and evolution of infectious diseases. Topics will include infectious diseases of humans, wildlife, livestock, and crops, effects of disease on threatened species, disease spillover, emerging diseases, and the role of disease in natural systems. Course will be taught through a combination of popular and scientific readings, discussion, and lecture. .
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Mordecai, E. (PI)

BIO 3: Frontiers in Marine Biology

An introduction to contemporary research in marine biology, including ecology, conservation biology, environmental toxicology, behavior, biomechanics, evolution, neurobiology, and molecular biology. Emphasis is on new discoveries and the technologies used to make them. Weekly lectures by faculty from the Hopkins Marine Station.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: Thompson, S. (PI)

BIO 3N: Views of a Changing Sea: Literature & Science

The state of a changing world ocean, particularly in the eastern Pacific, will be examined through historical and contemporary fiction, non-fiction and scientific publications. Issues will include harvest and mariculture fisheries, land-sea interactions and oceanic climate change in both surface and deep waters.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Gilly, W. (PI)

BIO 4N: Peopleomics: The science and ethics of personalized genomic medicine

Exploration of the new field of personalized genomic medicine. Personalized medicine is based on the idea that each person's unique genome sequence can be used to predict risk of acquiring specific diseases, and to make more informed medical choices. The science behind these approaches; where they are heading in the future; and the ethical implications such technology presents. Lectures augmented with hands-on experience in exploring and analyzing a real person's genome.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

BIO 7N: Introduction to Conservation Photography

Introduction to the field of conservation photography and the strategic use of visual communication in addressing issues concerning the environment and conservation. Students will be introduced to basic digital photography, digital image processing, and the theory and application of photographic techniques. Case studies of conservation issues will be examined through photographs and multimedia platforms including images, video, and audio. Lectures, tutorials, demonstrations, and optional field trips will culminate in the production of individual and group projects.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

BIO 7S: Introduction to Biology

Introduction to several major fields of biology, including biochemistry, cell biology, genetics, evolution, and biodiversity. Introduces the general approaches used by scientists to study life and explores recent advances in each area during weekly discussion section. Not intended for biology majors, but provides the foundation for higher-level biology courses. Prerequisite: high school biology.
Terms: Sum | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

BIO 7SL: Introduction to Biology Lab

Optional laboratory to be taken with BIO7S. Introduction to basic biological laboratory techniques, including microscopy, identification of biomolecules, assaying enzyme activity, genetic manipulation of microorganisms, assaying the effects of gene mutation on protein function, and using PCR to genotype organisms.
Terms: Sum | Units: 2 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

BIO 9S: Introduction to Biological Research Methods

Theory and practice of experimental biology. Introduction to how to plan an experiment, conduct, and analyze data. Introduction to scientific writing and reading scientific journal articles. Prerequisite: high school biology.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

BIO 10AX: Conservation Photography

Account of the genre of conservation photography and strategic use of visual communication in the environmental arena. Introduction to use of digital SLR cameras and digital image processing. Case studies of conservation issues accompanied by multimedia platforms including images, video, and audio. Theory and application of photographic techniques. Lectures, tutorials, demonstrations, and field trips. Individual and group projects.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 2 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
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