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1 - 10 of 88 results for: ARCHLGY

ARCHLGY 1: Introduction to Prehistoric Archeology (ANTHRO 3)

Aims, methods, and data in the study of human society's development from early hunters through late prehistoric civilizations. Archaeological sites and remains characteristic of the stages of cultural development for selected geographic areas, emphasizing methods of data collection and analysis appropriate to each.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-A-II, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ARCHLGY 10: The Archaeology of Home (ANTHRO 10A)

Homes evoke powerful emotions about place and also highlight the dynamic and complex nature of people, their relationships, and the broader society they live in. Focus on the ways that material traces from the past shed light on the diversity of domestic life, which includes household organization, economic strategies, diet and status, rituals, and identity. Archaeological case studies to see how archaeologists identify reoccurring patterns in material culture found in homes or domestic dwellings to reconstruct household patterns and social relations.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ARCHLGY 12: Peopling of the Globe: Changing Patterns of Land Use and Consumption Over the Last 50,000 Years

Fossil, genetic and archaeological evidence suggest that modern humans began to disperse out of Africa about 50,000 years ago. Subsequently, humans have colonized every major landmass on earth. This class introduces students to the data and issues regarding human dispersal, migration and colonization of continents and islands around the world. We explore problems related to the timing and cause of colonizing events, and investigate questions about changing patterns of land use, demography and consumption. Students are introduced to critical relationships between prehistoric population changes and our contemporary environmental crisis.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ARCHLGY 13: Islamic Routes: Archaeology and Heritage of Muslim Societies (ANTHRO 13A, HISTORY 7E, HISTORY 107E)

How has archaeology changed our knowledge of the spread of Islam and past Muslim societies? How does archaeology shape heritage debates, conflicts and ideas about Islam today? Topics include the city and urban change, secular and religious life, gender, economy, and globalization. These topics are explored using archaeological and critical heritage approaches. Focus is on examples drawn from Syria-Palestine, Egypt, Iraq, Arabian Peninsula, India, and Africa. Sources include archaeological data and material culture, historical texts in translation, and photography.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ARCHLGY 16: Native Americans in the 21st Century: Encounters, Identity, and Sovereignty in Contemporary America (ANTHRO 16, ANTHRO 116C, NATIVEAM 16)

What does it mean to be a Native American in the 21st century? Beyond traditional portrayals of military conquests, cultural collapse, and assimilation, the relationships between Native Americans and American society. Focus is on three themes leading to in-class moot court trials: colonial encounters and colonizing discourses; frontiers and boundaries; and sovereignty of self and nation. Topics include gender in native communities, American Indian law, readings by native authors, and Indians in film and popular culture.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-AmerCul, WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Wilcox, M. (PI)

ARCHLGY 21Q: Eight Great Archaeological Sites in Europe (CLASSICS 21Q)

(Formerly CLASSART 21Q.) Preference to sophomores. Focus is on excavation, features and finds, arguments over interpretation, and the place of each site in understanding the archaeological history of Europe. Goal is to introduce the latest archaeological and anthropological thought, and raise key questions about ancient society. The archaeological perspective foregrounds interdisciplinary study: geophysics articulated with art history, source criticism with analytic modeling, statistics interpretation. A web site with resources about each site, including plans, photographs, video, and publications, is the basis for exploring.
Terms: Aut, Spr | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II, Writing 2 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Shanks, M. (PI)

ARCHLGY 34: Animals and Us (ANTHRO 34)

The human-animal relationship is dynamic, all encompassing and durable. Without exception, all socio-cultural groups have evidenced complex interactions with the animals around them, both domesticated and wild. However, the individual circumstances of these interactions are hugely complicated, and involve much more than direct human-animal contact, going far beyond this to incorporate social, ecological and spiritual contexts.n This course delves into this complexity, covering the gamut of social roles played by animals, as well as the methods and approaches to studying these, both traditional and scientific. While the notion of `animals as social actors¿ is well acknowledged, their use as proxies for human autecology (the relationship between a species and its environment) is also increasingly recognized as a viable mechanism for understanding our cultural and economic past. It will piece together the breadth of human-animal relationships using a wide geographic range of case studies.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ARCHLGY 42: Pompeii

(Formerly CLASSART 42 and CLASSGEN 60.) The Roman town of Pompeii, buried by the eruption of Mt. Vesuvius in 79 C.E., provides information about the art and archaeology of ancient social life, urban technology and production, and ancient spatial patterns and experience. Its fame illustrates modern relationships to the ancient past, from Pompeii's importance on the Grand Tour, to plaster casts of vaporized bodies, to debates about reconstruction, preservation, and archaeological methods.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ARCHLGY 51: Introduction to Greek Archaeology (CLASSICS 51)

An introduction to the archaeology of ancient Greece, from the first city states through the cultural achievements of classical Athens to the conquest by Rome.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Shanks, M. (PI)

ARCHLGY 64: Cultural Heritage and Human Rights (ARCHLGY 164)

This interdisciplinary research workshop will critically engage the issue of the growing currency of human rights discourse within cultural heritage. Epistemological and practical areas of tension between rights discourse and cultural discourse will be surveyed within the context of current global challenges facing heritage practice, conservation and archaeology. Topics will include the inequities of cultural recognition between North-South globalizations, questions of cultural property and rights, the role of tourism, and the impact of environmental conservation discourse on cultural rights.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 1 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
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