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11 - 20 of 20 results for: DLCL

DLCL 222: Philosophy and Literature

The Focal Group in Philosophy and Literature brings together scholars and students from eight departments to investigate questions in aesthetics and literary theory, philosophically-inflected literary texts, and the form of philosophical writings. Fields of interest include both continental and analytic philosophy, as well as cognitive science, political philosophy, rational choice theory, and related fields. Prerequisite for undergraduates: undergraduate students wishing to take DLCL 222 must previously have taken the philosophy and literature gateway course PHIL 81 ( CLASSICS 42, COMPLIT 181, ENGLISH 81, FRENCH 181, GERMAN 181, ITALIAN 181, SLAVIC 181) or a class taught by one of the instructors of DLCL 222.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Credit/No Credit

DLCL 223: Renaissances

The Renaissances Group brings together faculty members and students from over a dozen departments at Stanford to consider the present and future of early modern literary studies (a period spanning the fourteenth through the seventeenth centuries). Taking seriously the plural form of the group's name, we seek to explore the early modern period from a wide range of disciplinary, cultural, linguistic, and geographical perspectives.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Greene, R. (PI)

DLCL 224: Workshop in Poetics

The Workshop in Poetics is concerned with the theoretical and practical dimensions of the reading and criticism of poetry. During the eleven years of its existence, the Workshop has become a central venue at Stanford enabling participants to share their individual projects in a general conversation outside of disciplinary and national confinements. The two dimensions that the workshop sees as urgent are: poetics in its specificity as an arena for theory and interpretive practice, and historical poetics as a particular set of challenges for the reader and scholar.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Greene, R. (PI)

DLCL 227: Persian, Arabic, Turkish, and Hebrew Languages, Literatures, and Cultures

PATH+ is a DLCL focal group that provides a space for conversations about Persian, Arabic, Turkish, and Hebrew languages, literatures, and cultures in the DLCL. To earn the unit, undergraduate and graduate students should attend the workshops held by the focal group and contribute one substantive response during the year. This can come in the form of an individual discussion with one of the two lead faculty, 1,500 words of contribution to the focal group's online platforms, or a presentation to the group itself.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Key, A. (PI)

DLCL 228: Literature and Technology: An Introduction to Digital Humanities (COMPLIT 228D, COMPLIT 338D)

What do computers have to do with the study of literature? Can programming help us learn more about texts? Students in this course will explore these and similar questions through project-based learning. By developing their own digital research project, either in collaboration or solo, students will gain an understanding of the methods and challenges of the field known as "digital humanities". Students will also read and discuss scholarship about the use of computers for the study of literature using Lacuna, an online reading and annotation environment developed at Stanford. Class time will be divided between theory and practice: we will discuss readings that contextualize and question the tools and methods commonly used, then we will use those tools and methods in project work.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1-5 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

DLCL 229: The Contemporary

The Contemporary is a focal group dedicated to the study of recent innovative works in literature and the arts as they touch on social, political, and philosophical concerns of our era. Building on and expanding the theoretical framework offered by thinkers as Hannah Arendt, Paul Rabinow, or Giorgio Agamben, we seek to trace the capacity of the artistic imagination to broaden the vocabulary with which we address contemporary challenges to freedom and to meaningful action. To earn the unit, undergraduate and graduate students should attend the workshops held by the focal group and contribute one substantive response during the year. This can come in the form of an individual discussion with one of the two lead faculty, 1,500 words of contribution to the focal group's online platforms, or a presentation to the group itself. May be repeat for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Eshel, A. (PI)

DLCL 259C: Ecological Humanities (ANTHRO 159C, ANTHRO 259C, REES 259C)

What sort of topics, research questions, approaches, theories and concepts lead to an integration of various kinds of knowledges? Ecological Humanities provides a conceptual platform for a merger of humanities and social sciences with earth and life sciences, soil science and forensic sciences. The course will discuss such selected topics as the Anthropocene, geologic/mineral and exhumed subjects/personae, bio- and geosocial collectives, symbiotic life-forms, non-human agencies, and forensic landscapes as examples of this merger.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Domanska, E. (PI)

DLCL 301: The Learning and Teaching of Second Languages

This course approaches the teaching of second languages from a learning perspective. In other words, it eschews the traditional focus on ¿teaching methods¿ and emphasizes instructional decision-making within the context of learners¿ intellectual and linguistic development. The course is designed to prepare language instructors to teach languages at the beginning and intermediate levels in a variety of university settings to an array of populations.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

DLCL 311: Professional Workshop

Meets regularly throughout the year to discuss issues in the professional study of literature. Topics include the academic job market and the challenges of research and teaching at different types of institutions. Supervised by the graduate affairs committee of the DLCL. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Win, Spr | Units: 1-2 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: Galvez, M. (PI)

DLCL 354A: DLCL Film Series: Rebel With a Cause (DLCL 152A)

This quarter's film series will examine the representation of resistance, rebellion, and revolt in international cinema. Starting with Michael Almereyda's biographical drama Experimenter (2015), we will examine Stanley Milgram's studies on complicity, conformity, and resistance in his famous experiments on following instructions to inflict pain. From there we will move to canonical cinematic representations of acts of resistance like Florian Henckel von Donnersmarck's The Lives of Others (2006), Jean-Pierre Melville's Army of Shadows (1969), and Sergei Eisenstein's Battleship Potemkin (1925) to discuss why these films have been canonized as some of the most suspenseful and powerful films of all time. Viewing Marcel Carné's Children of Paradise (1945), filmed during the Nazi Occupation of France, and Victor Erice's The Spirit of the Beehive (1973), filmed during the Franco regime in Spain, will allow us to discuss the ways that cinema itself is used as a tool of resistance. And discussi more »
This quarter's film series will examine the representation of resistance, rebellion, and revolt in international cinema. Starting with Michael Almereyda's biographical drama Experimenter (2015), we will examine Stanley Milgram's studies on complicity, conformity, and resistance in his famous experiments on following instructions to inflict pain. From there we will move to canonical cinematic representations of acts of resistance like Florian Henckel von Donnersmarck's The Lives of Others (2006), Jean-Pierre Melville's Army of Shadows (1969), and Sergei Eisenstein's Battleship Potemkin (1925) to discuss why these films have been canonized as some of the most suspenseful and powerful films of all time. Viewing Marcel Carné's Children of Paradise (1945), filmed during the Nazi Occupation of France, and Victor Erice's The Spirit of the Beehive (1973), filmed during the Franco regime in Spain, will allow us to discuss the ways that cinema itself is used as a tool of resistance. And discussing Walter Salles' Motorcycle Diaries (2004), Francisco Vargas' The Violin (2005), and Quentin Tarantino's Inglourious Basterds (2009) will allow us to explore the ways that resistance in diverse forms from unexpected actors can lead to movements that may or may not change the world. Discussion will focus on analyzing the structures, actors, and acts of resistance, rebellion, and revolt in international film. In particular we will look at who resists and why; how a rebel's identity and social position affects his or her political engagement; and how different forms of resistance can create movements that evolve from grassroots, across governments, and around the globe. In our study of representations of resistance across different schools and cultures of cinema, film technologies, and cinematic history, we will also address the ways that film creates suspense and intrigue, represents cause and effect, and prompts questions of ethics. Screening Schedule: April 4 Experimenter (2015) Michael Almereyda , April 11 Army of Shadows (1969) Jean-Pierre Melville, April 18 Children of Paradise (1946) Marcel Carné , April 25 Battleship Potemkin (1925) Sergei Eisenstein, May 2 The Lives of Others (2006) Florian Henckel von Donnersmarck, May 9 Motorcycle Diaries (2004) Walter Salles, May 16 The Violin (2005) Francisco Vargas, May 23 The Battle of Algiers (1966) Gillo Pontecorvo, June 6 The Spirit of the Beehive (1973) Victor Erice , and June 13 Inglourious Basterds (2009) Quentin Tarantino.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Credit/No Credit
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