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11 - 20 of 20 results for: DLCL

DLCL 222: Philosophy and Literature

The Focal Group in Philosophy and Literature brings together scholars and students from eight departments to investigate questions in aesthetics and literary theory, philosophically-inflected literary texts, and the form of philosophical writings. Fields of interest include both continental and analytic philosophy, as well as cognitive science, political philosophy, rational choice theory, and related fields. Prerequisite for undergraduates: undergraduate students wishing to take DLCL 222 must previously have taken the philosophy and literature gateway course PHIL 81 ( CLASSICS 42, COMPLIT 181, ENGLISH 81, FRENCH 181, GERMAN 181, ITALIAN 181, SLAVIC 181) or a class taught by one of the instructors of DLCL 222.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Credit/No Credit

DLCL 223: Renaissances

The Renaissances Group brings together faculty members and students from over a dozen departments at Stanford to consider the present and future of early modern literary studies (a period spanning the fourteenth through the seventeenth centuries). Taking seriously the plural form of the group's name, we seek to explore the early modern period from a wide range of disciplinary, cultural, linguistic, and geographical perspectives.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Greene, R. (PI)

DLCL 224: Workshop in Poetics

The Workshop in Poetics is concerned with the theoretical and practical dimensions of the reading and criticism of poetry. During the eleven years of its existence, the Workshop has become a central venue at Stanford enabling participants to share their individual projects in a general conversation outside of disciplinary and national confinements. The two dimensions that the workshop sees as urgent are: poetics in its specificity as an arena for theory and interpretive practice, and historical poetics as a particular set of challenges for the reader and scholar.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Greene, R. (PI)

DLCL 227: Persian, Arabic, Turkish, and Hebrew Languages, Literatures, and Cultures

PATH+ is a DLCL focal group that provides a space for conversations about Persian, Arabic, Turkish, and Hebrew languages, literatures, and cultures in the DLCL. To earn the unit, undergraduate and graduate students should attend the workshops held by the focal group and contribute one substantive response during the year. This can come in the form of an individual discussion with one of the two lead faculty, 1,500 words of contribution to the focal group's online platforms, or a presentation to the group itself.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

DLCL 228: Literature and Technology: An Introduction to Digital Humanities (COMPLIT 228D, COMPLIT 338D)

What do computers have to do with the study of literature? Can programming help us learn more about texts? Students in this course will explore these and similar questions through project-based learning. By developing their own digital research project¿either in collaboration or solo¿students will gain an understanding of the methods and challenges of the field known as ¿digital humanities.¿ Students will also read and discuss scholarship about the use of computers for the study of literature using Lacuna, an online reading and annotation environment developed at Stanford. Class time will be divided between theory and practice: we will discuss readings that contextualize and question the tools and methods commonly used, then we will use those tools and methods in project work.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1-3 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: Widner, M. (PI)

DLCL 229: The Contemporary

The Contemporary is a focal group dedicated to the study of recent innovative works in literature and the arts as they touch on social, political, and philosophical concerns of our era. Building on and expanding the theoretical framework offered by thinkers as Hannah Arendt, Paul Rabinow, or Giorgio Agamben, we seek to trace the capacity of the artistic imagination to broaden the vocabulary with which we address contemporary challenges to freedom and to meaningful action. To earn the unit, undergraduate and graduate students should attend the workshops held by the focal group and contribute one substantive response during the year. This can come in the form of an individual discussion with one of the two lead faculty, 1,500 words of contribution to the focal group's online platforms, or a presentation to the group itself. May be repeat for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Eshel, A. (PI)

DLCL 301: The Learning and Teaching of Second Languages

This course approaches the teaching of second languages from a learning perspective. In other words, it eschews the traditional focus on ¿teaching methods¿ and emphasizes instructional decision-making within the context of learners¿ intellectual and linguistic development. The course is designed to prepare language instructors to teach languages at the beginning and intermediate levels in a variety of university settings to an array of populations.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

DLCL 311: Professional Workshop

Meets regularly throughout the year to discuss issues in the professional study of literature. Topics include the academic job market and the challenges of research and teaching at different types of institutions. Supervised by the graduate affairs committee of the DLCL. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Win, Spr | Units: 1-2 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: Galvez, M. (PI)

DLCL 333: Philosophy, Literature, and the Arts Core Seminar (ENGLISH 333, PHIL 333)

This course serves as the Core Seminar for the PhD Minor in Philosophy, Literature, and the Arts. It introduces students to a wide range of topics at the intersection of philosophy with literary and arts criticism. In this year's installment of the seminar, we will focus on issues about the nature of fiction, about the experience of appreciation and what it does for us, about the ethical consequences of imaginative fictions, and about different conceptions of the importance of the arts in life more broadly. The seminar is intended for graduate students. It is suitable for theoretically ambitious students of literature and the arts, philosophers with interests in value theory, aesthetics, and topics in language and mind, and other students with strong interest in the psychological importance of engagement with the arts. May be repeat for credit
Terms: Win | Units: 2-4 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

DLCL 354A: DLCL Film Series: Queer Cinema (DLCL 152A)

This quarter's film series will showcase ten of the most remarkable films and filmmakers in the long and under-represented history of queer cinema. Starting with Ang Lee's groundbreaking Brokeback Mountain (2005), we will discuss the issues of queer space, surveillance, and gender performance. Moving from cowboys to schoolgirls and streetgirls to further examine our assumptions about performance, sexuality, and space, we will discuss Leontine Sagan's classic Girls in Uniform (1931) and Sean Baker's recent smash hit Tangerine (2015). Turning towards the historical representation of queer communities we will watch Jennie Livingston's documentary Paris is Burning (1990) and Luchino Visconti's The Damned (1969) to examine the ways that homosexuality has been positively and negatively represented as subversive and decadent. For a lighter note, we will watch Jaco van Dormael's thought-provoking The Brand New Testament (2015), which imagines a complete resetting of social norms, and Céline Sc more »
This quarter's film series will showcase ten of the most remarkable films and filmmakers in the long and under-represented history of queer cinema. Starting with Ang Lee's groundbreaking Brokeback Mountain (2005), we will discuss the issues of queer space, surveillance, and gender performance. Moving from cowboys to schoolgirls and streetgirls to further examine our assumptions about performance, sexuality, and space, we will discuss Leontine Sagan's classic Girls in Uniform (1931) and Sean Baker's recent smash hit Tangerine (2015). Turning towards the historical representation of queer communities we will watch Jennie Livingston's documentary Paris is Burning (1990) and Luchino Visconti's The Damned (1969) to examine the ways that homosexuality has been positively and negatively represented as subversive and decadent. For a lighter note, we will watch Jaco van Dormael's thought-provoking The Brand New Testament (2015), which imagines a complete resetting of social norms, and Céline Sciamma's Tomboy (2011), both of which examine the sometimes comical oftentimes challenging experiences of queer youth. To examine how queer relationships break down national, linguistic, and cultural boundaries we will watch Wong Kar-Wai's Happy Together (1997) and Pedro Almodóvar's All About My Mother (1999). Finally, to conclude our series, we will screen Barry Jenkins' recent award-winning film Moonlight (2016).nnDiscussion will focus on analyzing the relationships between gender and sexuality, love and friendship, body and performance and discussing issues of sexuality, race, and class as well as the different ways that film has represented homosexuality and transsexuality across cultures, schools of cinema, film technologies, and history.nnAll screenings are free and open to the public and audience members are encouraged to participate in the discussions following the films. Please note that grades for this course are entirely dependent on attendance of at least seven screenings. Missed screenings can be made-up by writing a short paper on the film, pre-arranged with the instructor. Please be aware that some films may include graphic or disturbing content: viewers are therefore advised to familiarize themselves with the films' content before viewing. May be repeated for credit. nnScreening schedule:nJan 10 Brokeback Mountain (2005) Ang LeenJan 17 Girls In Uniform (1931) Leontine SagannJan 24 Tangerine (2015) Sean Baker nJan 31 Paris Is Burning (1990) Jennie Livingston nFeb 7 The Damned (1969) Luchino Visconti nFeb 14 The Brand New Testament (2015) Jaco Van Dormael nFeb 21 Tomboy (2011) Céline Sciamma nFeb 28 Happy Together (1997) Wong Kar-Wai nMar 7 All About My Mother (1999) Pedro Almodóvar nMar 14 Moonlight (2016) Barry Jenkins
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Credit/No Credit
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