2013-2014 2014-2015 2015-2016 2016-2017 2017-2018
Browse
by subject...
    Schedule
view...
 

1 - 10 of 26 results for: URBANST ; Currently searching winter courses. You can expand your search to include all quarters

URBANST 68S: New Orleans: An American City? (AFRICAAM 68S, AMSTUD 68S, HISTORY 68S)

Some scholars argue that New Orleans is not quite an American city, but is instead a cultural hybrid of Europe, Africa, and the Caribbean. This course will investigate that claim by studying New Orleans from its colonial period to the present. Topics include colonial empires, the role of New Orleans as the largest slave market in North America, the Great Mississippi Flood of 1927, Civil Rights, Carnival, tourism, religion, and state and federal responses to Hurricane Katrina, among others.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Modica, J. (PI)

URBANST 100A: Capital or Community: Housing Inequality in the Bay Area

How has housing policy played a role in the marginalization of various groups in the United States? Are there concrete ways of addressing the current housing crisis in the Bay Area? How are individuals such as Stanford students affected by housing, and how do they impact it? This one unit course aims to explore ideas about housing inequality as they intersect with marginalized groups in the Bay Area, including immigrants and people of color. We will begin the class by looking at the history of urban planning and housing policy in various cities to look at how housing issues have played a role in the nature of marginalized groups, and how that affects these groups to this day. We¿ll explore major cities such as New York and Chicago before examining the history of San Francisco. We¿ll later focus on current housing inequality issues in the Bay Area and a look at what community organizations have done to address these issues. By the end of this course, students will have an understanding more »
How has housing policy played a role in the marginalization of various groups in the United States? Are there concrete ways of addressing the current housing crisis in the Bay Area? How are individuals such as Stanford students affected by housing, and how do they impact it? This one unit course aims to explore ideas about housing inequality as they intersect with marginalized groups in the Bay Area, including immigrants and people of color. We will begin the class by looking at the history of urban planning and housing policy in various cities to look at how housing issues have played a role in the nature of marginalized groups, and how that affects these groups to this day. We¿ll explore major cities such as New York and Chicago before examining the history of San Francisco. We¿ll later focus on current housing inequality issues in the Bay Area and a look at what community organizations have done to address these issues. By the end of this course, students will have an understanding of the intersections that come with housing rights issues, especially as it relates to the Bay Area. The course is open to all students from all backgrounds and interests. Students do not need to have any kind of particular disciplinary training or specific knowledge about housing or the social landscape of different marginalized groups in order to partake in the class and the trip.
Terms: Win | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: Kahan, M. (PI)

URBANST 108B: Gender in the Arab and Middle Eastern City (ANTHRO 108B, FEMGEN 108B)

What are the components of gendered experience in the city, and how are these shaped by history and culture? How do meanings attributed to Islam and the Middle East obscure the specificity of women¿s and men¿s lives in Muslim-majority cities? This course explores gender norms and gendered experience in the major cities of Arab-majority countries, Iran and Turkey. Assigned historical and sociological readings contextualize feminism in these countries. Established and recent anthropological publications address modernity, mobility, reproduction, consumption, and social movements within urban contexts. Students will engage with some of the key figures shaping debates about gender, class, and Islam in countries of the region typically referenced as North Africa and the Middle East (MENA). They will also evaluate regional media addressing concerns about gender in light of the historical content of the course and related political concepts.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Said, K. (PI)

URBANST 110: Introduction to Urban Studies

Designed for freshmen and sophomores. Introduction to the study of cities and urban civilization focusing on the utopias that have been produced over time to guide and inspire city-dwellers to improve and perfect their urban environments. History of urbanization and the urban planning theories inspired by Ebenezer Howard, Le Corbusier, Frank Lloyd Wright, the New Urbanists and Smart Growth advocates that address current issues such as urban community dynamics, suburbanization, sustainability, and globalization. Public policy approaches designed to address these issues and utopian visions of what cities could be, or should be, in the future. Topic of the final paper chosen by the student, with consent of instructor, and may be a historical research paper, a policy-advocacy paper, or a proposal for an urban utopia that addresses the challenges and possibilities of urban life today.
Terms: Win, Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-AmerCul, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

URBANST 112: The Urban Underclass (CSRE 149A, SOC 149, SOC 249)

(Graduate students register for 249.) Recent research and theory on the urban underclass, including evidence on the concentration of African Americans in urban ghettos, and the debate surrounding the causes of poverty in urban settings. Ethnic/racial conflict, residential segregation, and changes in the family structure of the urban poor.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-AmerCul, WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

URBANST 113: Introduction to Urban Design: Contemporary Urban Design in Theory and Practice

Comparative studies in neighborhood conservation, inner city regeneration, and growth policies for metropolitan regions. Lect-disc and research focusing on case studies from North America and abroad, team urban design projects. Two Saturday class workshops in San Francisco: 2nd and 4th Saturdays of the quarter. Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DBSocSci | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-CE, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Glanz, D. (PI)

URBANST 123: Approaching Research and the Community (CSRE 146A)

Comparative perspective on research with communities and basic overview of research methodologies, with an emphasis on the principles and practices of doing community-based research as a collaborative enterprise between academic researchers and community members. How academic scholarship can be made useful to communities. How service experiences and interests can be used to develop research questions in collaboration with communities and serve as a starting point for developing senior theses or other independent research projects. Through the coursework, students are encouraged to develop a draft proposal for an actual community-based research project. The course is highly recommended for students planning to apply for community-based summer research fellowships through the Haas Center for Public Service (Community-based Research Fellowship Program) or CRSE (Community Research Summer Internship). Students who complete the course will be given priority for these fellowships. This course must be taken for a minimum of 3 units and a letter grade to be eligible for Ways credit
Terms: Win | Units: 2-3 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Hurd, C. (PI)

URBANST 124: Spatial Approaches to Social Science (ANTHRO 130D, ANTHRO 230D, POLISCI 241S)

This multidisciplinary course combines different approaches to how GIS and spatial tools can be applied in social science research. We take a collaborative, project oriented approach to bring together technical expertise and substantive applications from several social science disciplines. The course aims to integrate tools, methods, and current debates in social science research and will enable students to engage in critical spatial research and a multidisciplinary dialogue around geographic space.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-AQR, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

URBANST 125: Shades of Green: Redesigning and Rethinking the Environmental Justice Movements (CSRE 125E, EARTHSYS 125, EARTHSYS 225)

Historically, discussions of race, ethnicity, culture, and equity in the environment have been relegated to the environmental justice movement, which often focuses on urban environmental degradation and remains separated from other environmental movements. This course will seek to break out of this limiting discussion. We will explore access to outdoor spaces, definitions of wilderness, who is and isn't included in environmental organizations, gender and the outdoors, how colonialism has influenced ways of knowing, and the future of climate change. The course will also have a design thinking community partnership project. Students will work with partner organizations to problem-solve around issues of access and diversity. We value a diversity of experiences and epistemological beliefs, and therefore undergraduates and graduate students from all disciplines are welcome.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

URBANST 126: Spirituality and Nonviolent Urban and Social Transformation (CSRE 162A, RELIGST 162X)

A life of engagement in social transformation is often built on a foundation of spiritual and religious commitments. Case studies of nonviolent social change agents including Rosa Parks in the civil rights movement, César Chávez in the labor movement, and WIlliam Sloane Coffin in the peace movement; the religious and spiritual underpinnings of their commitments. Theory and principles of nonviolence. Films and readings. Service learning component includes placements in organizations engaged in social transformation. Service Learning Course (certified by Haas Center).
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Filter Results:
term offered
updating results...
number of units
updating results...
time offered
updating results...
days
updating results...
UG Requirements (GERs)
updating results...
component
updating results...
career
updating results...
© Stanford University | Terms of Use | Copyright Complaints